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UNIVERSITY SECRETARIAT
• Board of Governors
• Senate
Gilmour Hall, Room 210
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4L8
Phone: 905.525.9140, Ext. 24337
Fax:
905.526.9884
E-mail: [email protected]
http://www.mcmaster.ca/univsec
February 17, 2015
TO:
Members of Undergraduate Council
FROM:
Tamara Bates
Assistant University Secretary
RE:
Notice of Meeting
The next meeting of Undergraduate Council will be held on Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at
2:30 p.m., in the Council Room, Gilmour Hall (GH 111). The items of business to be
discussed are outlined on the agenda provided with this meeting notice.
Should you be unable to attend the meeting, please notify the University Secretariat at extension
24337 or e-mail [email protected]
McMaster University
UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL
Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 2:30 p.m.
in the Council Room (GH 111)
AGENDA
I
MINUTES of the meeting of January 27, 2015 (attached – for approval)
II
BUSINESS ARISING
III
CHAIR’S REMARKS
IV
POLICY ON ACADEMIC ACCOMMODATION FOR RELIGIOUS, INDIGENOUS, AND
SPIRITUAL OBSERVANCES (attached – for approval)
V
McMASTER STUDENT ABSENCE FORM (attached – for approval)
VI
REPORT FROM CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS COMMITTEE – ESTABLISHMENT
OF A JOINT UNDERGRADUATE-GRADUATE CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS
COMMITTEE (attached – for approval in principle)
VII
REPORT OF THE UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL AWARDS COMMITTEE (attached –
for approval/information)
For Approval
i.
Terms of Awards
ii.
Changes to Terms of Awards
iii.
Changes to Terms of Community Contribution Awards
iv.
New Bursaries
v.
Changes to Terms of Bursaries
For Information
vi.
Award Name Changes
vii.
Award Value Changes
viii. Award Recipients by Faculty
ix.
Allocations of the H.L. Hooker and University Senate Scholarships
x.
Awards Not Allocated
xi.
2013-2014 Exchange Scholarships
xii.
2014 Summer Travel Scholarships
VIII
FACULTY OF SCIENCE –CURRICULUM REVISIONS (attached – for approval)
IX
CYCLICAL PROGRAM REVIEWS – (attached - for review/comment)
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
vii.
viii.
ix.
X
English and Cultural Studies
Arts & Science
Bachelor of Technology – Four‐Year Degree Programs
Bachelor of Technology – Degree Completion Programs
Classics
Health, Aging, & Society
Nursing
School of Geography and Earth Sciences
Social Work
OTHER BUSINESS
Agenda Item I
McMaster University
UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL
Tuesday, January 27, 2015 at 2:30 p.m.
Council Room (Room 111), Gilmour Hall
PRESENT:
Dr. E. Mohammad, (Chair), Ms P. Bernard, Dr. L. Campbell, Dr. R. Chen,
Dr. K. Coley, Mr. J. Klugsberg, Mr. P. DeMaio, Dr. M. Farquharson,
Dr. R. Frager, Ms K. Gonsalves, Dr. P. Harrison, Ms V. Lewis, Dr. A. Moro,
Dr. A. Neville, Ms M. Pool, Dr. S. Sarkar, Dr. S. Westerholm, Dr. J. Wilson,
Ms T. Bates (Assistant University Secretary)
BY INVITATION: Dr. C. Sinding
REGRETS:
I
Mr. A. Chan, Dr. S. Searls Giroux, Mr. A.Sciascetti
MINUTES
On a motion duly moved and seconded, the minutes of the meeting held on December 9,
2014 were approved.
II
BUSINESS ARISING
Council was reminded that at the last meeting, the Arts & Science Program had proposed
a number of program closures, including the Combined Bachelor of Arts & Science and
Social Work program. However, the proposed closure was predicated on the planned closure
of the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Work program (B.A./B.S.W.), which is planned
to be replaced with a new Honours Bachelor of Social Work program. It was decided,
therefore, that the Combined Bachelor of Arts & Science and Social Work program will
not be closed at this time, but will be reviewed as the plans to close and wind down the
B.A./B.S.W. program are made known. As a result, the closure of the Combined Bachelor
of Arts & Science and Social Work program was withdrawn from the Undergraduate Council
report to the University Planning Committee.
Ms Pool reminded Council that the recommendation to establish a Fall Recess proposal
included a reduction of the length of examinations from 2 to 3 hours to 2 to 2.5 hours.
Currently the General Academic Regulations outlined in the Undergraduate Calendar indicate
that for the December examination period, students with two consecutive examinations
scheduled on the same day, if the first examination is three hours long, may make an
application for special arrangement to the Scheduling and Examinations Office within the
Office of the Registrar. Although Council agreed to maintain the spirit of this regulation at
an earlier meeting, Ms Pool clarified that the purpose of this regulation was to help students
who would be required to go from one examination directly into another one. The reduction
of the length of examinations makes this provision no longer necessary, and so it will be
removed from the regulations.
Agenda Item I
2
III
CHAIR’S REMARKS
The Chair had no comments or updates.
IV
REPORT OF THE UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL CURRICULUM AND
ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE (Appendix A)
i.
Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine – Academic Regulations
Undergraduate Council reviewed the report from the Curriculum and Admissions
Committee. Several minor revisions to the Academic Regulations for the Michael
G. DeGroote School of Medicine are proposed, the most significant of which are to
the Academic Eligibility Requirements resulting to scoring methods on the Medical
College Admissions Test (MCAT).
It was duly moved and seconded,
that Undergraduate Council approve the minor revisions to Academic
Regulations for the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine, as recommended
by the Faculty of Health Sciences, for inclusion in the 2015-2016 Undergraduate
Calendar, as outlined in Appendix A.
The motion was carried.
ii.
Faculty of Social Sciences – Academic Regulations
Minor changes to program requirements include an increase to the minimum number
of units of Social Sciences courses required for Level I of the Bachelor of Arts in
Social Sciences program and some minor revisions to the procedures for application
to Level II programs as a result of the implementation of Mosaic.
It was duly moved and seconded,
that Undergraduate Council approve the minor revisions to Academic
Regulations, as recommended by the Faculty of Social Sciences, for inclusion
in the 2015-2016 Undergraduate Calendar, as outlined in Appendix A.
The motion was carried.
iii.
Faculty of Engineering – Three New Courses
Three new courses are being introduced for the Software Engineering program.
It was duly moved and seconded,
that Undergraduate Council approve three new courses, SFWR ENG 3FP3 –
Functional Programming, SFWR ENG 3TC3 – Theory of Computation, and
SFWR ENG 4AD3 – Advanced Databases, in the Software Engineering program,
as recommended by the Faculty of Engineering, for inclusion in the 20152016 Undergraduate Calendar, as outlined in Appendix A.
The motion was carried.
Agenda Item I
3
V
FACULTY OF SCIENCE – MINOR CURRICULUM REVISIONS (Appendix B)
Undergraduate Council reviewed proposed minor changes to courses offered by the
Departments of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Biology, and Physics and
Astronomy. BIOCHEM 3X03 – Structure and Function of Macromolecules will continue
to be offered; minor changes have been made to BIOLOGY 2L06 – Experimental Design
in Biology and PHYSICS 1A03 – Introductory Physics.
It was duly moved and seconded,
that Undergraduate Council approve minor curriculum revisions to courses within
the Faculty of Science, for inclusion in the 2015-2016 Undergraduate Calendar, as
outlined in Appendix B.
The motion was carried.
VI
ESTABLISHMENT OF THE HONOURS BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK
PROGRAM (Appendix C)
Dr. Sinding explains that the current Combined Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Work
program (B.A./B.S.W.) is being replaced by an Honours Bachelor of Social Work program.
The Honours Bachelor of Social Work program does not currently exist at McMaster, it must
be approved as a new undergraduate degree program. However, the proposed new program
is in effect a modification of the existing B.A./B.S.W. program, whereby the Bachelor of
Arts component of the program is being eliminated. The existing program has recently
been reviewed and it has been determined that the Bachelor of Social Work portion of the
program meets the requirements for an honours program.
It was duly moved and seconded,
that Undergraduate Council approve, for recommendation to Senate, the establishment
of the Honours Bachelor of Social Work program, for inclusion in the 2016-2017
Undergraduate Calendar, as set out in Appendix C.
A member asked if the program has considered whether graduates of the current program
may question why they did not receive an honours degree. Dr. Sinding said that the program
had consulted with current students and graduates of the program and the most common
complaint was related to the workload of the program, not to that it is not designated an
honours degree.
In response to questions, Council heard that the precise date of the closure of the current
Combined Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Work has yet to be determined, but the
closure of the program and plan to phase it out will be brought forward in due course. The
intention is that students in the program will be offered the choice to stay in the existing
program or transfer into the new one, and the program will continue so that students already
in the program will graduate.
The motion was carried.
Agenda Item I
4
VII
CYCLICAL PROGRAM REVIEW – ENGLISH AND CULTURAL STUDIES
(Appendix D)
Members agreed, as this item was a late addition to the agenda and Dr. Searls Giroux
(who is also Co-Chair of the Quality Assurance Committee) was not present at the
meeting, to postpone reviewing the report until the next meeting, at which time it is
expected that a number of other Final Assessment Reports will also be on the agenda.
In response to questions, members heard that the results of Cyclical Program Reviews are
reported to Undergraduate Council from the Quality Assurance Committee and Undergraduate
Council may provide additional recommendations or comments to the Provost. The type
of recommendation could vary and would likely depend on the contents of the reports
themselves. Dr. Harrison, who is a member of the Quality Assurance Committee, pointed
out that the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) encourages the review of both
undergraduate and graduate programs together and then to submit only the relevant portions
of the Cyclical Program Review reports and recommendations for Undergraduate Council
and Graduate Council. Council agreed that some clarity of its role in the IQAP process
would be helpful.
VIII
OTHER BUSINESS
There being no other business, the meeting was adjourned at 3:02 p.m.
Agenda Item IV
1
Draft February, 2015
Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual
Observances (RISO)
1) PREAMBLE
McMaster University (the University) strives to be welcoming and inclusive of all
its members and respectful of their differences. Students, staff, and instructors
come from a range of backgrounds, traditions and beliefs. The University
recognizes that, on occasion, the timing of a student’s religious, Indigenous, or
spiritual observances and that of their academic obligations may conflict. In such
cases, the University will provide reasonable academic accommodation for
students that is consistent with the Ontario Human Rights Code, through
respectful, accessible, and fair processes.
Further information on McMaster University’s commitment to an inclusive
community and its legal obligations can be found on the website of the Office of
Human Rights & Equity Services (HRES) at: www.hres.mcmaster.ca.
2) SCOPE
This policy applies to all students enrolled in a course or program of study as
approved by the University Senate and who are seeking accommodation as a
result of academic obligations that conflict with their religious, Indigenous or
spiritual observances (RISO).
This policy does not apply to the following: course or program requirements,
residence, athletics, dietary restrictions, access to space, use of space, ablution,
and employment matters, including teaching assistantships.
Guidance on how to pursue requests not covered under this Policy may be
obtained from Faculty Offices, HRES, and/or Human Resources, or their respective
websites.
Agenda Item IV
2
3) GLOSSARY
For the purposes of this Policy:
Academic Obligations
Evaluative Exercises, including, but not
limited to, examinations, tests, labs,
assignments, placements, participation, and
seminars.
Accommodation
The provision of Alternative Arrangements
to meet Academic Obligations that uphold
Essential Requirements.
Alternative Arrangements
The manner in which the Academic
Obligations of the Student will be met.
Associate/Assistant Dean
One of: the Associate Dean, Assistant Dean
or Program Manager of the Faculty or
program in which the student is registered;
one of the Associate Deans of Graduate
Studies, depending on the program in which
the Student is registered; the Director or
Program Administrator of Arts and Science;
or the Assistant Director of the Centre for
Continuing Education.
Essential Requirements
The knowledge and skills that must be
acquired and/or demonstrated in order for
a Student to successfully meet the learning
objectives of the course or program.
Examinations
Registrar-invigilated final examinations.
Faculty
Depending on the program in which the
Student is registered, one of:
the Faculty of;
Agenda Item IV
3
Business (DeGroote School of Business),
Engineering, Humanities, Science, or Social
Sciences;
the Schools of;
Graduate Studies, Medicine, Nursing, or
Rehabilitation Science;
the Programs of;
Health Sciences Graduate,
Arts & Science, Medical Education,
Physician Assistant, or Midwifery Education,
Child Life Diploma;
Centre for Continuing Education.
Observance
A commemoration, tradition, or event of
religious, Indigenous or spiritual
significance. Please consult the Multi-faith
calendar on the HRES website.
Registrar
Scheduling and Examinations office
(Gilmour Hall, Room 114).
Student
An individual enrolled in a course or
program of study as approved by the
University Senate.
4) PURPOSE
This Policy provides guidance and consistency for members of the University
community in the requesting and provision of Academic Accommodation for
Observances including:
(i)
(ii)
principles that govern decision-making;
processes by which Students may request and receive
Accommodation;
Agenda Item IV
4
(iii)
(iv)
rights and obligations of Students, administrators and instructors;
dispute-resolution mechanisms available to Students.
5) PRINCIPLES
The University respects and accepts the self-declaration of beliefs made by
Students; however, it reserves the right to request documentation in cases where
documentation may assist in the Accommodation process or where there are
reasonable grounds to suggest the request is unfounded.
The University respects and accepts that the sincerely held beliefs of Students
who identify with the same religion or tradition may involve different
Observances.
Availing themselves of an Accommodation under this Policy does not prevent a
Student from seeking other Accommodations, such as those related to a
disability.
An Observance shall be interpreted to include reasonable travel and preparation
time for an Observance, in-class Observance requirements, or other similar
requests.
Students shall inform the University of their Accommodation needs, and
administrators and instructors shall inform Students of their Accommodationrelated decisions, in a timely way, as per this Policy.
It is the Student’s responsibility to arrange a means of obtaining lecture notes and
other pertinent information provided during classes missed as a result of
Accommodation.
The University encourages Students to participate in discussions regarding the
most appropriate Alternative Arrangements.
No unreasonable academic disadvantage shall occur as a result of exercising rights
under this Policy.
6) PROCESS
5
Agenda Item IV
A) Registrar-Invigilated Examinations (For all other requests, see Section B)
Responsibilities of Students:
Students shall complete and submit the RISO-Examination form, in person, to the
Registrar's office as soon as possible after receiving their Examination schedule,
and where possible, no later than ten working days prior to the commencement
of the Examination period.
Where the Student fails to meet the stated deadline, it may not be possible for
the Registrar to reschedule the Examination within the current Examination
period. In such cases, the Student shall contact the Faculty if they wish to request
Alternative Arrangements.
A Student who has a concern about a rescheduled Examination shall contact the
Registrar in a timely way.
Responsibilities of the Registrar:
Where the RISO-Examination form is submitted at least ten working days prior to
the commencement of the Examination period, the Registrar shall normally
inform the Student of their rescheduled Examination(s) five working days or more
prior to the beginning of the Examination period.
Where a Student fails to submit the form at least ten days prior to the
commencement of the Examination period, rescheduling within the Examination
period may not be possible. In such cases, the Registrar shall attempt to
reschedule the Examination(s) and, if successful, shall inform the Student of their
rescheduled Examination(s) in a timely way. Where rescheduling is not possible,
the Registrar shall inform the Student in a timely way and refer them to their
Faculty for possible Alternative Arrangements. (see section B)
B) For Academic Obligations (Excluding Registrar-Invigilated Examinations with
the possible exception of late notice requests)
Responsibilities of Students:
6
Agenda Item IV
The Student shall submit the RISO form i to their Faculty, electronically or in
person, normally within ten working days from the beginning of each term in
which they are anticipating a need for Accommodation. There may be occasions
where the date of an Observance is not yet confirmed or where an Observance is
unanticipated. In such cases the Student is advised to contact the Faculty as soon
as they become aware of the conflict to request Accommodation.
After submitting the RISO form, the Student shall receive confirmation from the
Faculty office, normally within five working days. The Student may be required to
develop an Accommodation plan in consultation with the Faculty office, in which
case they will be contacted by the Faculty Office in a timely way.
After receiving confirmation of receipt of the RISO form from the Faculty, the
Student shall contact the instructor(s) regarding the Alternative Arrangements as
soon as possible and no later than five working days prior to the date on which
the scheduling conflict will occur.
The Student is encouraged to discuss the Alternative Arrangements with the
instructor in a timely way.
A Student who is registered with Student Accessibility Services (SAS) may selfidentify on the RISO form if they would like a copy of the RISO form sent to SAS in
order to assist in the co-ordination of their Alternative Arrangements.
In situations where the Observance requires the Student to leave the class
temporarily, the Student shall discuss their needs with the instructor and develop
a mutually-acceptable arrangement where possible.
Responsibilities of the Faculty:
The Faculty shall send the days and/or times during which a Student anticipates a
conflict between Academic Obligations and Observances to the appropriate
instructors and copy the Student, normally within five working days of receiving a
completed RISO form.
If requested by the Student, the Faculty Office may provide Alternative
Arrangements in cases where, due to late notice, the Registrar has been unable to
reschedule an Examination during the Examination period.
Agenda Item IV
7
The Associate/Assistant Dean may deny an Accommodation where there are
reasonable grounds to believe the request is unfounded.
Responsibilities of Instructors:
At the Student's request, the instructor shall discuss with the Student the
Alternative Arrangements prior to making a determination. As soon as possible
after being contacted by the Student, the instructor shall inform the Student of
the Alternative Arrangements.
ALTERNATIVE ARRANGEMENTS
Instructors have a responsibility to provide Alternative Arrangements in a way
that is consistent with the principles in this Policy, and, where practical, to consult
with a Student who chooses to discuss the most appropriate Alternative
Arrangements.
Alternative Arrangements may include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
rescheduling an Academic Obligation,
providing an alternative Academic Obligation,
reweighting, providing that no one component of the course
becomes worth seventy-five per cent of the final grade or
greater.
extending a deadline.
Alternative Arrangements that are discouraged and should be considered only in
consultation with the Student and, if appropriate, the Chair of the department,
are as follows:
a.
b.
requiring the Student to submit an Academic Obligation prior
to the deadline,
requiring the Student to have someone else submit
their Academic Obligation on their behalf,
Agenda Item IV
8
c.
reweighting where one component of the grade becomes
worth seventy-five per cent of the final grade or greater.
RECORD-KEEPING
The Faculty shall forward the completed RISO form to the Registrar and may keep
a copy.
Information pertaining to a Student's Observance shall be held in strict confidence
and shall not be shared outside the Registrar or Faculty office without consent. If
requested by the Student, the information pertaining to an Observance shall be
removed from a Student’s file when they have completed their degree
requirements and are cleared to graduate.
DISPUTE RESOLUTION
At any point during the process, a Student or instructor may seek informal advice
or assistance from HRES.
In addition to HRES, any member of the University community may consult the
University Secretariat Office and/or the Ombuds Office for advice or guidance
with regards to the application of this Policy
When a Student is not satisfied with the Alternative Arrangements determined by
the instructor, the Student shall contact the instructor to discuss the matter.
If the Student is still not satisfied, the Student may request the intervention of
their Associate/Assistant Dean.
The Associate/Assistant Dean may attempt to settle the matter, and, if
unsuccessful, shall render a decision.
With the exception of process matters, decisions of the Associate Dean to deny
Accommodation may not be appealed under the Student Appeal Procedures.
9
Agenda Item IV
A Student seeking to challenge a decisions or action that may be a violation of
their Human Rights may do so under the University’s Anti-Discrimination Policy.
Anyone with questions or concerns regarding Human Rights is advised to contact
HRES.
iThe completed form shall include:
The names and dates of all Observances in the term that, to the best of the Student's knowledge at the time of
submission, may conflict with Academic Obligations.
The name of the instructor, course, and course code for all courses for which an accommodation is requested.
The RISO form does not ask for documentation.
Agenda Item V
A Review of MSAF and Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work
Background
The MSAF has been in place for over four years, and a committee was formed to evaluate its use and
determine how requests for missed academic term work could be improved. Committee members
(below) met twice to discuss this issue. Following these meetings the issue was discussed at Associate
Deans Group.
Rebecca Bishop (Program Administrator, Arts & Science)
Lynn Giordano (Assistant Dean, Social Sciences)
Paul Harrison (Associate Professor, Chemistry)
Rosanne Kent (Director, Student Wellness Centre)
Joseph McDermid (Professor, Mechanical Engineering)
Jacquie Osterman (Academic Advisor, Humanities)
Rodrigo Perez (MSU VP Education)
Melissa Pool (Registrar)
Linda Bentley Poole (Coordinator of Studies, Nursing)
Greg Rombough (Manager, Undergraduate Programs, DSB)
Joey Smith (Assistant Dean, Science)
Alastair Tracey (Instructional Assistant, Biology)
Sean Van Koughnett – Chair (Dean of Students)
Geraldine Voros (Lecturer, Social Sciences)
Maria White (Assistant Dean, Engineering)
Concerns were raised that the MSAF is being used not only as a mechanism to provide temporary relief
from academic work for short-term illnesses or personal situations, but as way for students to manage
deadline pressures. Concerns were also raised that there is an inconsistent approach and expectations
related to how Faculties, administrators, instructors and students use and understand the tool.
Conclusions and recommendations
The regulation governing requests for relief and the MSAF should be revised to introduce consistency,
clarity, and incentives to encourage appropriate use of the tool.





The MSAF should be used for both medical and non-medical (personal) situations.
Approval of the MSAF should be “automatic” (ie no documentation required).
Rules governing MSAF should be revised as follows:
o Re-define the timeframe within which the MSAF is valid - from five days to three days.
o Change the upper limit for when an MSAF can be submitted from “less than 30%” to
“less than 25%” of the course weight.
o Maintain the “one MSAF per term” limit.
Create an administrative tool to manage MSAF exceptions (ie limit access of the “MSAF
discretionary version” to administration).
Communicate the Academic Regulation “Requests for Relief from Missed Academic Term Work”
widely. Emphasize the need for academic integrity in making requests for relief.
Agenda Item V
Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work
Proposed calendar copy for Undergraduate Council - February 17, 2015
The University recognizes that students periodically require relief from academic work for medical or
other personal situations. This academic regulation aims to manage these requests by taking into
account the needs and obligations of students, instructors and administrators. It is the prerogative of
the instructor of the course to determine the appropriate relief for missed term work in his/her course.
Any concerns regarding the granting of relief should be directed to the respective Faculty Office.
Requests for relief should be made with a commitment to academic integrity in mind. Requests that
deviate from this commitment will be handled under the Academic Integrity Policy and Student Code of
Conduct, where appropriate.
1. Relief for missed academic work worth less than 25% of the final grade resulting from medical
or personal situations lasting up to three calendar days:
 Use the McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF) on-line self-reporting tool. No further
documentation is required.
 Students may submit requests for relief using the MSAF once per term.
 An automated email will be sent to the course instructor, who will determine the
appropriate relief. Students must immediately follow up with their instructors. Failure to do
so may negate the opportunity for relief.
 The MSAF cannot be used to meet a religious obligation or to celebrate an important
religious holiday.
 The MSAF cannot be used for academic work that has already been completed/ attempted.
 An MSAF applies only to work that is due within the period for which the MSAF applies, i.e.
the 3-day period that is specified in the MSAF; however, all work due in that period can be
covered by one MSAF.
 The MSAF cannot be used to apply for relief for any final examination or its equivalent.
See Petitions for Special Consideration.
2. For medical or personal situations lasting more than three calendar days, and/or
For missed academic work worth 25% or more of the final grade, and/or
For any request for relief in a term where the MSAF has been used previously in that term:
 Students must report to their Faculty Office to discuss their situation and will be required to
provide appropriate supporting documentation (see “Documentation Requirements” below).
 If warranted, the Faculty Office will approve the absence, and the instructor will determine
appropriate relief.
Documentation Requirements
If the reason for a request for relief is medical, the approved McMaster University Medical Form
covering the relevant dates must be submitted. The student must be seen by a doctor at the earliest
possible date, normally on or before the date of the missed work and the doctor must verify the
duration of the illness.
If the reason is non-medical, appropriate documentation with verifiable origin covering the relevant
dates must be submitted, normally within three working days.
Agenda Item V
In some circumstances, students may be advised to submit a Petition for Special Consideration (Form A)
seeking relief for missed academic work. In deciding whether or not to grant a petition, adequacy of the
supporting documentation, including the timing in relation to the due date of the missed work and the
degree of the student’s incapacitation, may be taken into account. Failure to do so may negate the
opportunity for relief.
If the petition is approved, the Faculty Office will notify the instructor(s) recommending relief. It is the
prerogative of the instructor of the course to determine the appropriate relief for missed term work in
his/her course.
Suggested language for course outlines:
In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the
Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar “Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term
Work”.
Agenda Item VI
REPORT TO UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL
FROM THE
UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL
CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS COMMITTEE
FOR APPROVAL
Establishment of a Joint Undergraduate-Graduate Certificates and Diplomas Committee
At its meeting on February 3, 2015, the Undergraduate Council Certificates and Diplomas Committee
reviewed a proposal to establish a Joint Undergraduate-Graduate Certificates and Diplomas Committee.
Currently, undergraduate-level certificate and diploma programs are governed by the Policy on
Certificates and Diplomas, graduate diploma programs are approved under the Institutional Quality
Assurance Process (IQAP), but there is no process for approving or assessing graduate-level certificate
programs. This is becoming a significant problem, particularly given there is an increasing interest in
developing graduate-level certificate programs. A review of the Policy on Certificates and Diplomas is
planned and a first step is the creation of a Joint Undergraduate-Graduate Certificates and Diplomas
Committee. At its meeting on February 13, 2015, Graduate Council approved, in principle and conditional
on approval by Undergraduate Council, the establishment of a Joint Undergraduate-Graduate Certificates
and Diplomas Committee.
The Undergraduate Council Certificates and Diplomas Committee now submits the proposal for the
establishment of a Joint Undergraduate-Graduate Certificates and Diplomas Committee, as set out in
the attached.
Undergraduate Council: FOR APPROVAL
February 24, 2015
Agenda Item VI
Schedule E
1.
UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL COMMITTEES
The committees of Undergraduate Council shall include, but shall not be limited to:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
the Executive Committee
the Awards Committee
the Curriculum and Admissions Committee
the Joint Undergraduate Council-Graduate Council Certificates and Diplomas Committee,
and
ad hoc committees and task forces as required
Except for the Executive Committee, each committee should be chaired by an elected faculty
representative, an Associate Dean, or a knowledgeable faculty member of the University. These
appointments shall be made by the Executive Committee. Each committee will consist of at least
five members, including the Chair of Undergraduate Council. A majority of the Committee members
shall be members of Undergraduate Council.
2.
(a) The Executive Committee shall consist of the Chairs of the Standing Committees of
Undergraduate Council, the Chair of Undergraduate Council and the Vice-Chair of Undergraduate Council.
(b)
The Chair of the Committee shall be the Chair of Undergraduate Council.
(c)
The Committee shall act for Undergraduate Council between Council meetings on matters
pertaining to Undergraduate Council. Such actions shall be reported for ratification at the
next regular meeting of Undergraduate Council.
(d)
The Committee shall nominate members to the committees of Council and, where otherwise
not expressly identified, shall nominate the Chairs thereof. The Committee may invite two
committee membership people whose expertise is sought, but who are not members of
Undergraduate Council.
3.
The Awards Committee shall be responsible for reporting to Undergraduate Council all
scholarships and academic awards winners and adjudicating recommendations for scholarship and
academic award winners as necessary. The Committee shall act as the guardian of standards and
non-discriminatory fairness in award descriptions and nominations, develop and enforce policy
regarding academic awards and adjudicate petitions regarding variances in the terms of awards.
4.
The Curriculum and Admissions Committee shall coordinate the curriculum changes from all
Faculties with a view to fairness to students, avoidance of conflicts, and equity among Faculties. It
shall also ensure that any new admissions policies or the revision of existing policies are consistent
with general University guidelines. Dialogue with Institutions that seek unique University admission
arrangements for their own students shall also be handled by the Curriculum and Admissions
Committee.
5.
(a)
The Joint Undergraduate Council-Graduate Council Certificates and Diplomas Committee
shall scrutinize proposals for new certificate and diploma programs and ensure their
conformity with the Policy on Certificates and Diplomas.
(b)
In addition to the membership outlined above, the Joint Undergraduate Council-Graduate
Council Certificates and Diplomas Committee will include the Chair of Graduate Council and
an equal number of representatives from Undergraduate Council and Graduate Council.
Revised: April 10, 2002, January 13, 2010
Agenda Item VI
Sample Membership for Joint Undergraduate Council-Graduate Council Certificates and Diplomas
Committee
Committee Chair: Elected faculty member, Associate Dean, or knowledgeable faculty member (ideally
alternating from Undergraduate Council and Graduate Council)
Chair of Undergraduate Council
Chair of Graduate Council
At least three members of Undergraduate Council
At least three members of Graduate Council
When appointing members to the Joint Committee maintaining a balance of students, faculty members
and administrators, as well as representation from all Faculties should be taken into consideration.
Consultants:
Director of the Centre for Continuing Education
Director of the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning
Associate Registrar and Graduate Secretary
(The Committee will be administered by the University Secretary.)
Agenda Item VI
JOINT CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS COMMITTEE
The Joint Certificates and Diplomas Committee is a joint committee of Undergraduate Council and
Graduate Council. The Joint Committee should be chaired by an elected faculty representative, an
Associate Dean, or other knowledgeable faculty member of the University. The Joint Committee will
consist of at least nine members, including the Chairs of Undergraduate Council and Graduate Council.
These appointments shall be made by the Executive Committees of Undergraduate Council and
Graduate Council. A majority of the members of the Joint Committee, excepting the Chairs of
Undergraduate Council and Graduate Council, shall constitute a quorum.
The Joint Certificates and Diplomas Committee shall scrutinize proposals for new certificate and diploma
programs and ensure their conformity with the Policy on Certificates and Diplomas.
Membership
Chair: An elected faculty member, Associate Dean, or other knowledgeable faculty member (ideally
alternating annually from Undergraduate Council and Graduate Council)
Chair of Undergraduate Council
Chair of Graduate Council
University Registrar
At least three members of Undergraduate Council
At least three members of Graduate Council
When appointing members to the Joint Committee maintaining a balance of students, faculty members
and administrators, as well as representation from all Faculties should be taken into consideration.
Consultants:
Director of the Centre for Continuing Education
Director of the McMaster Institute for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching and Learning
Associate Registrar and Graduate Secretary
(Administration for the Joint Committee will be provided by the University Secretary.)
UNIVERSITY SECRETARIAT
• Board of Governors
• Senate
Gilmour Hall, Room 210
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4L8
Phone: 905.525.9140, Ext. 24337
Fax:
905.526.9884
E-mail: [email protected]
http://www.mcmaster.ca/univsec
REPORT TO UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL
FROM THE
UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL AWARDS COMMITTEE
FOR APPROVAL
(a) Terms of Award
At its meeting of February 10, 2015 and by e-mail vote, the Undergraduate Council Awards
Committee approved the following for recommendation to Undergraduate Council.
(i)
Terms of Award for New Awards
The CFUW-Hamilton Memorial Prize in Political Science
The Order Sons of Italy - Trieste Lodge #4 Scholarship in Italian Studies
(ii)
Changes to Terms of Award
The CFUW-Hamilton Past President’s Prize
The CFUW-Hamilton Scholarship
The Clifford and Aline Smith Academic Grant
(iii)
Changes to Community Contribution Award Terms
The James A. Johnson Community Contribution Award
The Meena and Naresh Sinha Community Contribution Award
The Adam Sudar Printmaking Community Contribution Award
The Sam Watson Memorial Community Contribution Award
The Allan and Joy Williams Community Contribution Award
(iv)
New Bursaries
The Class of ’65, 50th Anniversary Bursary
The Engineering Bursary Fund
The Shoukri Engineering and Society Bursary
The Birch Island Physician Assistant Bursary
(v)
Changes to Terms of Bursary
The Beale-Lincoln-Hall Exchange Program Bursaries
The CFUW-Hamilton Bursary
The Ivey Bursary
The Undergraduate Council Awards Committee now recommends,
that Undergraduate Council approve the terms of award for two new awards, changes to
three terms of award, changes to five terms of community contribution award, four new
bursaries, and changes to three terms of bursaries, as set out in Attachment I.
1
FOR INFORMATION
(b) Award Name Changes (Attachment I)
At its meeting of February 10, 2015, the Awards Committee received, for information, one
award name change.
(c) Awards Value Changes (Attachment I)
At the same meeting, the Awards Committee received, for information, fifteen award value
changes.
(d) Awards Removed from the Undergraduate Calendar (Attachment I)
Also at the same meeting, the Awards Committee received, for information, two awards
removed from the Undergraduate Calendar.
(e) Award Recipients by Faculty (Attachment II)
At its meeting of February 10, 2015, the Awards Committee received, for information, the
2013-2014 In-Course and Graduand Awards Recipients Report
(f) Allocations of the H.L. Hooker and University Senate Scholarships (Attachment III)
At the same meeting, the Awards Committee received, for information, the 2013-2014 H.L.
Hooker and University Senate Allocations Report.
(g) Statistics for Awards by Application (Attachment IV)
Also at the same meeting, the Awards Committee received, for information, the 2013-2014
Awards by Application Report.
(h) Awards Not Allocated (Attachment V)
At its meeting of February 10, 2015, the Awards Committee received, for information, the
2013-2014 Awards Not Allocated List.
(i) 2013-2014 Exchange Scholarship Reports (Attachment VI)
At the same meeting, the Awards Committee received, for information, the 2013-2014
Exchange Scholarship Recipient Reports.
(j) 2014 Summer Travel Awards Reports (Attachment VII)
Also at the same meeting, the Awards Committee received, for information, Travel Reports
from the 2014 Summer Travel Awards recipients.
Undergraduate Council
February 24, 2015
2
Awards Report
Attachment I
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
PROPOSED NEW AWARDS FOR APPROVAL
SECTION E:
Awards for Graduating Students
The CFUW-Hamilton Memorial Prize in Political Science Prize
Established in 2015 by the members of CFUW-Hamilton on the occasion of the Club’s 90th anniversary. To be awarded to a
women student graduating from a Political Science program who has demonstrated outstanding academic achievement.
Value: $1,000 (50127)
SECTION G:
Academic Grants for Full-Time Students
The Order Sons of Italy - Trieste Lodge #4 Scholarship in Italian Studies
Established in 2014 by the Order Sons of Italy - Trieste Lodge #4, in Hamilton. To be awarded to a student who, in the judgment
of the Department of Linguistics and Languages, has demonstrated high academic achievement in Italian studies.
$1,000 (85086)
CHANGES TO AWARD TERMS FOR APPROVAL
The Canadian Federation of University Women (Hamilton) CFUW-Hamilton Past President’s Prize
Established in 1976 by the Past Presidents of the University Women’s Club of Hamilton which became the CFUW-Hamilton
on the occasion of the Club’s 50th anniversary. To be awarded to the woman student who has completed Level I and an
additional 60 - 85 units of a program in Engineering with the highest Cumulative Average.
Value: $800 $1,000 (30346) (B)
The Canadian Federation of University Women (Hamilton) CFUW-Hamilton Scholarship
Established in 1945 by the University Women’s Club of Hamilton, now the Canadian Federation of University Women CFUWHamilton. To be awarded to the woman student who attains the highest Sessional Average in the penultimate level of any
program.
Value: $1,500 $2,000 (30150) (B)
The Clifford and Aline Smith Academic Grant
Established in 2011 by Joyce and Ross Kelly in memory of Joyce’s parents, Clifford and Aline Smith, to provide support for
students who wish to pursue their educational goals. To be awarded to a student who is registered in at least a Level II
Honours English program in the Department of English and Cultural Studies, attained a high Sessional Average in Level I, and
demonstrates financial need.
Value: $800 (85045)
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC_02Feb.docx
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Awards Report
Attachment I
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
CHANGES TO COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD TERMS FOR APPROVAL
The James A. Johnson Community Contribution Award
Established in 1997 by the McMaster Social Sciences Society Executive Committee to recognize Dr. James A. Johnson, Dean
of Social Sciences (1989-97), for his outstanding service to the Faculty of Social Sciences and the broader campus community.
One award to be granted annually to a Social Sciences student enrolled in a program involving Anthropology, Economics,
Geography, Gerontology, Labour Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Social Work or Sociology who, in
the judgment of the appropriate selection committee in the Faculty of Social Sciences, has provided outstanding service to
McMaster University or the community-at-large. Preference will be given to students whose service has been undertaken
within the Faculty of Social Sciences at McMaster University. (80023)
THE MEENA AND NARESH SINHA COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD
Established in 1996 by Meena and Naresh Sinha. To be awarded to a student enrolled in the Faculty of Engineering who, in
the judgment of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering selection committee, has demonstrated superior
leadership or innovative skills through participation in either University and/or community activities. (80014)
THE ADAM SUDAR PRINTMAKING COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD
Established in 1997 in memory of Adam Sudar by his friends, this award fund will be used to assist students entering Level III
or IV of the Honours Art Program at McMaster who, in the judgment of the School of the Arts selection committee, have
demonstrated outstanding achievement or promise in the area of printmaking, and who have contributed significantly to the
School’s cultural presentations within the community. (80054)
THE SAM WATSON MEMORIAL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD
Established in 1996 by his wife Irene M. Watson and friends of Samuel Watson. One or two awards to be granted to students
enrolled in a program in Arts and Science who, in the judgment of the Arts and Science Program Admissions, Awards and
Review Committee selection committee, have made a notable contribution in the community-at-large through participation
in extra-curricular activities. (80002)
THE ALLAN AND JOY WILLIAMS COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD
Established in 1996 by Mary Williams (Class of ‘87), Anne Williams (Class of ‘89) and Ellen and Dan Walker in honour of their
parents. To be awarded to a student enrolled in any program who, in the judgment of the Department of English and Cultural
Studies selection committee, has made a notable contribution to campus and community life and demonstrates a lively
interest in English studies. (80019)
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Awards Report
Attachment I
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
PROPOSED NEW BURSARIES FOR APPROVAL
Submitted by the Office of Student Financial Aid & Scholarships
The Class of '65, 50th Anniversary Bursary
Established in 2015 by the Class of ’65 in honour of their 50th reunion. To be granted to students enrolled in any program
who demonstrate financial need. (91192)
The Engineering Bursary Fund
Established in 2014. To be granted to students in the Faculty of Engineering who demonstrate financial need. (91193)
The Shoukri Engineering and Society Bursary
Established by Dr. Mamdouh Shoukri, M.Eng. (Class of ’74), Ph.D. (Class of ’77), alumnus and former Dean of the Faculty of
Engineering at McMaster University. A variable number of bursaries to be granted to students enrolled in the Mechanical
Engineering and Society Program who demonstrate financial need. (91194)
Submitted by the Faculty of Health Sciences
The Birch Island Physician Assistant Bursary
Established in 2014 by R.B. (Biff) and Sue Matthews. To be awarded to students enrolled in the Physician Assistant Education
Program of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine who demonstrate financial need.
CHANGES TO BURSARY TERMS FOR APPROVAL
The Beale-Lincoln-Hall Exchange Program Bursaries
Established in 1996 by Arnold A. Beale in memory of his parents, F. Arnold Beale and Margaret S. Beale and, Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Gould Lincoln and Commander Harley H. Hall., U.S.N. To be granted to a student who demonstrates financial need
and is enrolled in a program in Commerce, Biochemistry, Biology, English, Chemistry, Earth Sciences, History, Materials
Science, Mathematics, Physics, Engineering Physics or Religious Studies who is participating in one of McMaster’s formal
exchange programs. Preference will be given to students who are participating in one of McMaster’s formal exchange
programs, and who have demonstrated a lively interest in the humanities and the human and social implications of scientific
developments. (90677)
The Canadian Federation of University Women (Hamilton) CFUW-Hamilton Bursary
Established in 1997 by the Canadian Federation of University Women (Hamilton) CFUW-Hamilton in support of the McMaster
Student Opportunity Fund initiative. To be granted to a student in any academic program who demonstrates financial need.
(90828)
The Ivey Bursary
Established in 1997 under the McMaster Student Opportunity Fund initiative. Preference will be given, if financial need is
demonstrated, to the recipient of The Ivey Scholarship. To be awarded to students who demonstrate financial need. (90872)
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC_02Feb.docx
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Awards Report
Attachment I
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
FOR INFORMATION
AWARD NAME CHANGES
The Certified General Professional Accountants of Ontario Scholarship
Value: $1,000 (30363)
AWARD VALUE CHANGES – Pull files and correct award names
The Deborah M. Brown Scholarship in Biomedical
Discovery & Commercialization
Was:
$10,000 (49002)
Now: $5,000 (49002)
The Feliks Litkowski Memorial Prize in Political Science
Was:
$800
Now: $850
The Chambers Academic Grant
Was:
$1,000 (85059)
Now: $2,000 (85073)
The Margaret Dixon Academic Grant
Was:
$800 (85016)
Now: $1,600 (85074)
The P.J. Ferguson Academic Grant
Was:
$800 (85022)
Now: $1,000 (85075)
The Frith Academic Grant for Nursing Excellence
Was:
$2,000 x 4 yrs.
Now: $3,000 x 4 yrs.
The Haller-Associated Med Academic Grant
Was:
$1,000 (85019)
Now: $2,000 (85076)
The Joyce and Ross Kelly Academic Grant
Was:
$800 (85029)
Now: $2,000 (85077)
The Maitland Memorial Academic Grant in
Was:
$800 (85041)
Now: $1,200 (85079)
The McKeon Academic Grant in Physics
Was:
$1,200 (85026)
Now: $2,000 (85080)
The Doreen Morrison Academic Grant
Was:
$800 (85021)
Now: $1,200 (85081)
The R.C. Newman Academic Grant
Was:
$800 (85023)
Now: $1,500 (85082)
The Pollock Family Academic Grant
Was:
$2,000 (85024)
Now: $2,500 (85083)
The Diane and Colin Wood Academic Grant in Business
Was:
$800 (85028)
Now: $1,800 (85084)
AWARD REMOVED FROM THE UNDERGRADUATE
CALENDAR
The Melissa Salvisburg Memorial Bursary (91135)
The Sport Coaching Prize (40112) $500
The Linardic Family Academic Grant
Was:
$800 (85025)
Now: $1,700 (85078)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
Contents
ARTS & SCIENCE........................................................................................................................................................... 2
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = ART&SCI: 113 ......................................................................................... 6
BUSINESS ..................................................................................................................................................................... 6
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = BUS: 213 ............................................................................................... 12
ENGINEERING ............................................................................................................................................................ 12
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = ENGIN: 358 ........................................................................................... 22
HEALTH SCIENCE........................................................................................................................................................ 22
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = H. SCI: 285 ............................................................................................ 29
HUMANITIES .............................................................................................................................................................. 29
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = HUMAN: 321 ........................................................................................ 40
NURSING .................................................................................................................................................................... 40
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = NURS: 58 .............................................................................................. 42
SCIENCE ..................................................................................................................................................................... 42
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = SCI: 716................................................................................................. 61
SOCIAL SCIENCES ....................................................................................................................................................... 61
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = SOC SCI: 263 ......................................................................................... 69
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = ALL: 2,327 ................................................................................................ 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
ARTS & SCIENCE
THE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE* (40085) VALUE: $800
VIVIAN TAM
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE ARTS & SCIENCE PROGRAM BOOK AWARD (40078) VALUE: $75
SPENCER WILLIAMS
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
THE ARTS & SCIENCE EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP (35002) VALUE: $1,000
MATTHEW JORDAN
H ARTS & SCI & MATH, LV 2
THE MARION BATES BOOK PRIZE (50034) VALUE: $85
OLIVIA DORIO
H ARTS & SCI & HISTORY, LV 4
THE BENTALL SCHOLARSHIPS (30281) VALUE: $1,500
ELI JANY
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 2
THE BRIEN SCHOLARSHIP IN PHILOSOPHY (30014) VALUE: $475
RYAN OLUP
H ARTS & SCI & PHILOS, LV 2
THE JOSEPHINE STAPLES BRIEN SCHOLARSHIP (40141) VALUE: $350
KARA HOUNSELL
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE TEN BROEKE-BENSEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30195) VALUE: $1,000
RYAN OLUP
H ARTS & SCI & PHILOS, LV 2
THE CLASS OF '38 SCHOLARSHIP IN HONOUR OF AMELIA HALL (30322) VALUE: $1,500
ZACHARY WILLIAMS
H ARTS & SCI & THTR&FLM, LV 2
THE CLASS OF '37 TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP IN ARTS & SCIENCE (35006) VALUE: $1,300
ALON CORET
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE CLASS OF 1953 50TH ANNIVERSARY SCHOLARSHIPS (30264) VALUE: $1,500
ARTHUR LU
H ARTS & SCI & MATH, LV 2
EILEEN CHURCH CARSON
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
LIAM CRUMMEY
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
THE CRANSTON PRIZE* (40011) VALUE: $175
CRISTINA SILVESTRI
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 4
THE MARGARET CUDMORE SCHOLARSHIP IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (30366) VALUE: $2,000
CHRISTINA VIETINGHOFF
H ARTS & SCI & POL SCI, LV 3
THE EDWIN MARWIN DALLEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30164) VALUE: $800
JULIEN GORDON
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
KORRYN GARVEY
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
LIANA GLASS
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
MAIA STEVENSON
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
LAUREN TIGNANELLI
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
PAWAN AULAKH
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
LOUELL TAYE
H ARTS & SCI & HISTORY, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE DAWSON PRIZE IN CHEMISTRY (50121) VALUE: $800
ROBIN HAYES
H ARTS & SCI & CHEM, LV 4
THE LAURA DODSON PRIZE (50031) VALUE: $200
EMILY DIES
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 4
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
EILEEN CHURCH CARSON
MATTHEW JORDAN
RABIA AHMED
JULIEN GORDON
KORRYN GARVEY
LAUREN TIGNANELLI
ERINN LEE
MAYSA HAQUE
JENNIFER AKERMAN
BEATRICE FLETCHER
IMAIYA RAVICHANDRAN
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & MATH, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & PEACE ST, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & ANTHRO, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
THE CHRISTINE FEAVER SCHOLARSHIP IN ECONOMICS (30402) VALUE: $1,000
JESSIE LU
H ARTS & SCI & ECON, LV 3
THE FEDERATION OF CHINESE CANADIAN PROFESSIONALS (ONTARIO) EDUCATION FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS (30163) VALUE: $1,000
SPENCER WILLIAMS
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
THE BARBARA FERRIER SCHOLARSHIP IN ARTS & SCIENCE (50089) VALUE: $500
SARAH SILVERBERG
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 4
THE BARBARA FRANCIS SCHOLARSHIP (30007) VALUE: $400
KARA HOUNSELL
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE GWEN GEORGE AWARD (40143) VALUE: $1,500
SPENCER WILLIAMS
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
THE GEORGE P. GILMOUR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30058) VALUE: $325
STEPHANIE DROUIN
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
MADELEINE BONDY
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 3
THE ROSS HUME HALL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30328) VALUE: $500
SAAD SYED
H ARTS & SCI & BIOCHEM, LV 2
THE DR. THOMAS HOBLEY PRIZE (30042) VALUE: $300
CHRISTINA VIETINGHOFF
H ARTS & SCI & POL SCI, LV 3
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
BRIANNA SMRKE
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 4
STEPHANIE DROUIN
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
KARA HOUNSELL
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
MICHAEL SKINNIDER
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
MATTHEW JORDAN
H ARTS & SCI & MATH, LV 2
MADELEINE BONDY
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 3
STEPHANIE WAN SAI CHEONG
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
ARJUN PATEL
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
SAFIYYA AHMAD
KIRA FELDMAN
CLAIRE BROWNE
ASHA BEHDINAN
ALON CORET
THE HERBERT M. JENKINS PRIZE (40096) VALUE: $150
SAFIYYA AHMAD
KEVIN MAYNARD
PROGRAM, LV
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & CHEM BIOL, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
THE DR. RONALD V. JOYCE "AMAZING" GRACE AWARDS (40145) VALUE: $2,500
STEPHANIE DROUIN
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE DR. RONALD V. JOYCE AWARDS FOR ATHLETES (40117) VALUE: $2,500
SOPHIA YKEMA
H ARTS & SCI & LINGUIST, LV 3
THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF HAMILTON-BURLINGTON, INC. COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80032) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
JOYCE CHAN
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 3
THE ERNEST ROBERT MACKENZIE KAY SCHOLARSHIPS (30254) VALUE: $800
SAAD SYED
H ARTS & SCI & BIOCHEM, LV 2
THE KIT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30095) VALUE: $200
MARGARET INMAN
H ARTS & SCI & ENGLISH, LV 3
THE SAM LAWRENCE PRIZE* (40048) VALUE: $175
JESSIE LU
H ARTS & SCI & ECON, LV 3
THE LINARDIC FAMILY ACADEMIC GRANT (85078) VALUE: $1,700
RYAN OLUP
H ARTS & SCI & PHILOS, LV 2
THE ELEANOR DORNBUSH MARPLES PRIZE IN THEATRE & FILM STUDIES* (40016) VALUE: $125
ZACHARY WILLIAMS
H ARTS & SCI & THTR&FLM, LV 2
THE JOHN AND HELEN MAXWELL SCHOLARSHIP (40162) VALUE: $2,500
JENNIFER WILD
H ARTS & SCI & CHEM BIOL, LV 4
THE CHARON BURKE MCCAIN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30305) VALUE: $500
ALLAN BROWN
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
PAWAN AULAKH
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE EVELYN RUTH MCLEAN SCHOLARSHIP IN CANADIAN HISTORY (40164) VALUE: $1,000
OLIVIA DORIO
H ARTS & SCI & HISTORY, LV 4
THE CONNIE O'SHAUGHNESSY MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40009) VALUE: $425
JOYCE CHAN
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 3
THE LES PRINCE RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30325) VALUE: $750
ELI JANY
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 2
THE PROVOST'S HONOUR ROLL MEDAL (30314) VALUE: MEDAL
ELI JANY
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE RAND MEMORIAL PRIZE OF CLASS '98 (40045) VALUE: $250
DEVRA CHARNEY
PROGRAM, LV
H ARTS & SCI & ENGLISH, LV 3
THE SATURN OF HAMILTON EAST COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80020) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
LAUREN TIGNANELLI
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
THE JOHN H. TRUEMAN SCHOLARSHIP* (40104) VALUE: $250
LOUELL TAYE
H ARTS & SCI & HISTORY, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
LORETTA KERR
CHARLES CHAMBERS
MAX LAZAR-KURZ
BENJAMIN BUCKLER
ELYSIA MARTINI
RABIA AHMED
ANDREW CASE
MYTHILI NAIR
RABEA PARPIA
RYAN PETERS
JOYCE CHAN
REBECCA CHANG
ANTHONY D'AMBROSIO
JULIE-ANNE MENDOZA
ALEXANDER COOMES
SEAN HABER
LAUREN GORFINKEL
MIA KIBEL
CHARLOTTE MUSSELLS
SAHAR RAZA
SOPHIA YKEMA
EMILY FONG
STEPHEN CLARE
AVERY LAM
KEVIN MAYNARD
ELLIOTT YEE
MARGARET INMAN
SAMANTHA ROSSI
RACHEL BRAIN
EVAN MITCHELL
ERIK BROWN
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & MATH, LV 2
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & RELIG ST, LV 3
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
H ARTS & SCI & BIOLOGY, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCI & ORIGINS, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCI & LINGUIST, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCI & PHYSICS, LV 3
H ARTS & SCI & BIOCHEM, LV 3
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
ARTS & SCIENCE 1, LV 1
H ARTS & SCI & ENGLISH, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 2
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
H ARTS & SCI & MATH, LV 3
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
BRIANNA SMRKE
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 4
NAZANEEN HOSSEINPOUR
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
THE ALLAN R. VEALL SCHOLARSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (40132) VALUE: $1,000
TINA CODY
H ARTS & SCI & ECON, LV 4
THE SAM WATSON MEMORIAL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80002) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
DEVRA CHARNEY
H ARTS & SCI & ENGLISH, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE YATES SCHOLARSHIPS (30171) VALUE: $800
ALLAN BROWN
PROGRAM, LV
H ARTS & SCIENCE, LV 3
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = ART&SCI: 113
BUSINESS
THE E. H. AMBROSE GOLD MEDAL (50014) VALUE: MEDAL
ALANNA DEWAN
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
THE ANDERSON ACADEMIC GRANT IN COMMERCE (85037) VALUE: $5,000
JAESEUNG LEE
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
DILAN YOGESH NAIK
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
DANIEL FAN
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
NAME NOT RELEASED
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
TAYLOR REID
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE EDGAR R. ASHALL SCHOLARSHIP (30162) VALUE: $200
FAN YANG
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE SCOTT BARTLETT MEMORIAL PRIZE (30134) VALUE: $200
ANDERSON GROSSMAN
WEIYANG HU
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE BASU MEDAL (50006) VALUE: $1,000
MATTHEW CIARDELLI
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
THE BATES RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30155) VALUE: $750
QUINN LEES
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE M. BANKER BATES SCHOLARSHIP (30102) VALUE: $1,400
JORDAN MEPHAM
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE BRANTFORD ALUMNI BRANCH COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80052) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
AMANDA NGUYEN
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE CERTIFIED GENERAL ACCOUNTANTS OF ONTARIO SCHOLARSHIP (30363) VALUE: $1,000
JOHN WIPPERMAN
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE MARIA CHAN SCHOLARSHIP FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES IN BUSINESS (35004) VALUE: $1,000
AMANDA LAW
COMMERCE, LV 2
REBECCA CUMMING
COMMERCE, LV 2
GABRIELA VASILEVA
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE CITY OF HAMILTON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT SCHOLARSHIPS (30383) VALUE: $800
HODA AHMED
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
DARCY OBERDING
COMMERCE, LV 2
DIANA VASQUEZ-CRUZ
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
CALOGERO SALVO
COMMERCE, LV 2
KRISTINA BARTENS
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
DEVAN LONG
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE ALFRED HARRY CROWHURST ACADEMIC GRANT (85055) VALUE: $1,000
BARKHA DHANDHA
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE EDWIN MARWIN DALLEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30164) VALUE: $800
JOSHUA BARRY
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
CASSANDRA KNAPMAN
COMMERCE, LV 2
ANDREW RAMADORI
COMMERCE, LV 2
BRITTNI URCIUOLI
COMMERCE, LV 2
ISABELLA LINARES RIANO
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
MITCHELL SALISBURY
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
CORY BRYCK
COMMERCE, LV 2
TONIANN SIMMS
COMMERCE, LV 2
ABHINANDAN GOYAL
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE JOHN DEERE LIMITED SCHOLARSHIP (50101) VALUE: $2,000
ERICA RASMUSSEN
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
THE DEGROOTE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ALUMNI UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP (30309) VALUE: $800
ANJA DJOGO
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE DELOITTE SCHOLARSHIPS (30268) VALUE: $1,500
JAESEUNG LEE
EMILY VAN DAELE
HUGH VICKERS
STEVEN DUECK
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
ALEXANDRA DUFFIELD
BRITTNI URCIUOLI
REBECCA SNARY
AMBER BEJKOSALAJ
SAMANTHA KOBAYASHI
MELISSA TURNER
TRISTAN MCLEOD
AMANDA LAW
ANNAMICCA SIVAKUMARAN
ALEXANDER GOACHER
REBECCA CUMMING
BENJAMIN CASHIN
WENYAN WANG
RAMLA HAIDARI
LUANA ZDROBA
ALI MASUD
BRIANNA BEACHEY
MANVIR SAINI
KYLE EDICK
AMANDA KELLN
SIJIA SHAO
XIN LI
PAOLO SANTAROSSA
DARYA SILKOVA
GABRIELA VASILEVA
KWAN LAU
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
WILLIAM RIDGWAY
XIMENA CARO VALDERRAMA
JESSICA DOOLITTLE
CONNOR FISCHER
CYNTHIA-RUTH ONGENDA NGENDA
INRAE DAVID
THOMAS KILBY
MAUREEN DOWNS
ARIANNA CONCIATORI
MAREN VAN ZUTPHEN
HUANXIN XU
JADE ELJABRI
QINGYI MAI
LUANA FARIA-FICHELLI
PROGRAM, LV
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE GUPTA FAMILY INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30311) VALUE: $1,500
XIAOKANG SHAN
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE RICK D. HACKETT SCHOLARSHIP IN HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR (30353) VALUE: $1,200
JULIA RATHS
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE HALTON ROTARY CLUBS / PYTHONS' PIT ENTREPRENEURSHIP SCHOLARSHIP (40173) VALUE: $2,800
AMANDA NGUYEN
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE HAMILTON PORT AUTHORITY SCHOLARSHIP (30227) VALUE: $1,275
STEVE VANBRUNT
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE DONALD HART SCHOLARSHIP (30386) VALUE: $500
ANDREW GUINDON
ABHINANDAN GOYAL
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE HAWKRIGG FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP IN BUSINESS (30256) VALUE: $7,500
TAYLOR GRENNING
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE ANNA MARIE HIBBARD SCHOLARSHIP (30361) VALUE: $1,500
QUINN LEES
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
BRAYDEN ROBINSON
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
JING MA
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BARKHA DHANDHA
COMMERCE, LV 2
AHMAD KHODR
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
JACOB WELLS
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
ZEJIANG CHEN
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
MINYUE JIANG
COMMERCE, LV 2
ALANA PAGE
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
SARA BENNIS
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
KAITLYN LASCELLES
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
ALANA BENTLEY
COMMERCE, LV 2
STEPHEN SMEGAL
COMMERCE, LV 2
NATALIE PORCO
COMMERCE, LV 2
RAFFAEL COLONNA
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
SHANNON LYONS
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ZIJUN WANG
CAMERON RICHARDSON
DANIEL SMITH
JOSHUA SANTUCCI
PATRICK SMUTEK
WAI LAM
BRENDAN ROCKEL
ANDERSON GROSSMAN
THE PAUL HYPHER PRIZE (40039) VALUE: $250
XIAOKANG SHAN
BARKHA DHANDHA
PROGRAM, LV
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE IODE HAMILTON MARTHA SERRELS ACADEMIC GRANT (85043) VALUE: $1,000
SARA BENNIS
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE BURTON R. JAMES MEMORIAL PRIZE (50008) VALUE: $200
ERICA RASMUSSEN
CORA SARDO
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
THE DR. RONALD V. JOYCE "AMAZING" GRACE AWARDS (40145) VALUE: $2,500
JORDAN CLEMENTS
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE TAYLOR LEIBOW ACADEMIC GRANT (85014) VALUE: $800
PATRICK SMUTEK
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE CLAUDE C. LISTER SCHOLARSHIP (30199) VALUE: $625
JING MA
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE WILLIAM MACKENZIE MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40053) VALUE: $425
KE XU
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
THE REHANA AND KHALID MASUD ACADEMIC GRANT (85050) VALUE: $1,000
KAITLYN LASCELLES
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE MCMASTER UNIVERSITY FUTURE FUND IN-COURSE AWARD (40151) VALUE: $1,800
DMITRI DOBROV
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE MCMASTER UNIVERSITY-HONG KONG FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30374) VALUE: $1,000
SHANHUA LUO
COMMERCE, LV 2
KE XU
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE TONY PICKARD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30172) VALUE: $425
DANIEL SMITH
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE PROVOST'S HONOUR ROLL MEDAL (30314) VALUE: MEDAL
QUINN LEES
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE PWC CANADA SCHOLARSHIP (30271) VALUE: $2,500
DMITRI DOBROV
QUACH DUONG
ALEXANDRA DUFFIELD
COURTNEY SMITH
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE BARRIE REID ACADEMIC GRANT (85018) VALUE: $800
DARCY OBERDING
PROGRAM, LV
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE SCOTIABANK COMMERCE EXCHANGE PROGRAM AWARDS (35019) VALUE: $2,500
REBECCA SNARY
COMMERCE, LV 2
AMBER BEJKOSALAJ
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
TRISTAN MCLEOD
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE JUDITH STERNTHAL SCHOLARSHIP (30414) VALUE: $2,000
REBECCA SNARY
LUKE CHARBONNEAU
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE DR. ANDREW SZENDROVITS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30265) VALUE: $450
CAMERON RICHARDSON
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE ROBERT TAYLOR SCHOLARSHIP IN COMMERCE (30355) VALUE: $1,000
REBECCA SNARY
COMMERCE, LV 2
LUKE CHARBONNEAU
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE KENNETH W. TAYLOR BOOK PRIZE* (40029) VALUE: $100
LUCAS HANNAN
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE FRANK AND CAROL TRISTANI SCHOLARSHIP (40168) VALUE: $2,500
CONNOR PREBIANCA
COMMERCE, LV 2
THE TROY FAMILY ACADEMIC GRANT (85009) VALUE: $2,000
AHMAD KHODR
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
JASKARN GREWAL
THOMAS KENEL
SHELBY ORME
VINCENT WONG
WEIYANG HU
LUCAS HANNAN
FAN YANG
LIANGJIE WANG
BRADEN HERSICS
RAJPREET KAUR
NICHOLAS DAVIES
KAIWEN LUO
HAYLEY DAWSON
DAYTEN STOCKFORD
ANDREW SILVA
DILAN YOGESH NAIK
DAVID CHEN
HAROLD CHIU
INNA FESHTCHENKO
JIANI HOU
MICHAEL PARISSE
LUYUE WANG
LEI SHI
AMBER GLASSFORD
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
MICHAEL CHUN
JIAXIANG WU
ANDREW DELIGIANIS
MARY KEREPCICH
CODY NASON
TONGCHEN QU
DANFEI DING
ASHLEY RIBEIRO
VANESSA HO
RACHEL MAK
HUY TRAN DUY ANH
LAUREN PEACOCK
DANIELLE HENDRICKSON
ABID SYED
OLALUWA OTUBELA
YUMNA AMJAD
JAKUB CHOLKO
ADRIAAN DE VISSER
ABIGAIL HOEKSTRA
HERMES LEE
TYLER MCEVOY
SHAUN SHREEDHAR
DANIEL FAN
ANDREW KWAST
GARRETT VAN ZANT
JIATONG WU
GETIAN ZHAO
RYAN ADAMS
TODD BARTA
HAYLEY MACNEIL
ANDREW GUINDON
YINQIAN JIANG
MICHELLE KACZUR
MICHAEL ADAIR
SEAN BRENT
YUAN LIU
MICHELLE HAALSTRA
SIYU CHEN
EVERETT CHILDS
MATTHEW GLEN
REED MAYBEE
DA TENG
PRABHJOT SEKHON
THE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS (60003) VALUE: $250
CHRISTOPHER JONES
PROGRAM, LV
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
COMMERCE, LV 2
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
KATIE MCKINNON
H B COMMERCE, LV 4
CHRISTOPHER RAPTOPOULOS
H B COMMERCE, LV 3
THE DIANE AND COLIN WOOD ACADEMIC GRANT (85084) VALUE: $1,800
ALANA PAGE
BUSINESS 1, LV 1
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = BUS: 213
ENGINEERING
THE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE* (40085) VALUE: $800
SYED ABBAS
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE ACI (ONTARIO CHAPTER) SCHOLARSHIP (30337) VALUE: $500
QIANCHAO LIANG
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
THE AIR LIQUIDE CANADA INC. SCHOLARSHIPS (30258) VALUE: $1,500
JULIE ARREY
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
KALIA AKKAD
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (60015) VALUE: $400
REBECCA OWEN
MANF ENG TECH, LV 3
THE A. H. ATKINSON PRIZE (30001) VALUE: $200
MAHMOOD KHARBUT
HAORAN ZHANG
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 3
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 3
THE DR. CHRIS BART SCHOLARSHIP (30399) VALUE: $5,000
CARMEN BRACHO
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE BENTALL SCHOLARSHIPS (30281) VALUE: $1,500
SIMON YOUNAN
ENG PHYSICS, LV 3
THE GORDON AND AGNEW (TWAMBLEY) BRASH ACADEMIC GRANT (85013) VALUE: $2,000
EVAN KIEFT
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
JIMMY NGUYEN
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ERIC EVELEIGH
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE CAE SCHOLARSHIP IN COMPUTING AND SOFTWARE ENGINEERING (30282) VALUE: $3,400
PEGGY LE
SOFTWARE ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ANDY QUACH
SFTWR ENG(GAMEDES)CO-OP, LV 2
THE CRISPIN CALVO SCHOLARSHIPS (30211) VALUE: $1,700
DANIELLA PALLISCO
MATLS ENG CO-OP, LV 2
THE WILLIAM F. CAMPBELL ACADEMIC GRANT (85010) VALUE: $6,000
MELISSA LAROCQUE
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN (HAMILTON) PAST PRESIDENT'S PRIZE (30346) VALUE: $800
DANDAN SONG
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
THE CANADIAN PROCESS CONTROL ASSOCIATION ACADEMIC GRANT (85063) VALUE: $2,500
JESSE VINE
B TECH 1, LV 1
THE CANADIAN RENEWABLE FUELS ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (40156) VALUE: $1,000
ZACHERY DICKSON
BIOTECHNOLOGY, LV 4
THE CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PRIZE (30016) VALUE: $50, MEDAL & CERTIFICATE
KEVIN PENNINGS
CHEM ENG & BIOENG, LV 4
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE CANADIAN SOCIETY OF CIVIL ENGINEERS (HAMILTON SECTION) PRIZE (40134) VALUE: PLAQUE
ALEXANDER SCIASCETTI
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
THE CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING MEDAL (50112) VALUE: MEDAL
BRADY SEMPLE
MECH ENG, LV 4
THE CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (CSCHE) SCHOLARSHIP (30362) VALUE: $600
MELISSA LAROCQUE
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE CANHEIT 2011 NATURE OF TECHNOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP (40153) VALUE: $1,000
DANIELA CORSETTI
CHEM ENG & SCTY CO-OP, LV 4
THE GRACE DOROTHY & WILLIAM P. CARPENTER AWARD (30284) VALUE: $1,500
DYLAN POST
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE CASEY FAMILY SCHOLARSHIPS (30347) VALUE: $1,000
KATHERINE BARCLAY
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 2
THE CHAMBERS ACADEMIC GRANT (85073) VALUE: $2,000
RYAN LARUE
BRANDAN BURR
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE CHANCELLOR'S GOLD MEDAL (30022) VALUE: MEDAL
DICKSON WONG
ELEC & BIOMED ENG, LV 3
THE NESMITH AND INGRID CHINGCUANCO ACADEMIC GRANT (85069) VALUE: $2,500
WU WENG
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
THE CLASS OF '44 SCHOLARSHIP (30224) VALUE: $1,500
KATHLEEN JOHNSON
CIV ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 2
THE DENTON COATES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40183) VALUE: $750
MICHAEL CHATZIDAKIS
MATLS ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
THE CRANSTON PRIZE* (40011) VALUE: $175
ANDREW OJO
CHEM ENG & BIOENG, LV 5
THE CREATECH SCHOLARSHIP IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (30351) VALUE: $1,000
STUART DOUGLAS
H COMPUTER SCIENCE, LV 2
THE DR. CAMERON M. CROWE SCHOLARSHIP (30412) VALUE: $5,000
MELISSA LAROCQUE
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE DR. RUDOLF DE BUDA SCHOLARSHIP (50100) VALUE: $1,900
GEORGE WILLIAMS
JASON PAQUETTE
COMP ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 5
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 4
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
QIYUE ZHANG
MOHAMMED KARODIA
ROBYN REIS
ABBIE ASUNMAA
KEVIN CARMONA-MURPHY
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 4
MATLS ENG CO-OP, LV 2
MATLS ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 2
SOFTWARE ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ERIN PRITCHARD
ANTHONY TAM
PROGRAM, LV
CIV ENG, LV 2
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE NEIL FORSYTH PRIZE* (40067) VALUE: $120
KAITLIN MARIANELLI
MATLS ENG&MGMT-NANO COOP, LV 4
THE GILMOUR MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40019) VALUE: $125
MATTHEW HO
CIV ENG, LV 4
THE GUPTA FAMILY INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30311) VALUE: $1,500
XING FANG
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
THE RUTH AND JACK HALL PRIZE (30131) VALUE: $225
MUSHARRAF AZEEM
H COMPUTER SCIENCE, LV 3
THE RONALD K. HAM MEMORIAL PRIZE (30128) VALUE: $125
CORY CHIANG
BRIAN JAMIESON
MATLS ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MATLS ENG&MGMT, LV 4
THE HAMILTON AND DISTRICT HEAVY CONSTRUCTION ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (40184) VALUE: $1,000
ANOJAN SIVALOGANATHAN
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 4
DARREN SINKE
CIV ENG, LV 4
THE HATCH SCHOLARSHIPS (20198) VALUE: $48,000/4 yrs.
KATHLEEN JOHNSON
EMMA BULLER
NICHOLAS BANDIERA
ROBERT MASTRAGOSTINO
MATTHEW EAST
DANIELLA PALLISCO
REBECCA GAGNON
KARI VANVLIET
WAI LAM
VICTORIA ZYMA
CIV ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
MECH ENG, LV 3
ENG PHYS&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 2
MATLS ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC & BIOMED ENG, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE HATCH ACADEMIC GRANT IN ENGINEERING (85008) VALUE: $2,000
OMAR ALI
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
MAISY JEFFERSON
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
ANNA PEKINASOVA
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 3
THE PROFESSOR TERRENCE HOFFMAN SCHOLARSHIP (30413) VALUE: $5,000
SOPHIA EMERSON
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
BHAVIT PATEL
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 3
AMANDA KELLY
ENG PHYS&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
OMAR ALI
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
KODY KAZDA
CHEM ENG CO-OP, LV 2
KYLE ARSCOTT
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 3
PAUL RICCIUTI
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
BEICHEN WU
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 3
LLOYD MACKINNON
CHEM ENG, LV 2
COLE VAN DE VEN
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
TAYLOR CHAPMAN
RYAN LARUE
JIAQI GE
MICHAEL ZAMBONI
CLEMENT EMMANUEL
MAISY JEFFERSON
WU WENG
AKASH SHAH
ALAN BOT
MILAN KORDIC
KEVIN PENNINGS
NICOLE MANGIACOTTE
JOHN BARBERIZ
YUTING CHAN
FARES BADR
JOSHUA HOEKSTRA
JACOB NOVIS
DAVID SAWERIS
YANG ZHAO
XINYUAN ZHANG
ARJUN ARAWINDAN
TOBIAS ABRAHAMS
ZHIXIANG CHI
MONICA SALIB
GERRIT WESTENBERG
EMMA O'NEILL
WEIYUAN BAO
JOSHUA FRIEDLAND
JUSTIN KAPINSKI
CHRISTOPHER LEE
QINGCHONG ZENG
BRANDAN BURR
YIHJWU HSIAO
STEPHEN WYNN-WILLIAMS
BRANDON WAGSTAFF
CAMERON WALLAR
MOUSTAFA KASEM
SHAYAN MUKHTAR
BYOUNGCHUL KO
NATHAN SMITH
PROGRAM, LV
MECH ENG&MGMT, LV 4
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ENG PHYS&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MECHATRON ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 3
ENG PHYSICS, LV 3
ELEC ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
CHEM ENG & BIOENG, LV 4
CHEM ENG & BIOENG, LV 4
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
CHEM ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG, LV 2
CIV ENG&SCTY, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENG PHYS&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MATLS ENG-NANOMATLS, LV 4
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
PROCESS AUTOMATION TECH, LV 4
B TECH 1, LV 1
THE JACK HOWETT ACADEMIC GRANT (85007) VALUE: $1,000
BENJAMIN SCHEFFEL
SAMUEL VIRTUE
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 2
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 4
THE INTERMETCO LIMITED SCHOLARSHIP (30072) VALUE: $600
BEICHEN WU
MATTHEW FEIGE
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 3
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
THE MUNICIPAL CHAPTER OF HAMILTON, IODE, MURIEL E. SKELTON AWARD (40036) VALUE: $150
SEAN STEL
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE IROQUOIS TROPHY (50028) VALUE: TROPHY
MATTHEW PINDER
MECH ENG&MGMT, LV 5
THE A.I. JOHNSON SCHOLARSHIP (30335) VALUE: $1,000
PETER ENG
SOFTWARE ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
THE DR. RONALD V. JOYCE AWARDS FOR ATHLETES (40117) VALUE: $2,500
KODY KAZDA
CHEM ENG CO-OP, LV 2
KEVIN BARRET
SFTWR ENG(GAMEDES)CO-OP, LV 4
THE GERALD L. KEECH MEDAL (50069) VALUE: MEDAL
ABDUL MUHAMMAD
H COMPUTER SCI CO-OP, LV 4
THE JOYCE AND ROSS KELLY ACADEMIC GRANT (85077) VALUE: $2,000
ALI WASEEM
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE LORNA AND ALVIN KINNEAR SCHOLARSHIP (30324) VALUE: $3,000
ALEXANDRE D'SOUZA
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE KUDSIA FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP (30357) VALUE: $2,000
DICKSON WONG
ZHUORAN LI
ELEC & BIOMED ENG, LV 3
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
THE RAY LAWSON SCHOLARSHIPS (30126) VALUE: $275
PAUL RICCIUTI
KALIA AKKAD
MICHAEL ZAMBONI
BRANDON WAGSTAFF
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
ENG PHYS&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
ENG PHYS&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
THE MAPS GOLD MEDAL (50076) VALUE: MEDAL
ANDREW NORGATE
MICHAEL DIGGINS
COMPUTING & INFO TECH, LV 4
COMPUTING & INFO TECH, LV 4
THE MATTHEWS HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30157) VALUE: $750
YANJIE XI
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE JOHN MAYBERRY SCHOLARSHIP (30262) VALUE: $1,000
BENJAMIN MIETHIG
COLIN O'BRIEN
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE WILLIAM J. MCCALLION SCHOLARSHIPS (60004) VALUE: $250
MARK COENEN
JESSE MCKNIGHT
DAVID RAGBEER
HENRY ORMEL
ENERGY ENG TECH, LV 4
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 4
MANF ENG TECH, LV 3
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 4
THE JOHN B. MCDOUGALL ACADEMIC GRANT (85039) VALUE: $1,000
GARIK PATTERSON
ENG PHYSICS, LV 3
ROBERT VAN GEMEREN
ENG PHYS&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
THE MCMASTER UNIVERSITY FUTURE FUND IN-COURSE AWARD (40151) VALUE: $1,800
ALEXANDER SCIASCETTI
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE SIMON MCNALLY SCHOLARSHIP (30139) VALUE: $650
EMILY FARQUHARSON
KATHLEEN JOHNSON
PROGRAM, LV
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 2
THE RONALD WILLIAM MERKEL TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP IN ENGINEERING (35015) VALUE: $2,500
KEVIN DE FRANCE
CHEM ENG & BIOENG CO-OP, LV 5
THE KRISTINA FERRIS MILNER ACADEMIC GRANT (85044) VALUE: $1,500
ERIC DAIGLE
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 2
THE F. A. MIRZA SCHOLARSHIP (40100) VALUE: $250
OMAR ALI
MAISY JEFFERSON
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE ROBERT JOHN MORRIS COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80024) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
VANESSA RAPONI
MATLS ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE MOTOROLA SOFTWARE ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP (30252) VALUE: $1,500
DEVON GASPAROTTO
SFTWR ENG(GAMEDES)CO-OP, LV 2
IRIS NG
SOFTWARE ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE RICHARD NEWMAN ACADEMIC GRANT (85082) VALUE: $1,500
JOHN BARBERIZ
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
THE LYNN NICKERSON '97 ACADEMIC GRANT (85061) VALUE: $2,000
HIU TUNG HO
MATLS ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
THE ONTARIO PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS FOUNDATION FOR EDUCATION GOLD MEDAL (50005) VALUE: MEDAL
GUILLAUME GAUTHIER
ENG PHYSICS, LV 4
THE ONTARIO PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS FOUNDATION FOR EDUCATION UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS (40124) VALUE: $1,250
JASON MUNRO
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 3
JOSHUA SEGEREN
MECHATRON ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
ALEXANDER SCIASCETTI
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
NICHOLAS BANDIERA
MECH ENG, LV 3
THE F. W. PAULIN SCHOLARSHIP (30052) VALUE: $1,500
ANNA PEKINASOVA
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 3
THE PCL SCHOLARSHIP IN ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT (30359) VALUE: $1,000
JAMES DI DONATO
ELEC ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
THE POLLOCK FAMILY ACADEMIC GRANT (85083) VALUE: $2,500
SOPHIA EMERSON
NAVID RAHMANI
SHAWN AULTMAN
ANATOLIY SAFARALIYEV
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE PROVOST'S HONOUR ROLL MEDAL (30314) VALUE: MEDAL
EMILY FARQUHARSON
DICKSON WONG
SIMON YOUNAN
LUKE BOIVIN
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC & BIOMED ENG, LV 3
ENG PHYSICS, LV 3
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
GUILLAUME GAUTHIER
ZHUORAN LI
KATHLEEN JOHNSON
ANOJAN SIVALOGANATHAN
PROGRAM, LV
ENG PHYSICS, LV 4
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 4
THE HERBERT A. RICKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30391) VALUE: $2,500
EMILY FARQUHARSON
LUKE BOIVIN
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE STANLEY ROBERTSON SCHOLARSHIP (40148) VALUE: $2,500
AMANDA KELLY
CARMEN BRACHO
ENG PHYS&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE SCHULICH LEADER SCHOLARSHIP (20259) VALUE: $60,000/4 years
LIAM LAWRENCE
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
RAMI SAAB
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
THE SHELL CANADA PRIZES IN ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT (50049) VALUE: $300
DAVID LAJAMBE
CHEM ENG&MGMT, LV 5
ERIC SALT
MECH ENG&MGMT, LV 5
JAMES SCOTT
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 5
BARRY MASON
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 5
ANDREW WALKER
ENG PHYS&MGMT CO-OP, LV 5
THE SHELL CANADA SCHOLARSHIPS IN ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT (30137) VALUE: $1,100
JOSEPH CIRTWILL
MECH ENG&MGMT, LV 4
DANIEL CHAPUT
MECHATRON ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
JEFF ONG
MECHATRON ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
HAODING LI
ELEC ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
IAN WIGBOLDUS
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
THE SOCIETY OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY MERIT AWARD (50060) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
DAVID LAJAMBE
CHEM ENG&MGMT, LV 5
THE ROBERT SOWERBY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40108) VALUE: $150
ZACHERY DICKSON
BIOTECHNOLOGY, LV 4
THE STANTEC CONSULTING LTD. ENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP (30315) VALUE: $2,500
MAX WALLEN
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE MABEL STOAKLEY SCHOLARSHIP (40150) VALUE: $425
JULIE ARREY
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
THE MARK JOHN STOJCIC SCHOLARSHIP (30242) VALUE: $1,800
HIU TUNG HO
CORY CHIANG
MICHAEL CHATZIDAKIS
MATLS ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
MATLS ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MATLS ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
THE PATRICK TAN ACADEMIC GRANTS (85049) VALUE: $2,000
COLE VAN DE VEN
PEGGY LE
AKASH SHAH
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
SOFTWARE ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE DR. DAVID THOMPSON SCHOLARSHIP (30400) VALUE: $5,000
JAMESON WONG
PROGRAM, LV
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
THE MICHAEL THOMSON MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE (40035) VALUE: $50
WENJUAN LU
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 4
FARES BADR
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
STEFAN DUMITRESCU
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
THE TINNERMAN PALNUT ENGINEERED PRODUCTS SCHOLARSHIP IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (30344) VALUE: $3,000
YANJIE XI
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
THE UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (40118) VALUE: $800
NICHOLAS BOISJOLI
ARWA SHEIKHALZOOR
MANF ENG TECH, LV 3
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
LIAM LAWRENCE
RYAN CORNFIELD
ALEXANDRE D'SOUZA
YUJIE HU
DENNIS KERLING
MATTHEW KONSKI
SEAN STEL
MATTHEW FEIGE
YAKSH PATEL
MAXIM PODDOUBNYI
MARINA GHTAS
NICHOLAS GIUNTI
GRAEME BROWNING
PETER BARTOSIK
ANDREW EKLADIOUS
DAVID PHILPOTT
ADAM ROSE
RAMI SAAB
JACOB GAREAU
STEVEN PERRICONE
TREVOR ABLETT
THANUS MOHANARAJAN
CHARLOTTE LEWIS
DEREK SAVERY
EMMA BULLER
YOUSSEF KHAKY
ALEXANDER OTTO
ZACHARY VAN GALEN
TIANXIAO YANG
SPENCER CALDWELL
ROBIN NG
REENA FABROS
THOMAS PHAN
JOSE MERCADO MALABET
FADY MAKRAM ABDEL-MALI
OMAR ELMOFTY
BHAVESH KAKWANI
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CHEM ENG CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 3
SFTWR ENG(GAMEDES)CO-OP, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
MECH ENG, LV 2
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 3
SFTWR ENG(GAMEDES)CO-OP, LV 4
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
MECHATRON ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CHEM ENG & BIOENG CO-OP, LV 4
BIOTECHNOLOGY, LV 2
COMP ENG CO-OP, LV 2
MECH ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
SOFTWARE ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
STEFAN DUMITRESCU
HAOXIANG LAI
KRIFFIN TRUONG
MUSTAFA RASHID
NATHAN BUCCELLA
MICHAEL DIMMICK
MATTHEW LI
MAHMOOD KHARBUT
CURTIS MACINTYRE
RYAN SCOTT
MUSHARRAF AZEEM
GARRETT PALIN
PATRICK FINNISS
BENJAMIN SCHEFFEL
JOSHUA FEATHER
SHIVAD BHAVSAR
JOHN GILLIES
ZICHEN JIANG
VERENA KOSTANTINE
CHERK LEE
ZHIRUO LIU
PRATEEK MATHUR
BRIAN PHUNG
DOUGLAS DODMAN
ERIC DAIGLE
PARAS ALI
BRIANNA HUSK
EDWARD SULLIVAN
SHANE DOWNIE
MOHAMMAD MALIK
JACQUELINE FOSSENIER
MOHSIN KHAN
SALMA HINDY
SAIF SHABAN
ERIC DYER
MATTHEW AGOSTINI
ALI AZAD
VIJAY BALA
YI OU
ADAM RANKIN
ALEC TARABORRELLI
LINDSAY VASILAK
TINYU WONG
KAIJIE ZHANG
ANDREW ARAN
ROTIMI FADIYA
CODY FRAM
ZAHRAA MAZINIKHALIL
ERICA WILSON
CLARE XU
ARTHUR DOMENICUCCI
GURTAJ MALHI
HAORAN ZHANG
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
CHEM ENG, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
CHEM ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 3
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 2
H COMPUTER SCIENCE, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 2
MATLS ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 2
B TECH 1, LV 1
COMPUTER SCI 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
COMPUTER SCIENCE 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
AUTOMOTIVE & VEHICLE, LV 4
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 2
MECHATRON ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
SOFTWARE ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
BIOTECHNOLOGY, LV 4
BIOTECHNOLOGY, LV 2
CHEM ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
COMPUTER SCI 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
COMPUTING & INFO TECH, LV 4
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG, LV 2
PROCESS AUTOMATION TECH, LV 4
CIV ENG&INTL ST CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
CIV ENG CO-OP, LV 3
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 20 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
SARAH CHISTE
JING YUAN
KANISHKA GOEL
STEVEN DI PIETRO
PHILIP GABARDO
QIANCHAO LIANG
MICHAEL POPOVICH
NICHOLAS AUBRY
CAMERON CARRUTHERS
LEANNE DIAS
JOHNATHAN DIMATTEO
XIAOYU FENG
YAFAN LIU
JACKSON QUANG
KERIANNE RIKLEY
ZHI WANG
ROBERT ADAMS-MCGAVIN
HELEN DORRINGTON
KAI FU
JOHN-PAUL IADIPAOLO
TZU-CHIEH KAI
AMJAD SKEIK
PRADEEP VENKATESH
ERIC TENUTA
CHRISTOPHER GAUTHIER
CHENHE LI
PAULA MACDONALD
SANJIT MANN
ROBERT MASTRAGOSTINO
LIAM KOPP
JINGJING CHEN
BENJAMIN KINSELLA
RYAN VOOGJARV
SHIRLEY CHIU
USMAN MEHMOOD
YI WANG
MICHAEL MARSHALL
NURUL MAT KAMIL
JIA YANG
GARIK PATTERSON
SAMUEL VIRTUE
TYLER ELLIS
MATTHEW EAST
RYAN HALFYARD
HENRY FRANKIS
IAN VANDERGRIENDT
ASHLEY GENERAL
AARON PITCHER
MARCUS JACOB
THE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS (60003) VALUE: $250
REBECCA OWEN
KRYSTOPHER DEMERS
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
CIV ENG&INTL STUDIES, LV 4
AUTOMOTIVE & VEHICLE, LV 4
SOFTWARE ENG CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
SOFTWARE ENG CO-OP, LV 3
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 4
MECH ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
MANF ENG TECH, LV 3
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
ENG PHYSICS, LV 3
CHEM ENG & BIOENG, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 3
BIOTECHNOLOGY, LV 2
COMPUTING & INFO TECH, LV 4
MATLS ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 2
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 2
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 3
MECH ENG&SCTY CO-OP, LV 4
AUTOMOTIVE & VEHICLE, LV 2
ENG PHYS&SCTY CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ELEC & BIOMED ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ELEC ENG&MGMT CO-OP, LV 2
CHEM ENG, LV 2
ENGINEERING 1 CO-OP, LV 1
COMPUTER SCI 1 CO-OP, LV 1
COMPUTER ENG, LV 3
ELEC & BIOMED ENG, LV 3
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
ENG PHYSICS, LV 3
ENG PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 4
CHEM ENG & MGMT CO-OP, LV 4
CIV ENG&MGMT, LV 2
MATLS ENG CO-OP, LV 2
ENG PHYSICS, LV 2
MECH ENG CO-OP, LV 2
H COMPUTER SCIENCE, LV 3
ELEC ENG CO-OP, LV 3
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 3
MANF ENG TECH, LV 3
ENERGY ENG TECH, LV 3
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 21 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PATRICK MEAGHER
JONATHAN SKINNER
JOHN BOEREMA
JAMES LUK
SERGIO VENIER
LAURA SEELY
PROGRAM, LV
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 4
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 4
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 4
CIV ENG INFRASTRUCT TECH, LV 3
COMPUTING & INFO TECH, LV 4
COMPUTING & INFO TECH, LV 4
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
MATTHEW GARDNER
MECHATRON ENG CO-OP, LV 4
ERINN VAN WYNSBERGHE
ENG PHYS&SCTY, LV 5
THE VALE CANADA LTD. SCHOLARSHIP IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING (30274) VALUE: $1,900
NAVID RAHMANI
ENGINEERING 1, LV 1
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = ENGIN: 358
HEALTH SCIENCE
THE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE* (40085) VALUE: $800
WILLIAM LANGLEY
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
THE AUBURN INDUSTRIAL SERVICES COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80037) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
SARPREET KAHLON
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCES (HONOURS) PROGRAM SCHOLARSHIP (30320) VALUE: $1,000
KAIWEN SONG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
MEGAN SCHLORFF
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
KRISTA KRUJA
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
THE BENTALL SCHOLARSHIPS (30281) VALUE: $1,500
AVRILYNN DING
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE EDWIN MARWIN DALLEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30164) VALUE: $800
XI YUAN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
AMBIKA TEJPAL
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
SHARON YEUNG
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
THE EDWARD FRANK DAVIS MEMORIAL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80060) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
AMEIR MAKAR
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
JESSIE PENG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
KELSEY VERCAMMEN
EMILY FEJTEK
CHRISTINA NEW
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
B HTH SCI H (CHILD HTH), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
THE FRENCH GOVERNMENT BOOK PRIZE (40017) VALUE: BOOK
ASHLEY CHU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE GWEN GEORGE AWARD (40143) VALUE: $1,500
MAYLYNN DING
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 22 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE HANS GROH ACADEMIC GRANT (85047) VALUE: $1,000
KAI YI WU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
THE HAMILTON INDUSTRIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30165) VALUE: $800
VICKI KAM
B HTH SCI H (CHILD HTH), LV 2
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
JOEL GAMBLE
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
MATTHEW JESSOME
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
SEOYEON KANG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HSIN-YEN LIU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
JULIAN DAZA VARGAS
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 2
ROBERT DE SANTIS
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
CLAUDIA FRANKFURTER
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
MATTHEW GOT
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
ANDREW KAMPHUIS
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
CHRISTOPHER OLESOVSKY
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
KAI YI WU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
ERIN FENNELL
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
MELISSA LEE
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HARKANWAL RANDHAWA
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
NICOLA SAHAR
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
GRACE ZHANG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
YU HANG ZHENG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
MATTHEW NEWMAN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
SEAN XIA
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
VANESSA AVERSA
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
MATTHEW DRIEDGER
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
AMEIR MAKAR
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
MUZAMMIL MEMON
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
CAROLYN TAN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
JOO YOON
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HANG YU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
GREGORY CHEN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
SAHAR FARSHCHIZARABI
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
LAUREN HOPHING
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
XIAOTIAN HU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
JIYEH JOO
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
DANIELLE MESCHINO
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
CHRISTOPHER RUSSELL
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
CATHERINE YANG
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
LOUISE CHONG
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
LEANDRA GALLORO
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HANIYA KHAN
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
WILLIAM LANGLEY
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
SE-WEON PARK
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 4
TERENCE TANG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
KIM VO
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
JULIANNE ZANDBERG
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
VICTORIA MAICH
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
ARUN PARTRIDGE
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
ANNETTE WONG
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
LI YIN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 23 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ARUNIMA SIVANAND
JASMINE WASLOWSKI
MINA ALIKOUZEHGARAN
KATELYN COLWELL
PROGRAM, LV
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
THE DR. RONALD V. JOYCE "AMAZING" GRACE AWARDS (40145) VALUE: $2,500
YUAN YI DONG
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 2
THE MARY E. KEYES RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30299) VALUE: $750
AVRILYNN DING
HSIN-YEN LIU
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE J. BEVERLY KRUGEL SCHOLARSHIPS IN GERMAN LANGUAGE STUDIES (30364) VALUE: $1,500
FRANZISKA MILLER
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE GARY LAUTENS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40146) VALUE: $4,000
MAXWELL TRAN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE SAM LAWRENCE PRIZE* (40048) VALUE: $175
HAYDON LUTZ
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
THE ALEC JOHN ROYSTON MACMILLAN MEMORIAL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80012) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
SHARON YEUNG
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
THE ELIZABETH MOSGROVE SCHOLARSHIP (40147) VALUE: $1,500
MATTHEW JESSOME
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE PIONEER ENERGY LP LEADERSHIP COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80025) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
SHAMINI SELVAKUMAR
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
SAEHA SHIN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE GORDON AND JANE PRICE COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80048) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
MUZAMMIL MEMON
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE PROVOST'S HONOUR ROLL MEDAL (30314) VALUE: MEDAL
KAI CHEN
AVRILYNN DING
JOEL GAMBLE
MATTHEW JESSOME
SEOYEON KANG
HSIN-YEN LIU
SYED RIZVI
JULIAN DAZA VARGAS
ROBERT DE SANTIS
CLAUDIA FRANKFURTER
MATTHEW GOT
ANDREW KAMPHUIS
CHRISTOPHER OLESOVSKY
CLARKE COLE
ERIN FENNELL
MELISSA LEE
NICOLA SAHAR
GRACE ZHANG
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 4
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 24 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
HEDYEH ZIAI
SHREYAS GANDHI
MATTHEW NEWMAN
KATHERINE STECKHAM
SEAN XIA
NATASHA EARDLEY
SHU LIANG
OLIVIA COOK
NICHOLAS TIMMERMAN
PRIYA SAYAL
ARNAV AGARWAL
SUKRITI BHARDWAJ
SAJJAD TAVASSOLY
REBECCA STEPITA
MARLIE VALENCIA
PROGRAM, LV
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
THE RETIRED TEACHERS OF ONTARIO HAMILTON/HALDIMAND DISTRICT PRIZE (40047) VALUE: $200
PAUL AZZOPARDI
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE DOMINIC ROSART SCHOLARSHIP (20132) VALUE: $20,000/4 years
BEN LI
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE ROTARY CLUB OF BURLINGTON CENTRAL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80041) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
CALVIN LO
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
THE ROTARY CLUB OF HAMILTON SCHOLARSHIP (30168) VALUE: $575
AMBIKA TEJPAL
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE ROTARY CLUB OF HAMILTON COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80043) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
AMBIKA TEJPAL
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE SATURN OF HAMILTON EAST COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80020) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
JIYEH JOO
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE HILDA SAVAGE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30166) VALUE: $500
JOEL GAMBLE
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE FEDOR SCHNEIDER SCHOLARSHIP IN ITALIAN (30393) VALUE: $2,000
ANNE-SOPHIE LARAMEE
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
THE SOMERVILLE SCHOLARSHIPS (30169) VALUE: $800
RUSHIL CHAUDHARY
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE ROGER TRULL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80053) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
ARNAV AGARWAL
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
THE UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (40118) VALUE: $800
SOPHIE POZNANSKI
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
BONNIE CHEUNG
HUSAYN GULAMHUSEIN
NAVNEET NATT
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 25 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
BRENDAN WONG
ERIC YUNG
PAUL AZZOPARDI
MING BI
JESSICA BUI
VALERIE CUI
MAYLYNN DING
NICOLE FALZONE
RYAN GOTESMAN
MUSKAAN GURNANI
ELLEN HE
XUE JIANG
BEN LI
JEFFREY MAH
FIZZA MANZOOR
YVGENIY OPARIN
MARKO POPOVIC
GAEUN RHEE
AYESHA RIZWAN
SOHAIL SARDAR
MICHAEL XIE
SARAH ZHOU
RUNTING CAI
ASHLEY CHU
SHAADY GARAS
JOSHUA KOENIG
VICTOR LAM SHIN CHEUNG
AALIM JIWA
RUIJUN WANG
WASEEM HIJAZI
KARIM MITHANI
AMANDA TOUFEILI
JASNEET DHALIWAL
ANNIE CHEUNG
LI HAO
JENNY HOANG
JIN KIM
YASMEEN MANSOOR
POURYA MASOUDIAN
SAMIR NAZARALI
KIMIA SOROURI
RAFAE WATHRA
ANSON WONG
MAGDALENE AU
INNA BERDITCHEVSKAIA
PRIYANK BHATNAGAR
ADRIAN CHAN
EMILY DEHAAS
MIMI DENG
YUXI GE
ALLISON GEMMILL
OLENA GENIS
AMANDA HEMPEL
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 2
B HTH SCI H (CHILD HTH), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (CHILD HTH), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 2
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 26 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
MATTHEW HUGHSAM
YALDA KARIMI
JIIN KIM
MATHURA MAHENDREN
NABIL MITHA
LEEN NAJI
KIMBERLY NG
ADITYA NIDUMOLU
LILY PARK
RAHEEM REMTULLA
NENSI RUZGAR
NIKHITA SINGHAL
ARULMOLLIE SIVARAM
CHEUK TAM
ANDREA TENCH
MISHAAL UMAR
ZHAO ZHANG
YUCHEN ZHANG
ZI ZHAO
ZHENG ZHOU
RUTH CHIU
STEPHAN ORESKOVICH
MATTHEW SKELLY
LINGHONG ZHOU
VERDAH BISMAH
NATHAN GAMBLE
ANNIE ZHU
HARRY CHANDRAKUMARAN
JACQUELINE CHEUNG
YU-HSUAN HUNG
LIAM MATTHEWS
IOANA STOCHITOIU
MATTHEW WONGPACK
DAVID HANNA
YEZARNI WYNN
DANIEL MARTINEZ
ASHLEY KIRK
WEI BAI
THUY DO
ZHIYE FEI
MONICA GAD
PEI-WEN WANG
SAMUEL CHORLTON
MARYAN GRAISS
NADINE NEJATI
JENNY PENG
ALEXANDER SAPA
HERMAN BAMI
RACHEL BIERBRIER
RAEES CASSIM
STEPHANIE CHEON
JOONKI HONG
MIKAEL JAGAN
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 4
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
Page 27 of 69
Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
EMILY KEARSLEY
CELIA KWAN
GEOFFREY LAU
HEEDO LEE
SABRINA LUE TAM
ANGELA MA
ADAM MERLO
ANDREW PERRELLA
SARAH SALIBA
DONGHO SHIN
ALVINA SIU
WASIMUDDIN SYED
DOMINIC WANG
YI FAN YANG
ANUJA BHALERAO
NING HAO
MATTHEW NARINE
SHAGUFTA PANCHBHAYA
CONOR SHERIDAN
TARANEH TOFIGHI
ANNE XIA
MATTHEW BRETON
SHAREF DANHO
SAFIYYAH MAHOMED
BILLY SUN
DANIYAL ABDALI
ISABEL KIM
CHIKA ORIUWA
VISHALINI SIVARAJAH
KELSEY VERCAMMEN
THUSYANTH VIJAYAKUMAR
ADAM EQBAL
GABRIEL LAM
HARNEEL KAUR
SAWYER PELOSO
TUL-ZAHRA RIDA
JULIA SHEN
PHILIPP KOLB
OLGA KHUDOYAROVA
SAEHA SHIN
SARAH QUAYYUM
PROGRAM, LV
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 3
B HTH SCI H (BIOMED SCI), LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
MATTHEW JESSOME
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
ANDREW KAMPHUIS
HON B HTH SCI, LV 3
JENNIFER NGUYEN
MIDWIFERY, LV 2
KIRSTEN TAYLOR
MIDWIFERY, LV 2
HANNAH RANDAZZO
MIDWIFERY, LV 2
THE WHIDDEN HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30159) VALUE: $750
SEOYEON KANG
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE LINDY WEE WONG INTERNATIONAL OUTREACH AWARD (30360) VALUE: $1,000
RAMYA KANCHERLA
B HTH SCI H (GLOBAL HTH), LV 2
THE WOODSTOCK HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30160) VALUE: $750
FIZZA MANZOOR
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE YATES SCHOLARSHIPS (30171) VALUE: $800
STEPHANIE CHAN
HON B HTH SCI, LV 1
THE ZOOM MEDIA COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80029) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
MARKO POPOVIC
HON B HTH SCI, LV 2
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = H. SCI: 285
HUMANITIES
THE A.G. ALEXANDER SCHOLARSHIPS (35001) VALUE: $5,500
ANNA REYES
TALIA KOLLEK
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
THE MARGARET E. ORR AND EDWARD C. ALLEN PRIZE (40157) VALUE: $1,000
COURTNEY COCHRANE
H ENGLISH, LV 3
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (60015) VALUE: $400
LESLIE VEALE
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE AMBASSADOR OF SPAIN BOOK PRIZE (50002) VALUE: BOOK
TYESHA SIMMONS
H FRENCH & LING, LV 4
THE ANTHROPOLOGY PRIZE (50004) VALUE: $100
MARIAN GLAVAC
H HISTORY & ANTHRO, LV 4
THE MAQBOOL AZIZ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40158) VALUE: $450
ALEXANDER SALLAS
H ENGLISH, LV 2
THE LAURA BALDWIN SCHOLARSHIP (30313) VALUE: $500
MICHAEL WAY
ANNA KOZAK
H CMST & ENGLISH, LV 3
H ENGLISH, LV 3
THE BANK OF MONTREAL HUMANITIES MULTIMEDIA SCHOLARSHIPS (30259) VALUE: $1,000
GRACIELA ALANIZ
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 2
KYLE PARK
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 4
TANYA GONCALVES
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 3
KATHERINE O'DONNELL
H MMEDIA & ANTHRO, LV 2
CATHERINE CHAMBERS
H ART HIST & MMEDIA, LV 2
CHELSEA PAQUETTE
H MULTIMEDIA, LV 2
SARAH CONRAD
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 2
SARA GARCIA
H FRENCH & MMEDIA, LV 2
GUSTAVO COSTA
H MULTIMEDIA, LV 2
THE WILLIAM AND LIDA BARNS MEMORIAL PRIZE IN HISTORY (50050) VALUE: $150
AMANDA AYER
H HISTORY & RELIG ST, LV 4
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE LOUISE E. BETTGER SCHOLARSHIPS IN MUSIC (30097) VALUE: $450
ANITA IAFRATE
H MUSIC, LV 3
MIKAYLA SALOMONS
H MUSIC(MUSIC COGNITION, LV 2
THE HILDA DOROTHY BORMAN SCHOLARSHIP (30245) VALUE: $1,050
BRENNA EPP
H MUSIC(MUSIC COGNITION, LV 2
THE JOAN FRANCES BOWLING SCHOLARSHIPS (30235) VALUE: $1,500
LAURA CURTIS
H MUSIC, LV 2
MIN-YOUNG KWON
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE TEN BROEKE-BENSEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30195) VALUE: $1,000
AMANDA NASH
H PHILOS, LV 3
THE ELLA HALSTEAD CAMPBELL PRIZE (30048) VALUE: $200
MATTHEW GARTSHORE
NICHOLAS SCOTT
H MUSIC, LV 3
MUSIC 1, LV 1
THE CANADIAN ITALIAN BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL ASSO OF HAMILTON-HALTON SCHOLARSHIP (40152) VALUE: $1,000
DANIEL CARPENTER
H HISTORY, LV 4
THE JAMES ROBERTSON CARRUTHERS MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40025) VALUE: $425
JOANNA PAWLOWSKI
H HISTORY & POL SCI, LV 2
JAIME DENNISON
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
THE WILLIAM G. CARTER SCHOLARSHIP IN GOLF (40121) VALUE: $800
MICHAELA DIMARCANTONIO
H CMST & FRENCH, LV 3
THE NORMAN N. CASKEY MEMORIAL PRIZE (30115) VALUE: $150
ELISSA NASATO
CHRISTOPHER STEPHENS
H MUSIC, LV 3
H MUSIC, LV 2
THE CHIN-CHIN AWARD IN ELECTROACOUSTIC STUDIES/SOUND ART (40172) VALUE: $800
JASON RULE
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 4
THE RYAN B. CLARKE POLITICAL SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30345) VALUE: $1,000
CHANTAL CINO
H PEACE ST & POL SCI, LV 3
THE CLASS OF '38 SCHOLARSHIP IN HONOUR OF AMELIA HALL (30322) VALUE: $1,500
ARTEM KEMOV
H MMEDIA & THTR&FLM, LV 2
GIORELLE DIOKNO
H ENGLISH & THTR&FLM, LV 3
HANNAH WAYNE-PHILLIPS
H THTR & FLM, LV 4
HANAH ITNER
H SOCIOL & THTR&FLM, LV 4
CARISSA KAYE
H ENGLISH & THTR&FLM, LV 3
JENETTE COLE
H HISTORY & THTR&FLM, LV 2
IAN WILUSH
H THTR & FLM, LV 3
DANIEL JOHNSTON
H THTR & FLM, LV 3
THE COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PRIZE* (40008) VALUE: $250
BENJAMIN ROBINSON
GREGORY SPRIENSMA
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
H ENGLISH, LV 3
H ENGLISH, LV 2
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE EDWIN MARWIN DALLEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30164) VALUE: $800
JUSTIN BOZZO
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
MARISSA LABIANCA
H CMST & ENGLISH, LV 4
MEGAN ABBEY
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
JESSICA AUJLA
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
SAIEDA BEGUM
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
GRACE BOCKING
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
ERICA CUDA
HUMANITIES, LV 2
KATHRYN HICKS
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
INGRID LEMIRE
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
AUSTIN STRUTT
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
LUKE TENHAGE
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
KATRINA OWENS
H CMST, LV 3
JOSHUA MAURIN
H ENGLISH & PHILOS, LV 2
JOLEEN SCHMIDT
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
JENNIFER OKOEGUALE
H CMST, LV 3
THE DEAN'S MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE HUMANITIES (50083) VALUE: $5,000 & MEDAL
JAMES RENWICK
H MUSIC, LV 4
THE DEAN'S MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE HUMANITIES (50124) VALUE: $4,000 & MEDAL
CAROLEEN MOLENAAR
H MUSIC, LV 4
KRISTI KWAN
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 4
THE DEAN'S MEDAL FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE HUMANITIES (50125) VALUE: $3,000 & MEDAL
AMANDA AYER
H HISTORY & RELIG ST, LV 4
MIRKO NIKOLIC
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 4
KAYLEIGH STANFIELD-SIMON
H LINGUISTICS, LV 4
THE AUDREY DIEMERT MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE (60005) VALUE: $100
KATHERINE MCKINNON
ENGLISH, LV 2
JULIE HUFF
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 4
THE MARGERY E. DIXON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30301) VALUE: $2,000
GREGORY SPRIENSMA
H ENGLISH, LV 2
KATHLEEN ANDERSON
H ENGLISH, LV 2
THE ROSEMARY DOUGLAS-MERCER MEMORIAL PRIZE (30124) VALUE: $175
LAURA JONES
H CLASSICS & FRENCH, LV 2
THE HORACE A. DULMAGE PRIZE IN PHILOSOPHY (30066) VALUE: $200
SERENA SALVATI
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE JOAN JACKSON DUNBAR TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP (35007) VALUE: $3,675
ASHLEY HARVEY
H ENGLISH, LV 3
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
ANNA REYES
TALIA KOLLEK
KAITLYN BALKOVEC
SAMHITA MISRA
VICTORIA VAROSKY
ALANA HLADY
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
H HISTORY & PEACE ST, LV 2
H ENGLISH, LV 2
H ENGLISH, LV 2
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
SARAH MCCARRON
SARAH CAICCO
LAURA CONDIE
JEMMA LIST
CARLY THACKRAY
ADAM HOTZ
PATRICIA HARVIE
ROBIN VANDERWOUDE
SAVANNAH CLARKSON
TIEGAN MURPHY
JULIA BUSATTO
MICHAEL WALKER
SHAY PAPKE
ELLEN COCCHIARELLA
PROGRAM, LV
H ENGLISH, LV 3
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 3
H CMST, LV 2
H HISTORY & PHILOS, LV 3
H CMST, LV 2
H MUSIC, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H ENGLISH, LV 2
H CMST, LV 2
H CMST, LV 2
H ENGLISH, LV 2
H LINGUISTICS, LV 2
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 2
H CMST, LV 2
THE FARQUHAR/FIRTH ACADEMIC GRANT (85046) VALUE: $1,000
SYDNEY DUSSELIER
H CMST & ENGLISH, LV 2
THE P.J. FERGUSON ACADEMIC GRANT (85075) VALUE: $1,000
JENNA GLOAZZO
H HISTORY, LV 2
THE HAROLD AND GERTRUDE FREEMAN SCHOLARSHIP IN FRENCH (30054) VALUE: $1,000
KATHERINE WALTON
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 3
THE FRENCH SCHOLARSHIP (30405) VALUE: $3,000
CHLOE SUKKAU
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 3
THE MERRILL FRANCIS GAGE SCHOLARSHIPS (30408) VALUE: $500
JASON SCOZZARI
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE SAMUEL GELLER MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE (30261) VALUE: $425
EMILY HERRON
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 3
THE GERMAN CONSULATE TORONTO BOOK AWARD (40167) VALUE: BOOK
JEREMY ANGELINI
H LINGUISTICS, LV 3
THE DAPHNE ETHERINGTON GRAHAM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN ENGLISH (30034) VALUE: $975
PHILIP DRUMM
ENGLISH, LV 3
THE DAPHNE ETHERINGTON GRAHAM MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN HISTORY (30231) VALUE: $1,000
BENJAMIN ARMSTRONG
H HISTORY, LV 2
JOANNA PAWLOWSKI
H HISTORY & POL SCI, LV 2
THE H. B. GREENING BOOK PRIZE (30062) VALUE: $100
TWILA VANDERKOOY
ALEXANDRA POLLARD
H MUSIC, LV 2
H MUSIC, LV 2
THE GUPTA FAMILY INTERNATIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30311) VALUE: $1,500
UDOKA OKAFOR
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
THE AMELIA HALL GOLD MEDAL (50003) VALUE: MEDAL
EMILY GALLOMAZZEI
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
H CMST & THTR&FLM, LV 4
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE ALISE ALEXANIAN HASSEL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30329) VALUE: $800
ABEDAR KAMGARI
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
HEATHER VIDAMOORE
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
SIERRA SMITH
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 4
BROOK DORIN
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
DANIELLA PORANO
H CMST & PEACE ST, LV 3
MATHEW MAINPRIZE
H LINGUISTICS, LV 3
EMMA BRIDGWATER
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
LAURA MCNABB
MUSIC 1, LV 1
ALISON MCNEIL
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
DARYL WATSON
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
ALLYSON GRIFFITH
H FRENCH, LV 3
SCOTT VAN WETTEN
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
MICHAEL WAY
H CMST & ENGLISH, LV 3
ADAM BLACKBURN
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
BIANCA CARAMENTO
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
LAURA JANZEN
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
CHEVALIER TAYLOR
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 3
ELLA GAIR
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
SERENA SALVATI
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
KAITLYN ZARCONE-BEAM
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
EMILY FRANCIS
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
EMESE SYKES
H COGSCI LANG & ENGLISH, LV 3
KATHERINE GOLOBIC
H CMST, LV 3
ROHIDAN RAJKUMAR
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
THE BERTRAM OSMER HOOPER SCHOLARSHIP (30161) VALUE: $250
SYLVIA KACZMAREK
ROHIDAN RAJKUMAR
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
THE NINA LOUISE HOOPER SCHOLARSHIP (30200) VALUE: $500
ELISE NACCARATO
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE HUMANITIES MEDALS FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT (50026) VALUE: MEDAL
KRISTI KWAN
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 4
SAMANTHA SARGENT
H ENGLISH & PHILOS, LV 4
YOSRA MUSA
H ENGLISH, LV 4
LINDSAY HAMILTON
H CMST & THTR&FLM, LV 4
CARRIE MCMULLIN
H CSCT & HISTORY, LV 4
THE MUNICIPAL CHAPTER OF HAMILTON, IODE, MURIEL E. SKELTON AWARD (40036) VALUE: $150
JOHANNA SINCLAIR
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE ITCA COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PRIZE (30387) VALUE: $150
DANIEL IONICO
MICHAELA DIMARCANTONIO
H HISTORY & ANTHRO, LV 3
H CMST & FRENCH, LV 3
THE W. NORMAN JEEVES SCHOLARSHIP (50052) VALUE: $475
ALEXANDRA LINSEMAN
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 4
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE ROBERT H. JOHNSTON UNDERGRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP IN HISTORY (30409) VALUE: $800
DAVID MACFARLANE
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
KONSTANTINOS ZAFIRIDIS
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE JURY PRIZE (30093) VALUE: $1,500
SARAH WHITWELL
TIFFANY KITAGAWA
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
THE MARC KIROUAC MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP* (40131) VALUE: $1,000
JENNA SHAMOON
H ART HIST & ENGLISH, LV 4
THE KIT MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30095) VALUE: $200
EMESE SYKES
H COGSCI LANG & ENGLISH, LV 3
THE KNEALE BROTHERS '37 ACADEMIC GRANT (85011) VALUE: $2,000
ABEDAR KAMGARI
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
NAME NOT RELEASED
H HISTORY & POL SCI, LV 2
THE J. BEVERLY KRUGEL SCHOLARSHIPS IN GERMAN LANGUAGE STUDIES (30364) VALUE: $1,500
ISABELLA GIULIANO
H MUSIC, LV 2
JEREMY ANGELINI
H LINGUISTICS, LV 3
MEGAN SCHABLA
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
JENNA POZZOBON
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
THE LATIN PRIZE* (40031) VALUE: $150
OLIVIA DUDNIK
ANNETTE AMENTA
H ART HIST & CLASSICS, LV 2
H FRENCH & HISTORY, LV 3
THE GARY LAUTENS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40146) VALUE: $4,000
OLIVIAANNE FASULLO
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE E. DORIS LAWRENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30253) VALUE: $2,200
MAUREEN GUSTAFSON
H CMST & FRENCH, LV 2
THE JAMES B. LAWSON SCHOLARSHIP (40090) VALUE: $150
CHAUNCEY KNEGT
H HISTORY & LING, LV 4
THE LINGUISTICS AND LANGUAGES TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP (35014) VALUE: $925
PATRICIA HARVIE
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
THE LINGUISTICS PRIZE (40032) VALUE: $250
LAURA JANZEN
MELANIE RIVA
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
THE ALLAN LUDBROOK MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP* (40114) VALUE: $1,000
DIANE MANOJLOVICH
H MUSIC, LV 4
THE BETTY MACMILLAN PRIZE (30010) VALUE: $150
STEPHEN PETRINA
OLIVIA COSTANTINI
H PHILOS & SOCIOL, LV 3
H FRENCH & SOCIOL, LV 3
THE AGNES AND JOHN MACNEILL MEMORIAL PRIZE (50001) VALUE: $200
JAMES PUNTILLO
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 4
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE MARION D. MAITLAND MEMORIAL ACADEMIC GRANT IN ART HISTORY (85079) VALUE: $1,200
CAMELIA MCLEOD
STUDIO ART 1, LV 1
THE ELEANOR DORNBUSH MARPLES PRIZE IN ART HISTORY* (40015) VALUE: $175
OLIVIA DUDNIK
H ART HIST & CLASSICS, LV 2
THE ELEANOR DORNBUSH MARPLES PRIZE IN THEATRE & FILM STUDIES* (40016) VALUE: $125
ARTEM KEMOV
H MMEDIA & THTR&FLM, LV 2
THE WILLIAM J. MCCALLION SCHOLARSHIPS (60004) VALUE: $250
MARY POKORADI
ELIZABETH DELANEY
ENGLISH, LV 3
H CMST & LINGUISTICS, LV 4
THE H. W. MCCREADY PRIZE IN BRITISH HISTORY* (40022) VALUE: $100
JENETTE COLE
H HISTORY & THTR&FLM, LV 2
THE MCGREGOR-SMITH-BURR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30105) VALUE: $525
SAMUEL STRAGAPEDE
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 3
THE A.G. MCKAY PRIZE IN CLASSICAL STUDIES (50119) VALUE: $200
OLIVIA ROZEMA
EMILY SUMPTER
H ART & CLASSICS, LV 4
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 4
THE ALEXANDER GORDON MCKAY SCHOLARSHIP (30389) VALUE: $500
ANDREA BANKOVA
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 3
KATHERINE ROBINSON
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 3
THE WALTER SCOTT MCLAY SCHOLARSHIP (50057) VALUE: $250
MIRKO NIKOLIC
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 4
THE EVELYN RUTH MCLEAN SCHOLARSHIP IN CANADIAN HISTORY (40164) VALUE: $1,000
EMILY HERRON
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 3
THE PETER MCPHATER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30119) VALUE: $450
CASSANDRA FERGUSON
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
THE MERRIAM SCHOOL OF MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP (30298) VALUE: $1,000
ELISE NACCARATO
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE SZLEK MILLER ACADEMIC GRANT (85071) VALUE: $1,500
NAME NOT RELEASED
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE MULTIMEDIA SENIOR THESIS PRIZE (50110) VALUE: $500
LILY BEAUL
H MMEDIA & PHILOS, LV 4
THE ANNE MURRAY SCHOLARSHIP (30005) VALUE: $300
ALISSA MELITZER
H LINGUISTICS, LV 4
THE ELAINE NARDOCCHIO MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40101) VALUE: $250
CHEVALIER TAYLOR
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 3
SARA GARCIA
H FRENCH & MMEDIA, LV 2
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE NEWCOMBE PRIZE IN PEACE STUDIES (40064) VALUE: $300
DANIELLA PORANO
SAMHITA MISRA
H CMST & PEACE ST, LV 3
H HISTORY & PEACE ST, LV 2
THE ROBERT NIXON SCHOLARSHIP (30203) VALUE: $575
TALIA KOLLEK
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
THE GLADYS BALLANTYNE PARKER PRIZE (30060) VALUE: $25
NATASSIA LEI
H CLASSICS, LV 2
THE IRENE PEARCE SCHOLARSHIP (30395) VALUE: $1,500
KENDRA OUDYK
MATTHEW GARTSHORE
H MUSIC(MUSIC COGNITION, LV 3
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE BARBARA PATRICIA PECKHAM ACADEMIC GRANT (85032) VALUE: $15,000/3 years
ELLA GAIR
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE BRIAN POCKNELL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30390) VALUE: $750
MAUREEN GUSTAFSON
H CMST & FRENCH, LV 2
THE DR. JOHN A. PYLYPIUK SCHOLARSHIP (30039) VALUE: $700
SARAH WHITWELL
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
THE RAND MEMORIAL PRIZE OF CLASS '98 (40045) VALUE: $250
GIORELLE DIOKNO
PHILIP DRUMM
H ENGLISH & THTR&FLM, LV 3
ENGLISH, LV 3
THE HELEN RAY SCHOLARSHIP IN FINE ARTS (40165) VALUE: $2,000
CAMELIA MCLEOD
STUDIO ART 1, LV 1
THE SHARON REEVES SCHOLARSHIP (30135) VALUE: $425
LAURA CURTIS
H MUSIC, LV 2
THE ELLA JULIA REYNOLDS SCHOLARSHIPS (30044) VALUE: $1,000
ANNA KOZAK
KELLY HALCOVITCH
HESTON TOBIAS
JASMINE MULLIN
H ENGLISH, LV 3
H ENGLISH, LV 2
H ENGLISH, LV 3
H ENGLISH, LV 2
THE GLADYS RICHARDS SCHOLARSHIPS (30288) VALUE: $2,000
MARGARET BOYCE
BENJAMIN ROBINSON
JOHN NIELSEN
MAYA BASSO-JIMENEZ
H ENGLISH, LV 4
H ENGLISH, LV 3
H ENGLISH, LV 4
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 2
THE ABRAHAM ISAAC ROSENBERG MEMORIAL PRIZE (50095) VALUE: $225
NUNO DA SILVA
H PHILOS & POL SCI, LV 4
THE MORRIS AND SARAH ROSENHEAD MEMORIAL PRIZE (40033) VALUE: $125
DARYL WATSON
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE RUNDLE FOREIGN STUDY SCHOLARSHIP (35017) VALUE: $2,500
ALANA HLADY
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H ENGLISH, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE E.T. SALMON SCHOLARSHIP (35018) VALUE: $2,000
KATHERINE ROBINSON
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 3
THE E. TOGO SALMON PRIZE IN HISTORY (30392) VALUE: $200
SARA KING
H HISTORY & POL SCI, LV 3
THE NOEL SANDUSKY MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE* (40075) VALUE: $150
MAYA BASSO-JIMENEZ
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 2
ELIZABETH CARMICHAEL
H HISTORY & ANTHRO, LV 2
THE LARRY SAYERS PRIZE IN EAST ASIAN HISTORY* (40030) VALUE: $275
ALEXANDER KASIMOV
H HISTORY, LV 4
ELYSSE MCCUSKER
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 3
THE CARRIE SCHAMEHORN ACADEMIC GRANT (85038) VALUE: $800
GEORGINA MARCOS
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE FEDOR SCHNEIDER SCHOLARSHIP IN ITALIAN (30393) VALUE: $2,000
ASHLEY KARAMY
H FRENCH & LING, LV 2
THE SHEILA SCOTT SCHOLARSHIP IN ENGLISH (30410) VALUE: $800
MICHAEL BEATTIE
SAMUEL STRAGAPEDE
H CMST & ENGLISH, LV 3
H ENGLISH & HISTORY, LV 3
THE LOUIS J. SHEIN SCHOLARSHIP (30189) VALUE: $375
ALMA BOUKHALED
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE PATRICIA L. SMYE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30394) VALUE: $400
JENNIFER COLE
ENGLISH, LV 2
THE LEONA ALLERSTON RYAN AND GORDON HENRY STEVENS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30229) VALUE: $525
GEORGINA MARCOS
H MUSIC, LV 3
THE MARIE L. STOCK SCHOLARSHIP (30104) VALUE: $450
CHLOE SUKKAU
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 3
THE SWISS MINISTER TO CANADA BOOK PRIZES (40051) VALUE: BOOK
CHEVALIER TAYLOR
H COGSCI LANG & FRENCH, LV 3
CHAUNCEY KNEGT
H HISTORY & LING, LV 4
THE JUANITA LEBARRE SYMINGTON SCHOLARSHIP (30370) VALUE: $800
CHELSEA WILSON
H ART HIST & ENGLISH, LV 3
THE T.H.B. SYMONS PRIZE IN CANADIAN STUDIES (40174) VALUE: $500
CHANTAL CINO
H PEACE ST & POL SCI, LV 3
THE THEATRE & FILM STUDIES BOOK PRIZE (40014) VALUE: BOOK
DANIELLE BEATTY
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE GRAHAM RONALD TOOP SCHOLARSHIP (30190) VALUE: $500
LOUISA MATOZZO
H JUSTICE, POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 3
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE JOHN TOTH MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40028) VALUE: $50
GRETA LADANYI
EMILY SUMPTER
KATHERINE JOUN
H CLASSICS, LV 4
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 4
H CLASSICS, LV 4
THE JOHN H. TRUEMAN PRIZE (50067) VALUE: $250
NIKOLAS PANAGIOTOU
ALEXANDRA MCGEE
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 4
H HISTORY, LV 4
THE JOHN H. TRUEMAN SCHOLARSHIP* (40104) VALUE: $250
RYAN DORSMAN
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE MARCUS UDOKANG ACADEMIC GRANT (85068) VALUE: $1,000
SERENA SALVATI
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (40118) VALUE: $800
KATHRYN BROWN
DANIEL CIARABELLINI
DINA HAMED
DONNA BLAKE
H LINGUISTICS, LV 3
H PHILOS, LV 4
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
SYLVIA KACZMAREK
ANDREA BANKOVA
MELANIE RIVA
ANNA REYES
KATHERINE ROBINSON
CASSANDRA FERGUSON
ZAINAB AL-SALIHI
ALEXANDRA WALKER
TALIA KOLLEK
ANGELA ANDERSSON
ERIKA KO
NICOLE MCDERMOTT
KELLY SOVEREIGN
JACOB OHANIAN
SAMANTHA CLARKE
GEORGINA MARCOS
ERIN CARDWELL
LOUISA MATOZZO
MARY PARSONS
JEREMY ZUNIGA RODRIGUEZ
SEAN CALLAGHAN
FINN MERRITT-NEILL
STEPHEN PETRINA
OLIVIA COSTANTINI
JASON LAU
ADRIENNE WOLFE
DOUGLAS KELLAM
BROOKE BINGHAM
AMANDA ARAUJO
KATELYN FALCO
OSCAR ZARANEK
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 3
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H CLASSICS & ANTHRO, LV 3
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
HUMANITIES, LV 2
STUDIO ART 1, LV 1
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
H PHILOS, LV 3
H HISTORY, LV 3
H MUSIC, LV 3
H PHILOS & LABR ST, LV 2
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 3
H CMST, LV 2
H FRENCH & PSYCH, LV 3
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
H PHILOS, LV 3
H PHILOS & SOCIOL, LV 3
H FRENCH & SOCIOL, LV 3
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
H PHILOS, LV 2
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H MULTIMEDIA, LV 2
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
LEANNE LAU
SYDNEY DUSSELIER
ASHLYNN WHALLEY
CHRIS BOSCH
SARA KING
KIRBY TOBIN
ALEXANDER JANACK
TWILA VANDERKOOY
KIMBERLY FARR
JASON SCOZZARI
SEAN MCCARRON
KRISTA SCHWAB
DANIEL IONICO
DANIELLE BEATTY
LINDA DUEMO
LYDIA SANTIA
MAURICIO STRANGE
ALEXANDRA HEIMILLER
ELIZABETH CARMICHAEL
RYAN DORSMAN
JOHN PODEDWORNY
PAUL SOWINSKI
GREGORY JEWELL
TALYSHA BUJOLD-ABU
ANITA IAFRATE
ANDREEA PAUN
NATASSIA LEI
JENNA GLOAZZO
KAITLYN BALKOVEC
NATALIE BOULAY
UNAIZA QURESHI
THE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS (60003) VALUE: $250
LESLIE VEALE
CARMEN STERMANN GALBRAIT
ADRIENNE ANDRUS
SARAH FORBES
PAIGE MAYLOTT
PROGRAM, LV
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
H CMST & ENGLISH, LV 2
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
H PHILOS, LV 4
H HISTORY & POL SCI, LV 3
H STUDIO ART, LV 3
H PHILOS & POL SCI, LV 2
H MUSIC, LV 2
H CMST, LV 4
H MUSIC, LV 3
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 3
H CMST, LV 3
H HISTORY & ANTHRO, LV 3
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
H CMST, LV 3
H HISTORY & ANTHRO, LV 2
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
MUSIC 1, LV 1
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
H STUDIO ART, LV 2
H MUSIC, LV 3
H CLASSICS & FRENCH, LV 2
H CLASSICS, LV 2
H HISTORY, LV 2
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
H COGN SCI OF LANG, LV 2
H CMST, LV 4
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
H LINGUISTICS, LV 2
ENGLISH, LV 2
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
HUMANITIES 1, LV 1
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
ADRIENNE WOLFE
H PHILOS, LV 2
TANYA GONCALVES
H CMST & MMEDIA, LV 3
THE VAREY SCHOLARSHIP (30151) VALUE: $275
TIFFANY KITAGAWA
ANDREEA PAUN
H CLASSICS & HISTORY, LV 2
H CLASSICS & FRENCH, LV 2
THE F. W. WATERS SCHOLARSHIP IN PHILOSOPHY (30197) VALUE: $750
AMANDA NASH
H PHILOS, LV 3
JACOB OHANIAN
H PHILOS, LV 3
THE F. W. WATERS SCHOLARSHIP IN PHILOSOPHY FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS (60008) VALUE: $250
LASZLO POLYAK
H JUSTICE,POL PHILOS&LAW, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE VIOLA E. WEBSTER FOREIGN STUDY AWARD (35026) VALUE: $2,500
SHAUNA POWELL
H CMST, LV 2
THE THOMAS E. WILLEY SCHOLARSHIP (40171) VALUE: $400
CHAUNCEY KNEGT
RAMNEEK SODHI
H HISTORY & LING, LV 4
H HISTORY, LV 4
THE WOMEN'S ART ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIPS (30369) VALUE: $800
MARIA SIMMONS
STUDIO ART 1, LV 1
HAYLEY LUKICH
H ART HIST, LV 2
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = HUMAN: 321
NURSING
THE HENRIETTA ALDERSON SCHOLARSHIP (30379) VALUE: $3,500
EMILY MESTER
ANDREA AIKENS
NURSING, LV 1
NURSING(POST RPN)CONESTG, LV 2
THE LYNNE BEAUMONT SCHOLARSHIP (40127) VALUE: $1,000
SARA TERPSTRA
NURSING, LV 3
THE MARGARET ELIZABETH BURKE MEMORIAL ACADEMIC GRANT (85064) VALUE: $2,700
ALISHA MULLINGS
NURSING, LV 1
THE CLASS OF 1966 NURSING SCHOLARSHIP* (40182) VALUE: $1,000
CAROLYN DAOUST
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 4
THE ELIZABETH PETRA COOKE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40120) VALUE: $1,000
SARAH SCARROW
NURSING(POST RPN)MOHAWK, LV 4
THE CLARA I. ELMAN SCHOLARSHIP (30407) VALUE: $2,500
PAUL BETZ
LARA GOBRAIL
CHANTEL BARRY
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 3
THE DR. SHIGEAKI HINOHARA SCHOLARSHIP (30293) VALUE: $2,400
NADINE MCINTOSH
NURSING, LV 1
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
JILLIAN HALLADAY
NURSING, LV 3
SHUO SHEN
NURSING, LV 2
DANIELLE DUVAL
NURSING, LV 2
EMILY OVCJAK
NURSING, LV 3
THE DONALD LAVIGNE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40123) VALUE: $800
ERIN TURCATO
NURSING(POST RPN)MOHAWK, LV 2
MARISSA GROSS
NURSING(POST RPN)CONESTG, LV 2
THE MCCUSKER NURSING SCHOLARSHIP (40133) VALUE: $2,000
LEANNE DEJONG
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NURSING, LV 2
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE JANET MCKNIGHT AWARD* (40077) VALUE: $600
ERIN FERNHOUT
KATELYND MACMILLAN
PROGRAM, LV
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 3
NURSING, LV 3
THE MCMASTER NURSING ALUMNI MEMORIAL PRIZE* (50092) VALUE: $300
ANNIE LAM
NURSING, LV 4
THARSHIKA SUGUMARAN
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 4
THE MEDICAL-SURGICAL EXCELLENCE IN CLINICAL NURSING AWARD (40086) VALUE: $250
DANIELLE DUVAL
NURSING, LV 2
THE ELEANOR MORRIS ACADEMIC GRANT (85006) VALUE: $800
SAHAR MOMIN
NURSING, LV 1
THE DR. O.W. NIEMEIER SCHOLARSHIP (30114) VALUE: $1,100
ASHLEY TRAKALO
CHRISTINA ANGELONI
NURSING - CONESTOGA, LV 2
NURSING, LV 2
THE PIONEER ENERGY LP PRIZE IN NURSING (50106) VALUE: $250
MARIE-LEE YOUS
JINHEE LEE
NURSING, LV 4
NURSING, LV 4
THE GRACE SENRA-FONTES MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40103) VALUE: $250
VICTORIA DEJONG
CAROLYN NOTARANDREA
NURSING - CONESTOGA, LV 4
NURSING - MOHAWK, LV 4
THE CLARENCE L. STARR PRIZE (30025) VALUE: $150
NADINE MCINTOSH
EMILY MESTER
NURSING, LV 1
NURSING, LV 1
THE CORELENE HELEN TOSTEVIN SCHOLARSHIPS* (40083) VALUE: $250
LAURA SLEZAK
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 3
JUSTINEJEANELLE TING
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 3
KATHLEEN JANSSEN
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 3
JORDAN CAMPBELL
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 3
MELANIE BROWN
NURSING (ACCELERATED), LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
JHERICA IRWIN
ALISHA MULLINGS
LAURA BROWN
VIORICA LEFTER
LEO AKIOYAMEN
KIRANJIT KANG
SEUNGMIN KIM
KENDRA PLETT
SAHAR MOMIN
CAROLINE MUELLER
TAYLOR CLARK
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 1
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 1
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
CAROLINE MUELLER
NURSING, LV 2
STEPHANIE JONES
NURSING, LV 1
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE YATES SCHOLARSHIPS (30171) VALUE: $800
MARINA ABDELMALAK
MELANEY TURNER
KRISTIAN ASHALI
REENU CHHOKAR
SAMANTHA GIBSON
ASLAM KAZIA
ERIN KINNERSLY
TEDDY ROZAD
PROGRAM, LV
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 1
NURSING, LV 1
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 2
NURSING, LV 3
NURSING, LV 3
THE MANUEL AND LILLIAN ZACK SCHOLARSHIP (30101) VALUE: $1,800
KAYLEE HOFSINK
NURSING - MOHAWK, LV 3
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = NURS: 58
SCIENCE
THE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE* (40085) VALUE: $800
MICHAEL GALLAUGHER
VEESTA MAVANDADI
H MATH & STAT (STATS), LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
THE W. K. ALLAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30221) VALUE: $1,100
RANDY BELANGER
H PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 4
THE CAMERON D. ALLEN BOOK PRIZE (40115) VALUE: $200
BRENNA FURLONG
H ENVIRON SCI, LV 4
THE ALUMNI CANADIAN GEOGRAPHY PRIZE (40001) VALUE: $300
GREGORY LARIVIERE
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE HERBERT S. ARMSTRONG MEMORIAL FUND SCHOLARSHIP (30380) VALUE: $100
IWONA WIDURSKA
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
THE CHARLES MURRAY BALL SCHOLARSHIPS IN EARTH SCIENCES (30182) VALUE: $2,300
ALEXANDER FURUKAWA
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 2
REBECCA ENGLERT
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
CRAIG ALLISON
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
NICOLAS RANDAZZO
H ENVIRON SCI, LV 4
THE STANLEY T. BAYLEY SCHOLARSHIP IN BIOLOGY (30330) VALUE: $800
JASMINE DONG
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 3
YAPA SAMARASINGHE
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
THE BEALE-LINCOLN-HALL TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP (35027) VALUE: $2,000
RAQUEL BURGESS
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
THE BEAUTY COUNSELORS OF CANADA SCHOLARSHIP (30008) VALUE: $350
SCOTT LAENGERT
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE BENTALL SCHOLARSHIPS (30281) VALUE: $1,500
PATSY LEE
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H BIOCHEM, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE J.P. BICKELL FOUNDATION MINING SCHOLARSHIPS (40129) VALUE: $2,000
KEATON STRONGMAN
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
REBEKAH INGRAM
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
THE BINKLEY MEDAL (50085) VALUE: $350
WENWAN YANG
H MATH & COMP SCI, LV 4
THE BINNEY FAMILY ACADEMIC GRANT (85053) VALUE: $1,000
IWONA WIDURSKA
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
THE BIOLOGY ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS (40113) VALUE: BOOK
SCOTT LAENGERT
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
ISABEL SHAMSUDEEN
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
ZI WANG
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
SURAJ GOPINATH BIRLA
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
MAI XUE
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
JOELLA HO
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
SAVAR KAUL
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
DARYA LEMIASHKOVA
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
MADELEINE RUDOLPH
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE ABE BLACK MEMORIAL PRIZE (40076) VALUE: $600
TANOR BONIN
H PNB - MUSIC COGNITION, LV 4
THE ABE BLACK MEMORIAL PRIZE* (50000) VALUE: $200
BRANDON TANG
PAULINE LEUNG
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 4
H PNB - MUSIC COGNITION, LV 4
THE LEONE BETTY BLACKWELL MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE (50096) VALUE: $85
DAVID KYNASTON
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 4
THE DR. AND MRS. F.R. BRITTON SCHOLARSHIP IN MATHEMATICS (30051) VALUE: $1,200
ANNIK GOUGEON
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
THE BURKE MEMORIAL RING (50007) VALUE: RING
SARAH DROHAN
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 4
THE CRISPIN CALVO SCHOLARSHIPS (30211) VALUE: $1,700
ERIC LOVINGER
H CHEM, LV 2
THE BETTY TAYLOR CAMPBELL SCHOLARSHIP (30246) VALUE: $4,500
ETHAN SANDERS
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
THE WILLIAM F. CAMPBELL ACADEMIC GRANT (85010) VALUE: $6,000
SURAJ GOPINATH BIRLA
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN (HAMILTON) SCHOLARSHIP (30150) VALUE: $1,500
SIQI HUANG
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
THE CANADIAN ITALIAN BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL ASSO OF HAMILTON-HALTON SCHOLARSHIP (40152) VALUE: $1,000
STEPHANIE SCAGLIONE
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR CHEMISTRY PRIZES (30017) VALUE: MEDAL & CERTIFICATE
CARINE NEMR
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
PETER COOPER
H CHEM, LV 3
THE NANCY CAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN KINESIOLOGY (30382) VALUE: $450
VICTORIA D'SILVA
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE ELVA CARROL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80028) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
NATASHA STRASS-HUNDAL
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE CLASS OF '44 SCHOLARSHIP (30224) VALUE: $1,500
GURJOT GORAYA
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
THE BEATRICE CORRIGAN MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE (40004) VALUE: $125
STEPHANIE SCAGLIONE
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE CSEP/SCPE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT AWARD (50068) VALUE: MEDAL & CERTIFICATE
ZACHARY ADAMS
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE DOUGLAS DAVIDSON SCHOLARSHIP IN GENETICS (40119) VALUE: $400
KRISTINA KLOBUCAR
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 2
THE D. M. DAVIES PRIZE (40099) VALUE: $575
ALEXANDER FURUKAWA
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 2
THE MARGARET C. DIXON ACADEMIC GRANT (85074) VALUE: $1,600
JOTTHI BANSAL
H PNB - MUSIC COGNITION, LV 3
THE DUBECK BIOCHEMISTRY AWARD (30415) VALUE: $3,000
DANIEL NEWSTED
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 4
THE DUBECK CHEMISTRY AWARD (30416) VALUE: $3,000
REBECCA DIPUCCHIO
H ISCI (CHEM BIOL), LV 3
THE JENNIFER J. DUNN TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP IN GEOLOGY (35025) VALUE: $2,500
KATIE MALONEY
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 2
THE EDWARDS HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30156) VALUE: $750
RUI SUN
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE HELEN EMERY SCHOLARSHIPS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (30184) VALUE: $1,650
SHELBY HOFSTETTER
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 3
LAUREN OLDFIELD
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 2
CHELSI MCNEILL-JEWER
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES PRIZE* (40070) VALUE: $100
IAN WAUD
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
MIAN WU
RAQUEL BURGESS
JIAYI CAO
ALISHA ESTEVES
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H CHEM, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
KALI IYER
CAROLINE VAN EVERY
TRYSTAN NAULT
JENNIFER GEMMELL
ANDREW FORBES
NERISSA D'MELLO
BROOKE JONES
CONNOR ALLAN
SYLVIA MILLS
DOUGLAS CHAN
DEVON CRAWFORD
SANDRA COOPER
JEREMIAH HERNANDEZ
KATHLEEN GOULD
LAURA HERRERA
PROGRAM, LV
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
H ISCI (PSYCH,NEURO,BEH), LV 2
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
SCIENCE, LV 2
H ISCI (PSYCH,NEURO,BEH), LV 2
H ISCI (PSYCH,NEURO,BEH), LV 2
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 2
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H PHYSICS, LV 2
THE FEDERATION OF CHINESE CANADIAN PROFESSIONALS (ONTARIO) EDUCATION FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS (30163) VALUE: $1,000
GARTH PRESTON
H PHYSICS, LV 2
THE KLAUS FRITZE MEMORIAL PRIZE (30096) VALUE: $350
YU SHANG
CATHERINE LAMBERT
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
THE J. L. W. GILL PRIZES (30079) VALUE: $325
MILES COUCHMAN
ELIZABETH CULP
SIQI HUANG
DAVID MASSARO
SHELBY STURROCK
MATTHEW GALLI
LORI MINASSIAN
SANJAY SONNEY
REBECCA ENGLERT
ALEXANDRA KASPER
H PHYSICS, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 3
H ISCI (BIOCHEM), LV 3
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 3
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
H ISCI (BIOPHYSICS), LV 3
THE GILMOUR MEMORIAL PRIZE* (40019) VALUE: $125
HANNAH CHIU
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S ACADEMIC MEDAL (50022) VALUE: MEDAL
MICHAEL BIRCH
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 4
SARAH DROHAN
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 4
THE HAMILTON TRANSPORTATION CLUB SCHOLARSHIP (40137) VALUE: $1,000
CARLY HARRISON
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE HAMILTON CHEMICAL ASSOCIATION PRIZE (30385) VALUE: $150
MOUHANAD BABI
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
THE HAMILTON INDUSTRIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30165) VALUE: $800
KHIZAR KARIM
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE BILL AND RIA MAUDE HART SCHOLARSHIP (40154) VALUE: $1,000
JENNA BRAUN
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 2
BRENDA WALTHAM
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 3
THE DAMIAN MIGUEL HEADLEY COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80050) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
SYED DAUD
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
THE HEDDEN HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30198) VALUE: $750
JAMES LAI
H ISCI 1, LV 1
THE RUDY HEINZL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80004) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
ARJUN SITHAMPARAPILLAI
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE HENRY GLOBAL CONSULTING ACADEMIC GRANT (85048) VALUE: $1,000
ZI WANG
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE ROSE HILL SCHOLARSHIPS (30130) VALUE: $1,200
GRACE THOMAS
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
TRISTAN GOODWILL
H ISCI 1, LV 1
AARON KIPP
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
SCOTT LAENGERT
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
DA MING
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
WEI PENG
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
STEPHANIE SCHWINDT
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
ISABEL SHAMSUDEEN
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
ZI WANG
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
MICHAEL GALLAUGHER
H MATH & STAT (STATS), LV 3
NADIA IGDOURA
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
NICHOLAS LUYMES
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
SEAN RIDOUT
H BIOPHYSICS, LV 3
ALAN MORNINGSTAR
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 2
DAVID YUN
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 3
CHRISTOPHER WAVELL
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
MONIQUE ARDIZZI
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH COOP, LV 3
DAVID MASSARO
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH, LV 3
ANDREW LOGIUDICE
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 4
ALYSSA PETRUNIAK
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH COOP, LV 3
AARON GOLDBERG
H ISCI (PHYSICS), LV 2
HAICHAO ZHANG
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 2
SURAJ GOPINATH BIRLA
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
MAHDIYA HAMEER
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
JAMES LAI
H ISCI 1, LV 1
DAANISH MULLA
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
MAI XUE
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
KIEFER EATON
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
CHRISTOPHER GALANO
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
OLIVIA MAZZORATO
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 4
HAILEY MOORE
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
SHELBY STURROCK
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
JOHNATHON BAUER
MED RAD SC - RADIOGR, LV 2
ADRIAN BARDATI
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
DEVORA GOLDBERG
CARINE NEMR
VIVIAN TAM
TARANVIR SANDHU
MARLEY RUSSELL
MICHAEL TRAN
MATTHEW GALLI
KRISTEN MCFADYEN
ALAN ZHOU
JOELLA HO
SAVAR KAUL
BRIONY LAGO
LORI MINASSIAN
OMAR SHAIKH
AMANDA TIBBUTT
TERESA ZIEGLER
ESTHER CHEUNG
SANJAY SONNEY
ERVIN THIAGALINGAM
XIAO DENG
MANVIR DHILLON
MARIA NGUYEN
ROHAN PHILIP
JASPINDER SANDHU
NICHOLAS SAVATTERI
ALEXANDRA LEONARDELLI
NICOLE YOKUBYNAS
SUZANNE BOURSALIE
MICHAEL BORRETT
KAYLA KING
MANKEERAN DHANOA
PARWINDER TAANK
ALEXANDRA BONIN
VEESTA MAVANDADI
EMILY TAM
SANA WARSI
SARAH HADDAD
SAHIBBIR SANDHU
TONG CHEN
LAURA DUNCAN
MADELINE GRITZAN
ALEXANDRA KASPER
RAVI SHERGILL
ALI ABU HELAL
NICOLE CHAU
CHRISTOPHER GUBBELS
PETER GYSBERS
CATHERINE LAMBERT
YI LIU
TREVOR RICE
RUI SUN
NADINE KEXEL
XIAOMENG LI
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H ISCI (BIOCHEM), LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 3
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H ISCI (BIOCHEM), LV 2
H MOLEC BIOL & GEN CO-OP, LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H ISCI (BIOCHEM), LV 2
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH COOP, LV 3
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 2
H ISCI (BIOPHYSICS), LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H ASTROPHYSICS, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
TAYLOR STANOJEV
JUSTIN BOYLE
KAITLYN CHUBB
SEOLA JI
NABIL KHAJA
ANDREW MOCLE
SABITHA RAJARUBAN
AREEBA ATHAR
DANIELLE CORCORAN
SE-JIN KIM
RIA OOMMEN
OLIVER VARETTE
AMIR HAMZEH
CHRISTINA SPINELLI
RACHAEL BARNETT
CHRISTY BOU-FADEL
LORENZO ROSAS
RACHEL SCHWINDT
KESTREL WOODLEY
YUVREET KAUR
HINA ABDULLA
SIMONE SITAR
JOSELYNNE GATIS
PROGRAM, LV
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H MATH & STAT CO-OP, LV 4
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H MATH & STAT (MATH), LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H ISCI (PSYCH,NEURO,BEH), LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED), LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH, LV 3
THE H. L. JACKSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40021) VALUE: $425
MICHAEL GALLAUGHER
JONATHAN BAKER
H MATH & STAT (STATS), LV 3
H MATH & STAT (MATH), LV 3
THE ELIZABETH JENKINS ACADEMIC GRANT (85056) VALUE: $5,000
DA MING
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
THE JENSEN MEDAL (50075) VALUE: MEDAL
STEPHANIE STYPA
H BIOL & PHARM CO-OP, LV 5
THE ART JEROME ACADEMIC GRANT (85067) VALUE: $2,500
CHRISTOPHER WAVELL
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE DR. RONALD V. JOYCE AWARDS FOR ATHLETES (40117) VALUE: $2,500
MADELINE MCDONALD
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
MIRA KRUNIC
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH, LV 3
THE STANFORD N. KATAMBALA EARTH SCIENCES PRIZE (30143) VALUE: $75
SARAH IRVINE
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 4
THE ERNEST ROBERT MACKENZIE KAY SCHOLARSHIPS (30254) VALUE: $800
KRISTINA KLOBUCAR
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 2
YUXIN TIAN
H BIOCHEM, LV 4
MEIHUA HWANG
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
JOSEPH MUSSA
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
MUHAMMAD JIWA
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 3
KATHLEEN HOULAHAN
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 3
GLENN WALPOLE
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
TRACY TO
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 2
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
JIAYI CAO
MICHELLE LY
AAMER SOMANI
JEFFREY LEUNG
REM AZIZ
LEONORA ABDULLAHU
ANDREW PIDUTTI
PROGRAM, LV
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 3
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
THE GEORGE P. AND LEATHA M. KEYS SCHOLARSHIP (30334) VALUE: $750
MELANIE SANTOS
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
DAVID YUN
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 3
THE KINESIOLOGY PRIZE (40041) VALUE: $100
HAILEY MOORE
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE KINESIOLOGY PRIZES (50058) VALUE: $100
CALVIN TSE
DEREK STOUTH
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE J. BEVERLY KRUGEL SCHOLARSHIPS IN GERMAN LANGUAGE STUDIES (30364) VALUE: $1,500
TARIQ DEEN
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE LIVING PROOF ACADEMIC GRANT (85057) VALUE: $1,000
HAILEY MOORE
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE JOHN N.A. LOTT SCHOLARSHIP IN BIOLOGY (30321) VALUE: $500
MICHAEL BARAN
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
LINDSAY HECKMAN
H MOLEC BIOL & GEN CO-OP, LV 3
THE ALEC JOHN ROYSTON MACMILLAN MEMORIAL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80012) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
DEREK STOUTH
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE CATHERINE MACNEILL PRIZE (50011) VALUE: $175
LAURA-EVE MANTELLA
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 4
THE JOHN AND HELEN MAXWELL SCHOLARSHIP (40162) VALUE: $2,500
YU SHANG
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
BRYANNA TIBENSKY
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
BRITTANY NICHOLLS
H CHEM, LV 3
ALLISON ABDILLA
H CHEM, LV 2
LORI VANDEN ENDEN
H ISCI (CHEMISTRY), LV 3
THE WILLIAM J. MCCALLION SCHOLARSHIPS (60004) VALUE: $250
JENNIFER HERMAN
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE ESTHER MCCANDLESS MEMORIAL PRIZE (50016) VALUE: $300
DEAN CARCONE
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 4
THE MCKAY HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30201) VALUE: $750
TERESA ZIEGLER
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE WILLIAM MCKEON MEMORIAL ACADEMIC GRANT IN PHYSICS (85080) VALUE: $2,000
HUANYU MENG
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
TIMOTHY KNIGHT
PHYSICAL SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE A. B. MCLAY SCHOLARSHIP IN PHYSICS (30186) VALUE: $500
ALAN MORNINGSTAR
AARON GOLDBERG
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 2
H ISCI (PHYSICS), LV 2
THE BOYD MCLAY SCHOLARSHIP IN PHYSICS (30011) VALUE: $575
ERVIN THIAGALINGAM
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 3
THE MCMASTER UNIVERSITY FUTURE FUND IN-COURSE AWARD (40151) VALUE: $1,800
CHRISTOPHER GALANO
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
LAURA DUNCAN
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE MCMASTER ATHLETIC COUNCIL COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80033) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
MADELINE MCDONALD
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
THE DONALD G. MCNABB SCHOLARSHIP (30108) VALUE: $925
PETER COOPER
H CHEM, LV 3
THE MIDDLETON/WALKER PRIZE IN SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY (50120) VALUE: $1,000
DAVID KYNASTON
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 4
RODRIGO NARRO PEREZ
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE J. J. MILLER PRIZE (30077) VALUE: $575
ALAN ZHOU
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
THE MOLSON SCHOLARSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (30213) VALUE: $1,100
GRAHAM COLBY
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 3
ALANNA SMOLARZ
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 3
THE MICHAEL J. MORTON MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE (30111) VALUE: $175
PETER COOPER
H CHEM, LV 3
THE MOULTON COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP (30112) VALUE: $1,000
SUSIE SON
CYNTHIA LEE
ANNAMARIA BUKOWIEC
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 2
THE MOULTON HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30239) VALUE: $750
STEPHANIE SCHWINDT
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
THE ANNE MURRAY SCHOLARSHIP (30005) VALUE: $300
TARIQ DEEN
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE P. L. NEWBIGGING PRIZE (50040) VALUE: $100
ISABELLA BRUNO
PNINA BROWN
LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
THE P.L. NEWBIGGING SCHOLARSHIP (40072) VALUE: $375
SERENA HO
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE MANSON OLSON ACADEMIC GRANT (85003) VALUE: $800
PATSY LEE
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
THE FREDRIC P. OLSEN BOOK PRIZE (30053) VALUE: $150
BRITTANY NICHOLLS
MACKENZIE RICHARDSON
H CHEM, LV 3
H ISCI (CHEMISTRY), LV 3
THE PITCHER-RATFORD AWARDS (30397) VALUE: $1,000
ARTHUR MCCONVILLE
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
THE BILL PRESTWICH SCHOLARSHIP IN MEDICAL PHYSICS (30373) VALUE: $800
MEGAN MCFADDEN
MEDICAL RADIATION SCI, LV 1
SAMANTHA SICUTAD
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
SHELBY CHAMPION
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE LES PRINCE RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30325) VALUE: $750
VANESSA BIERLING
TRISTAN GOODWILL
ZI WANG
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
H ISCI 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE PROVOST'S HONOUR ROLL MEDAL (30314) VALUE: MEDAL
VANESSA BIERLING
MICHAEL BIRCH
DEAN CARCONE
MILES COUCHMAN
ELIZABETH CULP
ALEXANDER DHALIWAL
SARAH DROHAN
ALEXANDER FURUKAWA
TRISTAN GOODWILL
PATSY LEE
DA MING
WEI PENG
MELANIE SANTOS
STEPHANIE SCHWINDT
ISABEL SHAMSUDEEN
BRANDON TANG
ZI WANG
JENNIFER BISSON
KIRBY DING
MICHAEL GALLAUGHER
NADIA IGDOURA
NICHOLAS LUYMES
SEAN RIDOUT
SIQI HUANG
DEBORAH KOH
ALAN MORNINGSTAR
DAVID YUN
CHRISTOPHER WAVELL
DAVID MASSARO
DANIEL NEWSTED
KEATON STRONGMAN
NAZIA HOSSAIN
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 4
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 4
H PHYSICS, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H ISCI 1, LV 1
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 4
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 2
H ISCI 1, LV 1
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 4
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
H MATH & STAT (STATS), LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
H BIOPHYSICS, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 4
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 2
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH, LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 4
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 4
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
SHAMS LALANI
JOHN CALDWELL
BUSHRA HABIB
PROGRAM, LV
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 4
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 4
THE PSYCHOLOGY SOCIETY PRIZES (30123) VALUE: $70
CHRISTOPHER GALANO
DEVORA GOLDBERG
MARLEY RUSSELL
NABIL KHAJA
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
THE LLOYD REEDS PRIZE (50033) VALUE: $100
BENJAMIN DIDEMUS
CARLY HARRISON
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 4
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 4
THE RETIRED TEACHERS OF ONTARIO HAMILTON/HALDIMAND DISTRICT PRIZE (40047) VALUE: $200
JASMINE MUNDI
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
THE ALMA AND WIL RICE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (40139) VALUE: $2,000
MATTHEW NICOL
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE HERBERT A. RICKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30391) VALUE: $2,500
MILES COUCHMAN
ELIZABETH CULP
H PHYSICS, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
THE CATHERINE AND ALBERT ROEDER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30332) VALUE: $1,200
ALINA BARNETT
H PHYSICS, LV 2
THE ROSART PROPERTIES INC. SCHOLARSHIP (30129) VALUE: $325
CRAIG ALLISON
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
THE MORRIS AND SARAH ROSENHEAD MEMORIAL PRIZE (40033) VALUE: $125
NICOLE SHEN
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE ROTARY CLUB OF ANCASTER COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80044) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
IWONA WIDURSKA
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
THE ROTARY CLUB OF HAMILTON SCHOLARSHIP (30168) VALUE: $575
KRISTOPHER BRAZIL
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 4
THE ROTARY CLUB OF HAMILTON A.M. COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80042) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
KRISTOPHER BRAZIL
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 4
THE SATURN OF HAMILTON EAST COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80020) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
KAVIYANKA SELVASANDRAN
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 4
THE DR. SINA SAZGAR MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30263) VALUE: $1,000
AKANKSHA NAYAK
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
THE SCHULICH LEADER SCHOLARSHIP (20259) VALUE: $60,000/4 years
ALEXANDER DHALIWAL
H ISCI 1, LV 1
GARTH PRESTON
H PHYSICS, LV 2
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE SCIENCE ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS (30278) VALUE: $500
NICHOLAS LUYMES
HAICHAO ZHANG
ROHAN PHILIP
TONG CHEN
JOSEPH MUSSA
TRACY TO
PROGRAM, LV
H ISCI (BIOLOGY), LV 2
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 2
THE SCIENCE CLASS OF '97 LEGACY COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80030) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
JUDITH NG
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
THE SHEILA SCOTT SCHOLARSHIP FOR BRANDON HALL (30202) VALUE: $750
ALEXANDER DHALIWAL
H ISCI 1, LV 1
THE SHEILA SCOTT SCHOLARSHIP FOR WALLINGFORD HALL (30158) VALUE: $750
MAHDIYA HAMEER
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
THE MARGARET A. SERVICE BOOK PRIZE (40059) VALUE: $120
SAVAR KAUL
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE SHENSTONE PRIZE (30138) VALUE: $200
ISABEL SHAMSUDEEN
MAI XUE
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE GERALD AND VERNA SIMPSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (30343) VALUE: $600
PETER GYSBERS
H ASTROPHYSICS, LV 2
ALINA BARNETT
H PHYSICS, LV 2
THE SOCIETY OF CHEMICAL INDUSTRY MERIT AWARD (50060) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
TIMOTHY CHUNG
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 5
GONCALO SANTOS
H BIOCHEM, LV 4
THE SOMERVILLE SCHOLARSHIPS (30169) VALUE: $800
ANNIK GOUGEON
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
THE MARNIE SPEARS SCHOLARSHIP (40170) VALUE: $1,200
ALEXANDRA KASPER
H ISCI (BIOPHYSICS), LV 3
THE SPORT COACHING PRIZE (40112) VALUE: $500
MIKAILA NEDERVEEN
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE S. L. SQUIRE SCHOLARSHIPS (30132) VALUE: $850
AIJIA YANG
MEGAN HARTWELL
GUILLIAN BALISI
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
THE STOBO SCHOLARSHIP (30170) VALUE: $325
DA MING
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
THE SWISS MINISTER TO CANADA BOOK PRIZES (40051) VALUE: MEDAL
DANIELA CORSANO
H BIOLOGY, LV 4
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE KENNETH W. TAYLOR BOOK PRIZE* (40029) VALUE: $100
KIRBY DING
PROGRAM, LV
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE MARK AND BEV TAYLOR FAMILY ACADEMIC GRANT (85051) VALUE: $1,000
HAICHAO ZHANG
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 2
THE HUGH R. THOMPSON MEMORIAL PRIZE (30069) VALUE: $250
KEATON STRONGMAN
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
THE DR. R. A. THOMPSON PRIZE IN MATHEMATICS (30040) VALUE: $300
KAITLYN CHUBB
H MATH & STAT CO-OP, LV 4
SE-JIN KIM
H MATH & STAT (MATH), LV 3
THE STEPHEN F. H. THRELKELD COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80026) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
LAURA-EVE MANTELLA
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 4
THE LINDA (PAOLIN) TONINI '71 ACADEMIC GRANT (85065) VALUE: $1,000
AMANDA TIBBUTT
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
THE UBS GLOBAL ASSETS MANAGEMENT (CANADA) COMPANY COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARDS (80036) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
RACHEL TAN
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
ALEXANDER DHALIWAL
THOMAS MCGILL
MANREET DHALIWAL
HENRY FAN
NICOLE HAMEL
DONGHOON HAN
SAMI HARB
MARYAM JATOI
MOIZ MIKAIL
JUSTIN PARKER
MICHAEL RIZZUTO
IETA SHAMS
SHREY VAZIR
JAIME MEUNIER
XUAN YAO
MARAH ALSAYED HASAN
SARA SINCLAIR
KEVIN GUO
HEATHER KLYN-HESSELINK
CLEMENT LAU
DEEMA COUCHMAN
SIMRAT KAHLON
IVAN NAYVE
ARIC HUANG
BRIAN MCPHERRIN
MICHAEL CIANCONE
SANAMPREET GURM
KIM-ANH NGUYEN
EMILY PAOLUCCI
IWONA WIDURSKA
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
H ISCI 1, LV 1
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
MEDICAL RADIATION SCI, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
MED RAD SC - RADIOGR, LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
MED RAD SC - ULTRA, LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOL & PHARM CO-OP, LV 4
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H BIOL & PHARM CO-OP, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED), LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ADAM BUCHWALD
JEFFREY MINUK
CHRISTINE HUYNH
KRISTYN ST.HILAIRE
FRANK ONG
SHARON JEBASELVAN
AHMED LABIB
FAIZA ALI
NICHOLAS SINGH-PICKERSGILL
CASEY SHUM
FAISAL ADAM PANY
LAUREN POULIN
VICTORIA WALASZCZYK
LEILA JAFARI
ALEXANDRA CHEN
LIBAN MOHAMED
BRADLEY ANDRADE
COLLIN BROWN
VICTORIA DISABATINO
DARYA LEMIASHKOVA
WEN LIN
JACQUELINE MILLS
TINA NHAM
HEATHER OPREY
MATTHEW RALEIGH
MADELEINE RAWLING
ANNE STOTESBURY
IRTAZA TAHIR
JIARUN WEI
AMANDA YEE
CHRISTAL ZHOU
KRISTEEN ESHAK
ZHUO XU
LAURA CHAN
ANDREW SCOTT
JIN YANG
ALON GENKIN
SAIF SHAMSHOON
PRIYA GARG
LISA LORENTZ
PARMINDER SINGH
SHERRY YANG
KIERA MCDUFF
CHLOE NG
ANDY TRAN
JIMMY SONG
JANICE WONG
NICOLE SHEN
SHAYENTHIRAN SREETHARAN
HANNAH CHIU
ANDY CHEN
GAVIN MAST
KARA TSANG
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED), LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 4
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H CHEM, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
MED RAD SC - RADIOGR, LV 3
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
H GEOG & ENVIRO SCI, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ONELLA PEREIRA
CAROLYN ROCCA
MELISSA SHEARS
STEPHANIE BELDICK
SARAH COLETTI
SARAH SHAIKH
MARTIN BLOSTEIN
KATIE HUYNH
USAMA TAHIR
ALLAN TUNG
EMILY BELLICOSO
LETITIA BRUBACHER-CRESSMA
MARK CAMPBELL
LINDSEY CARFRAE
EDMOND CHIU
JACQUELINE CHOW
YAO LIN
MARIA TAUQIR
JORDAN THIESSEN
REBECCA VOTH
ANDREW WAN
KOSALAN AKILAN
BRETT HNATIW
MEGAN LAW
ABIGAIL LEE
JASMINE MUNDI
TANNER STOKES
SARAH WILKIN
PAUL BAN
GI-YUEN CHENG
REJY GABALDON
EMILY KAPTEYN
BRANDON BROIJER
SHANJEEVAN SHANMUGABHAVANANT
KELLY HO
NICOLE HUGHES
MUHAMMAD IZHAR
CATHY NGUYEN
JULIAN LEE
MICHAEL MORRA
RADWA ELSHARAWI
KATHERINE LOBARBIO
CAMERON OVERBEEKE
GAGAN-DEEP SAMBHI
KIRBY YEE
KRISTOPHER BRAZIL
ROHIT JOGENDRAN
TANJA SACK
JARED VALDRON
KRISTINA KIM
CALVIN RUSSELL
ARIANE METCALF
JIN XIONG
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H ISCI 1, LV 1
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOLOGY & MATH, LV 2
H ACTUAR & FIN MATH, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
MED RAD SC - ULTRA, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H CHEM CO-OP, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 3
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 4
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 3
H ISCI (PSYCH,NEURO,BEH), LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 4
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ABBY HURD
MICHELE WEBB
GARRETT SCHUILENBERG
AKSHAY VENKATESH
RICHARD LY
CHRISTOPHER CHIANG
JESSICA BAGLOLE
FARIHA MAHMOOD
JONATHAN BAKER
PEI LI
AMANDA BAXTER
LIANNA BRAHAM
YUAN CAI
EBENEZER DANIEL
SEJAL DOSHI
ERIK ETZLER
MARTINA GHOBRIAL
NATALIE KOEHLER
MARISSA LU
CARALINE MCDIARMID
NATALIA OGRODNIK
MADELEINE RUDOLPH
MARK ZASOWSKI
KAITLYN HOWDEN
SIMONNE KHAIR
TRAVIS SUTHERLAND
MIAN WU
CORAL FAIRHEAD
VISHAL PATEL
STACEY PRIEST
MANINDERJEET SINGH
AHMED AL-SHAFAYEEN
MARY MACDONALD
ANNE ODUMAH
DONOVAN RAMKISHUN
HARJOT SIDHU
NICHOLAS ALLEN
JESSE BETTENCOURT
SHANNON KAINULA
CHRIS KAMINSKI
JESSICA LOO-YONG-KEE
NORMAN SHEK
JI-HO CHAN
HOI CHEUNG
VICTORIA MARKO
AHMED NEGMI
CECELIA MC LACHLAN
NICHOLAS SAVICKAS
YONG LI
MARK WONG
SUKHVIR AUJLA
EMIL KARPINSKI
DANIELLE VITALI
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEM, LV 2
H MATH & STAT (MATH), LV 3
MED RAD SC - ULTRA, LV 2
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H MOLEC BIOL & GEN CO-OP, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 2
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 4
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H MOLEC BIOL & GEN CO-OP, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
MEH NOOR
CHRISTIAN PRETTO
JIAQIAO TANG
HANAE DAVIS
SOHEIL EL-AZZOUNI
PAVITHRA PARTHASARATHY
SARAH STEWART
TAYLOR BRONZOVICH
BALDEEP LITT
KRISTINA MLAKAR
RAMMDEEP SAINI
JIA XU
KA LAU
SAMANTHA WONG
ERIKA GIOVANNETTI
MICHAEL CALWAY
CHRISTIAN DI BIAGIO
CORINNE DUPERROUZEL
NORHAN ELSAADAWY
BIRAN FALK-DOTAN
SERENA HO
MOHAMMAD KHAN
LINA KO
DANIEL LEVIN
JAY MITCHELL
CASSANDRA SIMMONS
NIRON SUKUMAR
XIN YE WANG
RUILIN WU
JESSE XIAO
ELLEN CONNELLY
ADOMAS KULESZA
MALVIN MAK
DANIEL SON
AMY URQUHART
YACHUN CAO
FANGYI LIU
MANU SHARMA
BANDEEP KAUR
ROHAN MINHAS
CHLOE LAU
TRANG LE
LORENZO LAMURA
AMANDA MORIN
FRANKI MILLER
MOHAMED KAZEM
AMIE KRON
KENDRA YOUNG
PRATEEK JHINGAN
EVELYN LAI
ERIN TATTERSALL
DARSH SHETH
ANDREI DOBRIN
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 3
H BIOL & PHARM CO-OP, LV 4
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
MED RAD SC - RAD TH, LV 3
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H ISCI 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
MEDICAL RADIATION SCI, LV 1
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOCHEM, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H ISCI (BIOCHEM), LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
MED RAD SC - RADIOGR, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H MATH & STAT, LV 4
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
FRASER EVANS
MATTHEW RHYNOLD
JOTTHI BANSAL
AMANDA FODERARO
SOFIA MEHTA
ANUM RAHMAN
KATRINA PULLIA
CLAUDIA HOPKINS
AUNIMA BHUIYA
WENDY CHI
RAQUEL BURGESS
SOPHIA DUONG
MICHAEL GILL
TAI TRUONG
COURTENAY WOOD
LAVAN SIVARAJAH
KAREN CHIU
MACKENZIE CHOWN
DANA SWARBRICK
CHAUDHRY ASLAM
LORETTA HSU
ANAND PATEL
BRENDEN DU
KRISTINE GARGARITANO
ERIC HEINTZMAN
NAFIS HOSSAIN
ZAFRIN ISLAM
HAN KANG
MICHAEL KU
XUE PIAO LENG
AMANDA LI
RAMNEET MANN
MARI MUELLER
SOUMIL NARAYAN
RICHARD NGUYEN
KIRILL PANKOV
ZAIN PATEL
JACOB PIERSCIANOWSKI
ANDREW SCARSELLONE
KYRA SIMONE
STANLEY WONG
TIFFANY WONG
VINAYAK BHANDARI
NICOLE DRAKE
HURMIZ SHAMANA
SRUTHI THOMAS
MICHAEL WADIE
ADAM KOWALCZYK
WILLIAM TSANG
CATHY CAO
DHAIRYA KIRI
ROBYN MURPHY
THARSIKA NADESAPILLAI
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
PROGRAM, LV
H PHYSICS CO-OP, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H PNB - MUSIC COGNITION, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & PSYCH, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM COOP(BIOMED RS, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 2
H ISCI (MATH&STAT), LV 2
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H PNB - MUSIC COGNITION, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
MED RAD SC - RAD TH, LV 3
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H BIOCHEM, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 3
MED RAD SC - RADIOGR, LV 2
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
HONOURS KINESIOLOGY 1, LV 1
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H ISCI 1, LV 1
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H PHYSICS, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
H BIOLOGY (PHYSIOLOGY), LV 2
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
MED RAD SC - RAD TH, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & MATH, LV 3
JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
SHYAMAL PANSURIYA
MAHA IQBAL
DANIEL JUNG
DAVEENA SIHOTA
LAUREN MAZARA
ALEXANDRA DUROCHER
NICOLE LINDSAYMOSHER
STEVEN MA
SOLEN ABDULLA
ELIZABETH BARR
ARTHUR CATAPANO
TIFFANY DZUGAN
DEIDRA MCDERMID
JESSICA VU
ERIN RAMOUTAR
MICHAEL BARAN
PING-YAO HSIEH
HAMMAD AQEEL
AALIYA WAJA
MARYAM DAVARI
BRENDAN DUKE
THE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS (60003) VALUE: $250
KA YEE KWAN
JOYCE LI
PETER FENLON
PROGRAM, LV
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
MED RAD SC - ULTRA, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 4
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H ISCI (BIOCHEM), LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED), LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY & ENVIRON SCI, LV 2
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H BIOLOGY, LV 3
H CHEM BIOL CO-OP, LV 4
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H PHYSICS, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 4
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
HANNAH DIES
H ISCI (PHYSICS), LV 4
JOSEPH LONGO
H MOLEC BIOL & GENETICS, LV 4
THE SUSAN VAJOCZKI LEGACY TRAVEL SCHOLARSHIP (35028) VALUE: $1,000
NICOLE RAKOWSKI
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
THE VALE CANADA LTD. SCHOLARSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (30275) VALUE: $2,000
MONICA WIERCIGROCH
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 2
KRISTIN CLEMENTS
H EARTH & ENV SCI, LV 3
THE VALLEY CITY MANUFACTURING CO. LTD. SCHOLARSHIPS (30411) VALUE: $1,600
VANESSA BIERLING
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
MOUHANAD BABI
H CHEMICAL BIOLOGY, LV 2
THE JIM WADDINGTON PRIZE IN PHYSICS & ASTRONOMY (30398) VALUE: $1,000
HUANYU MENG
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
TIMOTHY KNIGHT
PHYSICAL SCIENCES 1, LV 1
THE WALKER / MIDDLETON FIELDWORK SCHOLARSHIP (40176) VALUE: $1,000
KIRA MOOR
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 3
KATIE MALONEY
H ISCI (EARTH&ENVIRO SCI, LV 2
THE WHIDDEN HALL RESIDENCE SCHOLARSHIP (30159) VALUE: $750
WEI PENG
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
MATH & STATS 1, LV 1
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE EMANUEL WILLIAMS SCHOLARSHIP IN PHYSICS (30049) VALUE: $1,200
NICOLE DUMONT
H MATH & PHYSICS, LV 2
THE IVOR WYNNE MEMORIAL PRIZE (30075) VALUE: $250
AARON KIPP
DAANISH MULLA
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
H KINESIOLOGY, LV 3
THE YATES SCHOLARSHIPS (30171) VALUE: $800
GURPREET CHANDI
KEEYEON HWANG
RAJEEV JETLY
PAUL ROOPRAI
ZHE YANG
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 2
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
LIFE SCIENCES 1, LV 1
H LIFE SCIENCES, LV 3
THE MARGUERITE Z. YATES SCHOLARSHIP (30167) VALUE: $225
SEAN RIDOUT
H BIOPHYSICS, LV 3
THE GLADYS A. YOUNG SCHOLARSHIP (30206) VALUE: $1,600
MELANIE SANTOS
H MATH & STAT, LV 2
THE ZOOM MEDIA COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80029) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
YUXIN TIAN
H BIOCHEM, LV 4
GLENN WALPOLE
H BIOCHEM (BIOMED RSRCH), LV 3
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = SCI: 716
SOCIAL SCIENCES
THE ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS OF EXCELLENCE* (40085) VALUE: $800
JESSICA EVANS
LAUREN KARRYS
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
THE ATKINSON CHARITABLE FOUNDATION COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80022) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
NASHWA KHAN
H HEALTHST, LV 4
THE MARION BATES BOOK PRIZE (50034) VALUE: $85
ALEXANDRA BISSLEY
H HEALTHST & HISTORY, LV 4
THE BARBARA AND RONALD BAYNE AWARD* (40106) VALUE: $450
KONRAD LISNYJ
JESSICA WAINMAN
H HEALTHST, LV 3
H HEALTHST, LV 4
THE ABE BLACK MEMORIAL PRIZE* (50000) VALUE: $200
PAZ FORTIER
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 4
THE MIKE BRAGA SCHOLARSHIP (40175) VALUE: $1,000
RYAN SPARROW
H LABR ST, LV 4
THE CITIZEN ACTION GROUP AWARD IN MEMORY OF HARRY PENNY* (40166) VALUE: $1,000
JAMIE WESTON
SOCIAL WORK, LV 3
THE HUGH CLARK SCHOLARSHIP (30068) VALUE: $1,950
PETER DEMAIO
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 3
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE CLASS OF '50 SCHOLARSHIP IN HONOURS ECONOMICS (30027) VALUE: $700
XIAOYU GUO
H ECON & SOCIOL, LV 2
XIN RUAN
H ECON, LV 2
THE EDWIN MARWIN DALLEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPS (30164) VALUE: $800
NEHA BEHAL
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 2
LOIS ALLEN
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 3
NATALIE AUSTIN
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
AMY FRANKRUYTER
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
LUCAS KEESMAAT
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SHAWNEE MATINNIA
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
TYLER RUBINI
SOCIAL SCIENCES, LV 2
DEREK ELLENS
H RELIG ST, LV 2
TASMINE VANDENBERG
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 2
DEBORAH RIMAY
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 4
AGATHA MACIASZEK
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 2
KAYLA LAVALLEE
SOCIAL SCIENCES, LV 2
MEAGHAN JEFFRIES
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 3
COURTNEY LOCKHART
H LABR ST, LV 3
APOSTOLE THERSIDIS
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 4
HAOYAN LIAO
H ECON, LV 2
THE TONY DEAN SCHOLARSHIP IN LABOUR STUDIES (40136) VALUE: $1,000
MELISSA CAMERON
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 2
THE EXCHANGE GRANT (86001) VALUE: $1,000
JENNIFER HOWARTH
MIRUNA BIRSAN
ERICA VITATERNA
LYNN KELLY
TAYLOR LUNDY
KATERINA KALENTERIDIS
KAYLY ROBBINS
ALYSSA JANSSEN
KAITLIN MASON
JESSICA MACPHERSON
DELAINE DECRAEMER
JENNA MCHUGH
NADIA RAEBURN-CHERRADI
BRITTANY BATES
SAMANTHA WHITE
CAROLYNN CHENNERY
MADELEINE ANSTIS
MONICA REAGAN
PETER DO
JASMINE TONG
ANGELA CASOL
ERIN KENNALEY
ISABEL CHALMERS
H ANTHRO, LV 2
POL SCI & S/W, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 2
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
H LABR ST & ANTHRO, LV 2
H GEOG, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H HEALTHST, LV 2
SOCIAL SCIENCES, LV 2
H HEALTHST, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H ANTHRO & RELIG ST, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 2
H POL SCI, LV 3
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H POL SCI, LV 2
H GERONTOLOGY, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 4
THE SUSAN FARLEY SCHOLARSHIP (40130) VALUE: $500
AUDREY TAN
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE R. LOUIS GENTILCORE PRIZE (40062) VALUE: $550
GEOFF ROSE
MICHAEL AYALEW
H GEOG, LV 2
H GEOG, LV 4
THE J. E. L. GRAHAM MEDAL (50029) VALUE: MEDAL
DARLENE MILKO
SOCIAL WORK, LV 3
THE BRUCE M. HAMILTON AWARD (50123) VALUE: $1,000
JASON BATTICK
H SOCIOL, LV 4
THE JENNIFER HEADLEY SCHOLARSHIP (50114) VALUE: $1,000
MALCOLM JOHNSON
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 4
THE DR. HARRY LYMAN HOOKER SCHOLARSHIPS (30043) VALUE: $1,500
XIAOYU GUO
H ECON & SOCIOL, LV 2
ESTEFAN MEJIA
H SOCIOL, LV 4
ANTHONY IAFRATE
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
GEOFF ROSE
H GEOG, LV 2
CATHERINE RENWICK
H ECON & MATH, LV 2
ABRAHAM THOMAS
SOCIAL SCIENCES, LV 2
SAMANTHA ATKINS
H ANTHRO, LV 2
KIMBERLY DOWELL
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 3
MONICA MORCOS
H ECON, LV 2
SHANAE TURNBULL
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 3
ADAM HOWE
H POL SCI & SOCIOL, LV 4
SHANNON DESPOND
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 3
SARAH BRUNT
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 2
ASHLYN FLOYD
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
GABRIELLA LECHNER
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
LAURA STOTHART
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
XIN RUAN
H ECON, LV 2
PHILIP BADAWY
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 3
SCARLETT MACKAY
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 4
LINDSAY ROBINSON
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 3
ROBERT SMITH
H POL SCI, LV 4
AUDREY TAN
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
AMANDA VENIER
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 2
JAMES ANKERS
SOCIAL SCIENCES, LV 2
ASHLEIGH PATTERSON
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 2
CHRISTINA BOROWIEC
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 3
STEPHANIE GURRIERI
H CMST & PSYCH, LV 3
YENA WEI
H ECON, LV 3
THE HUMAN RIGHTS AWARD (40087) VALUE: $275
ADAM HOWE
H POL SCI & SOCIOL, LV 4
THE HURD MEDAL (50027) VALUE: MEDAL
MACKENZIE ROGERS
H ECON, LV 4
THE EDWARD JENKINS AWARD (40161) VALUE: $5,000
MICHELLE MARCIL
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
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Awards Report
Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE JAMES A. JOHNSON COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80023) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
SONIA STELLATO
H SOCIOL, LV 3
THE LAWRENCE AND KATHLEEN JOHNSTON MEMORIAL PRIZE (30388) VALUE: $250
NATHAN BERESH
H RELIG ST, LV 2
MEAGAN WALKER
RELIG ST & S/W, LV 2
THE FRANK E. JONES PRIZE (50020) VALUE: $100
KATARZYNA GAL
H SOCIOL, LV 4
THE DR. JEAN JONES MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP* (50099) VALUE: $800
TANIA MEDEIROS
SOCIAL WORK, LV 3
MARGARET JAMIESON
SOCIAL WORK, LV 3
THE KARL KINANEN ALUMNI PRIZE IN GERONTOLOGY (50064) VALUE: $50
KRISTINA KOKORELIAS
H GERONTOLOGY, LV 4
DANAIT MEHRETEAB
H HEALTHST & PEACE ST, LV 4
THE KNEALE BROTHERS '37 ACADEMIC GRANT (85011) VALUE: $2,000
XIAOYU GUO
H ECON & SOCIOL, LV 2
SAMANTHA ATKINS
H ANTHRO, LV 2
THE RUTH LANDES PRIZE (50048) VALUE: $100
JULILLA PAUL
H ANTHRO, LV 4
THE PAUL LEE-CHIN SCHOLARSHIP (30401) VALUE: $1,000
AMRAN WALI
H ECON, LV 2
THE FELIKS LITKOWSKI PRIZE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE (50116) VALUE: $800
ERIC ANDREWS
H POL SCI, LV 4
THE MACGIBBON SCHOLARSHIP* (40159) VALUE: $500
MATTHEW BIZLEY
AMANDA BOND
H ECON, LV 4
H ECON, LV 3
THE BETTY MACMILLAN PRIZE (30010) VALUE: $150
EMILY SULLY
H GERONT & SOCIOL, LV 3
THE WILLIAM J. MCCALLION SCHOLARSHIPS (60004) VALUE: $250
DONNA DOLBEAR
WENDY SAMMUT
SANDRA MAKINO
H ANTHRO, LV 2
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOCIOL, LV 3
THE R. C. MCIVOR MEDAL (50043) VALUE: MEDAL
MACKENZIE ROGERS
H ECON, LV 4
THE MCMASTER UNIVERSITY RETIREES ASSOCIATION PRIZE (60014) VALUE: $350
JILLIAN GOLTZ
H GERONTOLOGY, LV 3
THE MCMASTER UNIVERSITY RETIREES ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP (30377) VALUE: $1,250
VICTORIA ADSHADE
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
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JOWETT.IC_UCAC(3F)
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE MCMASTER AMICUS ACADEMIC GRANT IN SOCIOLOGY (85070) VALUE: $1,000
ESTEFAN MEJIA
H SOCIOL, LV 4
THE AUDREY EVELYN MEPHAM AWARD* (50090) VALUE: $1,200
KRISTINA KOKORELIAS
DANAIT MEHRETEAB
LATOYA GRANT
H GERONTOLOGY, LV 4
H HEALTHST & PEACE ST, LV 4
H HEALTHST, LV 4
THE MOFFAT FAMILY PRIZE (40138) VALUE: $300
KIRSTEN EATON
IRENE MINAJI
H GEOG, LV 4
GEOG & S/W, LV 3
THE E. S. MOORE PRIZE (50015) VALUE: $225
MICHAEL AYALEW
H GEOG, LV 4
THE DOREEN MORRISON ACADEMIC GRANT (85081) VALUE: $1,200
PETER DEMAIO
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 3
THE P. L. NEWBIGGING PRIZE (50040) VALUE: $100
JESSICA JAMIESON
BREANNE LEMAITRE
PSYCH, LV 3
PSYCH, LV 3
THE DERRY NOVAK PRIZE (40169) VALUE: $800
ALEXANDER SMITH
CHRISTOPHER TELFORD
H POL SCI, LV 3
H POL SCI, LV 3
THE ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF SOCIAL WORKERS PRIZES* (50122) VALUE: $250
ANDREA LEWIS
SOCIAL WORK, LV 3
CHRISTINA BENDER
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 4
THE HARRY L. PENNY PRIZE (50023) VALUE: $100
BARRY SPINNER
GEOG & S/W, LV 4
THE PEVENSING SCHOLARSHIP (30396) VALUE: $1,000
MICHAEL POON
INGIE METWALLY
H ECON, LV 3
H CMST & ECON, LV 3
THE PIONEER ENERGY LP GERONTOLOGY PRIZE (50021) VALUE: $45
LATOYA GRANT
H HEALTHST, LV 4
THE PIONEER ENERGY LP PRIZE (40058) VALUE: $400
LAUREN KARRYS
TAYLOR HEFFERING
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
H GERONT & SOCIOL, LV 3
THE PIONEER ENERGY LP SCHOLARSHIP (30121) VALUE: $1,000
EMILY SULLY
EMILY CICHONSKI
AMY VANDERLINDE
LAUREN KARRYS
H GERONT & SOCIOL, LV 3
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 3
HLTH,A&S & S/W, LV 3
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
THE PITCHER-RATFORD AWARDS (30397) VALUE: $1,000
LARISSA DI BARTOLO
LINDSEY WELLSTEAD
H GEOG, LV 3
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 3
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE POLITICAL SCIENCE PRIZE (50042) VALUE: $200
MIKE WOLFSGRUBER
PROGRAM, LV
H POL SCI, LV 3
THE POLITICAL SCIENCE HONOURS ESSAY PRIZE (50059) VALUE: $100
NATALIE FARKAS
H POL SCI, LV 4
THE PROVOST'S HONOUR ROLL MEDAL (30314) VALUE: MEDAL
XIAOYU GUO
H ECON & SOCIOL, LV 2
THE PSYCHOLOGY SOCIETY PRIZES (30123) VALUE: $70
AMINA KHAN
DEANNA MORRA
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
THE LLOYD REEDS PRIZE (50033) VALUE: $100
KIRSTEN EATON
DIANA ENRIQUEZ
H GEOG, LV 4
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 3
THE RELIGIOUS STUDIES PRIZE (50045) VALUE: $100
AMANDA MASTALERZ
H RELIG ST, LV 4
THE JACK RICHARDSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (60013) VALUE: $400
CHRISTOPHER STEWART
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 4
LIONEL SANDERS
H SOCIOL, LV 4
THE ROSART PROPERTIES INC. SCHOLARSHIP (30129) VALUE: $325
ASHLEIGH PATTERSON
H GEOG & ENVIRO ST, LV 2
THE ELLEN BOUCHARD RYAN SCHOLARSHIP* (40092) VALUE: $400
AMY VANDERLINDE
TAYLOR HEFFERING
HLTH,A&S & S/W, LV 3
H GERONT & SOCIOL, LV 3
THE SATURN OF HAMILTON EAST COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARD (80020) VALUE: CERTIFICATE
AUDREY TAN
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
THE LARRY SEFTON SCHOLARSHIPS* (40097) VALUE: $500
KELSEY ALLEN
RYAN SPARROW
VANESSA MURACA
H LABR ST, LV 4
H LABR ST, LV 4
H LABR ST, LV 2
THE RICHARD SLOBODIN PRIZE (50046) VALUE: $100
MARISSA LEDGER
H ANTHRO, LV 4
THE SOCIAL WORK PRIZE (40050) VALUE: $100
DIANE LIU
PSYCH & S/W, LV 2
THE SOCIOLOGY PRIZE (50051) VALUE: $100
RACHEL ALFANO
SARAH BAKER
SOCIOL, LV 3
SOCIOL, LV 3
THE ANNE STEIN MEMORIAL PRIZE (40003) VALUE: $125
ROMITA SUR
REBECCA SHELUK
POL SCI & S/W, LV 3
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 3
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
THE ANNE STEIN MEMORIAL PRIZE* (60001) VALUE: $125
RACHEL DERRY
PROGRAM, LV
SOCIAL WORK, LV 2
THE T.H.B. SYMONS PRIZE IN CANADIAN STUDIES (40174) VALUE: $500
MICHAEL GORDON
H POL SCI, LV 4
THE THOMPSON ACADEMIC GRANT (85015) VALUE: $800
XIN RUAN
H ECON, LV 2
THE THOMAS TRUMAN MEMORIAL PRIZE (40068) VALUE: $75
TRAVIS MCCALLUM
GABRIEL GADALA MARIA
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 3
H POL SCI, LV 3
THE UNIVERSITY ACHIEVEMENT AWARD (40118) VALUE: $800
ROBERT REVINGTON
KATHLEEN FITZPATRICK
MEGAN MEREDITH
DIANNA WILLIAMS
H RELIG ST, LV 4
H ANTHRO, LV 3
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
H ANTHRO, LV 2
THE UNIVERSITY (SENATE) SCHOLARSHIPS (30173) VALUE: $800
BAO NGUYEN
KRIZZIA RICAFORT
AMINA KHAN
DEANNA MORRA
KATHRYN CAMPEAU
STEPHANIE WILLIAMS
KARTIKA MEHAN
MICHAEL PATTERSON
CARLY STEPHENS
CLAIRE LAYTON
CHRISTINE NEWBIGGING
KEVIN BOCCIA
DIANE LIU
MARIKO BOWN-KAI
ANDREA KENNEDY
CHELSEA TIDD
ROBIN BALLANTYNE
AMBER BROWN
KATHY HOANG
TINA KOCIC
JUSTINE LALONDE
CHRISTINA LEE
LINDA MERKHAI
ANJA PERC
IRENE MINAJI
ANASTASIA TOMA
SARAH SANTOSUOSSO
ROMITA SUR
DANA KOLODZEY
SANDRA MCKAY
RITA ABDEL-BAKI
MILICA BIJELIC
SARAH-MARIE HUGH
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H ANTHRO, LV 2
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
H ANTHRO, LV 3
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 2
PSYCH & S/W, LV 2
H RELIG ST & SOCIOL, LV 3
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
H SOCIOL, LV 3
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
GEOG & S/W, LV 3
H ANTHRO & POL SCI, LV 3
H SOCIOL, LV 2
POL SCI & S/W, LV 3
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 4
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
ALEXA JOVICHEVICH
ADRIENNE O'SULLIVAN
JAMES WITTER
VICTORIA SABO
LEE JANZEN
TRAVIS MCCALLUM
SONYA BLAKE
SHREEMOUNA GURUNG
JULIANNA DILLER
GREGORY IARUSSO
LAUREN MCLEAN
SNEHA MORAES
ANEEQA ASLAM
CHANTE DE FREITAS
ANTONELLA FIDANZA BETANCOUR
CLAUDIA APARICIO
COURTNEY QUIGG
ABIGAIL VEERASINGHAM
MARINA KENNEDY
SOMYA GUPTA
MICHELLE KOOBS
SIXUAN ZHANG
NIMISHA DUBEY
EVAN ANDRADE
LINNEA GREMMEN
SHARISSA WOON SAM
JESSICA JENNISON
CHELSEA GABRIELE
YUAN GONG
MICHELLE MARCIL
KAREN MATEUS SALAS
CHANTELLE WARDAK
KELSEY DOUGHERTY
SCARLETT O'SHEA
LAURA PRESTON
BRYNA YOUNG
HANS ZURIEL
LINNEA BARFOOT
EVAN AL-KHATIB
NICHOLAS ABRAMS
THE UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS (60003) VALUE: $250
HEATHER PATTERSON
TAMMY JACKSON
ELZBIETA PIZOVIC
RICHARD KANARY
SHAUN FERGUSON
PAT VAUGHN
PROGRAM, LV
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
H PNB - MENTAL HEALTH, LV 3
H ECON, LV 3
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 3
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 3
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 2
H ANTHRO, LV 3
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H SOCIOL, LV 3
H GERONTOLOGY, LV 2
H POL SCI, LV 3
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 3
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 3
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 3
H ECON, LV 2
H CMST & POL SCI, LV 3
H ECON, LV 4
H ANTHRO, LV 2
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 2
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
SOCIOL, LV 2
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
SOCIOL & S/W, LV 3
H HEALTHST, LV 4
H ANTHRO, LV 2
H SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, LV 3
H ECON, LV 2
H ANTHRO & PSYCH, LV 3
SOCIOL, LV 2
H ANTHRO & RELIG ST, LV 3
HLTH,A&S & S/W, LV 3
H SOCIOL, LV 2
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 4
SOC SCI 1, LV 1
PSYCH & S/W, LV 2
SOCIAL SCIENCES, LV 2
THE UNIVERSITY PRIZES FOR SPECIAL ACHIEVEMENT* (40140) VALUE: $500
MURRAY CLAYTON
H ANTHRO, LV 4
RITA ABDEL-BAKI
H PSYCH-NEUROSCI&BEHAV, LV 3
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC-201309 Awards.docx
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Attachment II
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
2013/14 In-course and Graduand Awards
February 10, 2015
NAME
PROGRAM, LV
THE ALLAN R. VEALL SCHOLARSHIP IN ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (40132) VALUE: $1,000
MACKENZIE ROGERS
H ECON, LV 4
THE HARRY WAISGLASS BOOK PRIZE (50024) VALUE: $50
MALCOLM JOHNSON
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 4
THE MELINDA WAPSHAW ACHIEVEMENT AWARD* (40160) VALUE: $300
LINDSAY ROBINSON
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 3
KEEGAN TRAVIS
H LABR ST & POL SCI, LV 3
THE RALPH WEEKES SCHOLARSHIP* (40073) VALUE: $800
MEGAN JOHNSON
SHRUTI KAPADIA
H ECON, LV 4
H ECON & MATH, LV 3
THE ALVINA MARIE WERNER SCHOLARSHIP (50103) VALUE: $2,400
ERIN FEUTL
ANSA NARGIS
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 4
HLTH,A&S & S/W, LV 4
THE MARJORIE AND CHARLES WILKINSON SCHOLARSHIP (30191) VALUE: $450
MARIKO BOWN-KAI
H RELIG ST & SOCIOL, LV 3
DEREK ELLENS
H RELIG ST, LV 2
THE DAVID WINCH MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP (60016) VALUE: $500
HEATHER PATTERSON
MEGAN MEREDITH
HLTH,A&S & S/W, LV 3
H HEALTHST & GERONT, LV 2
THE WOUTERS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP (30376) VALUE: $1,000
KAITLIN AULD
H HEALTHST, LV 2
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = SOC SCI: 263
TOTAL NO. OF AWARDS FOR FACULTY = ALL: 2,327
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Attachment III
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
2013-14 H.L. Hooker & University Senate Allocations
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
UNIV. SENATE
H.L. HOOKER
FACULTY
TRANSCRIPT
NOTATION
ONLY**
$800
TOTAL
S.A. CUT
OFF
$1,500
TOTAL
S.A. CUT
OFF
TOTAL
TOTAL
ARTS & SCIENCE
1
$24,000
30
10.9
$18,000
12
11.6
$42,000
43
BUSINESS
2
$47,200
59
10.5
$27,000
18
11.4
$74,200
79
ENGINEERING
5
$96,800
121
10.7
$63,000
42
11.5
$159,800
168
HEALTH SCIENCES
6
$103,200
129
11.6
$64,500
43
11.9
$167,700
178
HUMANITIES
1
$48,000
60
10.4
$33,000
22
11.2
$81,000
83
$8,800
11
10.8
$6,000
4
11.3
$14,800
15
NURSING
SCIENCE
4
$248,000
310
11.1
$162,000
108
11.7
$410,000
422
SOCIAL SCIENCES
5
$56,000
70
10.4
$39,000
26
11.2
$95,000
101
TOTAL FOR ALL
24
$632,000
790
$412,500
275
$1,044,500
1089
TOTAL in 2012-13
27
$636,000
795
$231,000
154
$867,000
976
JOWETT.HOOKSEN_COUNT(2F)
The Dr. Harry Lyman Hooker Scholarships
Established in 1981, and resulting from the bequest of Dr. H.L. Hooker. Awarded for overall academic
excellence (Sessional Average of at least 9.5) to students in undergraduate programs, with the
exception of those in their graduating session and those retaining scholarships of $1,000 or greater.
Each year quotas are established for each Faculty and other academic units in proportion to the number
of full-time undergraduate students who obtain a Sessional Average of 9.5 or greater.
Value:
$1,500
The University (Senate) Scholarships
Made available by authorization of the Board of Governors of the University. Value: $800
NOTE: ** Students who transfer to graduate may retain the name and transcript notation, but forfeit the value of the award.
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\Hooker Senate Total.xlsx
Awards Report
Attachment IV
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
2013-14 AWARDS BY APPLICATION
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
AWARD
NO.
AWARD
COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTION AWARDS
VALUE
TOTAL AWARDED
NOT SELECTED
CERTIFICATE
33
35
NOT ELIGIBLE
TOTAL APPS
RECEIVED
TOTAL PAID
68
AWARDS FOR GRADUATING STUDENTS
B. MACKINNON MEMORIAL
50113
$800
C. MACNEILL PRIZE
50011
$175
J. R. MCCARTHY SCHP.
50030
$700
MUFF GRAD SCHP.
50084
$1,000
TOTAL
1
5
0
$0
6
$175
0
1
5
0
0
$0
6
$175
AWARDS FOR FULL & PART-TIME STUDENTS
0
ACCENTURE INC. SCHP.
40142
$850
ACHIEVEMENT-EXCEL.*
40085
$800
7
4
BRIEN,J.STAPLES SCHP.
40141
$350
1
19
2
22
$350
GWEN GEORGE
40143
$1,500
2
14
4
20
$3,000
3
3
GWEN GEORGE MEDAL (P-T ONLY)
60011
MEDAL
INTER-RESIDENCE COUNCIL
40144
$400
EDWARD JENKINS
40161
$5,000
11
1
$5,600
0
$0
1
$5,000
JOYCE "AMAZING" GRACE
40145
$2,500
3
16
19
$7,500
JOYCE AWARDS FOR ATHLETES
40117
$2,500
5
4
9
$12,500
3
3
$12,000
GARY LAUTENS MEMORIAL
40146
$4,000
J.D. MCNIE ACH. EXCELLENCE
40107
$800
MOSGROVE,E. SCHP.
40147
$1,500
1
MUFF IC AWARD
40151
$1,800
4
0
12
13
$1,500
4
$7,200
CONNIE O'SHAUGHNESSY MEM
40009
$425
1
1
1
3
$425
ROBERTSON, STANLEY SCHP.
40148
$2,500
2
34
3
39
$5,000
SPEARS,M. SCHP.
40149
$1,150
2
30
2
34
$2,300
STOAKLEY, M. SCHP.
40150
$425
2
13
3
18
$850
TRISTANI, F&C SCP.
40168
$2,500
1
1
3
5
$2,500
35
148
21
204
$65,725
1
7
$11,000
TOTAL
TRAVEL & EXCHANGE AWARDS
ALEXANDER,A.G. SCHP. (EXCHANGE)
35001
$5,500
2
4
ARTS & SCI EXPERIENTIAL
35002
$1,000
1
5
6
$1,000
BEALE-LINCOLN-HALL (EXCHANGE)
35003
$2,200
1
18
19
$2,200
3
6
2
11
$3,000
2
2
$0
1
$1,300
CHAN, M. FOR BUSINESS (EXCHANGE)
35004
$1,000
CIM INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
35005
$1,000
CLASS'37 TRAVEL A&S
35006
$1,300
DISCOVERY OF LANGUAGES
35023
$2,500
J. DUNBAR TRAVEL SCHP.
35007
$3,675
1
DUNN, J. TRAVEL SCHP
35007
$2,500
1
CLARA ELMAN TRAVEL SCHP.
35008
ERASMI TRAVEL TO ITALY
1
3
$0
1
$3,675
3
$2,500
$2,000
0
$0
35009
$1,000
0
$0
J.P. EVANS TRAVEL SCHP.
35011
$1,500
12
$0
FONG, J. INTERN. OUTREACH
35012
$2,500
LING & LANG TRAVEL (EXCHANGE)
35014
$925
1
2
2
12
1
1
1
1
0
$0
3
$925
2
$2,500
1
$2,000
MERKEL, R.W. TRAVEL SCHL
35015
$2,500
1
SALMON,E.T. TRAVEL
35018
$2,000
1
SCOTIABANK COMM. EXCHANGE
35019
$2,500
3
8
11
$7,500
VAJOCZKI, SUSAN LEGACY
35028
$1,000
1
1
2
$1,000
1
2
3
$2,500
WEBSTER, VIOLA FOREIGN STUDY
35026
$2,500
H.P. WHIDDEN TRAVEL
35021
$1,500
T.R. WILKINS TRAVEL
35022
$4,600
TOTAL
TOTAL OF ALL APPLICATIONS
JOWETT.IC_APPSCOUNT(F)
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UC By Application.xlsx
12
3
0
$0
15
$0
18
73
11
102
$41,100
87
261
32
380
$107,000
23%
69%
8%
100%
Awards Report
Attachment V
OFFICE OF STUDENT FINANCIAL AID & SCHOLARSHIPS
2013-14 IN-COURSE AND GRADUAND AWARDS NOT ALLOCATED
To Undergraduate Council Awards Committee
February 10, 2015
AWARD STATUS = 'A' (To be awarded in current year)
AWARD NAME
VALUE
40142 ACCENTURE INC. SCHP.
40088 ANATOMY PRIZE
NUMBER NOT
AWARDED
COMMENTS
$850
3
No applications received
$1,000
1
No nominations this year
30381 BANKIER,J.D. MEMORIAL
$400
2
No eligible candidate
30013 BLAKEY,B. MEMORIAL
$500
2
No eligible candidate
$1,000
1
No eligible candidate
$300
1
No eligible candidate
30384 CLASS '43 GOLD ANNIV SCH
$1,000
2
No eligible candidate
35023 DISCOVERY OF LANGUAGES
$2,500
1
No eligible candidate
35009 ERASMI TRAVEL TO ITALY
$1,000
1
No applications received
35011 EVANS TRAVEL SCHP
$1,500
1
No eligible candidate
35012 FONG, J. INTERN OUTREACH
$2,500
3
No applications received
35005 CIM INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
50107 CFUW MEMORIAL PRIZE
60011 GEORGE MEDAL
$400
1
No eligible candidate
40069 HUGHES SCHOLARSHIP
$200
1
No eligible candidate
40080 HUNTER,W.D.G. PRIZE
$500
3
No eligible candidate
50113 MACKINNON, B. MEMORIAL
$800
2
No applications received
30100 MARKS,L. SCHP
$800
5
No eligible candidate
50030 MCCARTHY SCHP.
$700
3
No applications received
$1,000
1
No applications received
$800
3
No applications received
50084 MUFF GRAD SCHP.
40107 MCNIE ACH. EXCELLENCE
40061 MOORE PRIZE
$125
3
No eligible candidate
$1,500
4
No applications received
$250
2
No eligible candidate
$4,600
1
No eligible candidate
NUMBER NOT AWARDED:
47
35021 WHIDEN, H.P. TRAVEL
40044 WILES MEMORIAL BOOK PRIZE
35022 WILKINS, T.R. TRAVEL
(7 last year)
AWARD STATUS = 'T' (No allocations to be made in current year)
AWARD NAME
VALUE
40155 BHADURI, C.L. SCHL. IN NU
30023 CHEM.INST.CAN.PRZ.
35008 ELMAN, CLARA TRAVEL SCHL.
40144 INTER-RESIDENCE COUNCIL S
$1,000
$150
$2,000
COMMENTS
Insufficient funds
Not offered
Insufficient funds
$400 Insufficient funds
30403 ROLLS,RONALD SCHL
$2,000
NEW; Insufficent funds
35017 RUNDLE FOREIGN STUDY
$2,500
Awarded every other year
35029 SHALOM TRAVEL
NUMBER NOT AVAILABLE TO AWARD:
Q:\UC_UCAC\2015\UCAC Not Awarded Update.docx
$725 Awarded every other year
7 (13 last year)
JOWETT.IC_NOTUSED(F)
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Agenda Item VIII
1.0
CHANGES TO EXISTING PROGRAMS:
1.1
Honours Medical Physics (B.Sc.)
{2443}
Admission Note
MATH 1B03, MED PHYS 1E03 and PHYSICS 1BB3 (or 1BA3 ) must be completed by the end of Level II.
Completion of at least two of these in Level I is strongly recommended.
Admission Note (Effective September 2015)
MATH 1B03, MED PHYS 1E03, and either PHYSICS 1BB3 or 1CC3 must be completed by the end of Level
II. Completion of at least two of these in Level I is strongly recommended.
Admission
Completion of any Level I program with a Cumulative Average of at least 6.0 including:
6 units from
•
MATH 1A03 - Calculus For Science I
•
MATH 1AA3 - Calculus For Science II
•
MATH 1LS3 - Calculus for the Life Sciences I
•
MATH 1LT3 - Calculus for the Life Sciences II
3 units
•
BIOLOGY 1A03 - Cellular and Molecular Biology
3 units
•
CHEM 1A03 - Introductory Chemistry I
3 units
•
PHYSICS 1B03 - Mechanics and Waves
9 units from
•
the Faculty of Science courses (See Admission Note above.)
Note:
A grade of at least C+ in two of MATH 1A03, 1AA3, 1B03, 1LS3, 1LT3, MED PHYS 1E03, PHYSICS 1B03,
1BA3 (or 1BB3) is required.
Students who have satisfied all above admission criteria and have a Cumulative Average between 5.5
and 5.9 will be admitted to the program, on Program Probation. Students may be on Program Probation
only once. Eligibility to continue in the program will require a Cumulative Average of at least 6.0 at the
next academic review.
Admission (Effective September 2015)
Completion of any Level I program with a Cumulative Average of at least 6.0 including:
3 units from
•
MATH 1A03 - Calculus For Science I
•
MATH 1LS3 - Calculus for the Life Sciences I
3 units from the following courses, with a grade of at least C+
•
MATH 1AA3 - Calculus For Science II
•
MATH 1LT3 - Calculus for the Life Sciences II
3 units
•
BIOLOGY 1A03 - Cellular and Molecular Biology
3 units
•
CHEM 1A03 - Introductory Chemistry I
3 units from the following courses, with a grade of at least C+
•
PHYSICS 1B03 - Mechanics and Waves
•
PHYSICS 1C03 - Physics for the Chemical and Physical Sciences
9 units
Agenda Item VIII
from the Faculty of Science Science I Course List (See Admission Note above.)
Admission (Effective September 2016)
Completion of any Level I program with a Cumulative Average of at least 6.0 including:
3 units from
•
MATH 1A03 - Calculus For Science I
•
MATH 1LS3 - Calculus for the Life Sciences I
3 units from the following courses, with a grade of at least C+
•
MATH 1AA3 - Calculus For Science II
•
MATH 1LT3 - Calculus for the Life Sciences II
3 units
•
BIOLOGY 1A03 - Cellular and Molecular Biology
3 units
•
CHEM 1A03 - Introductory Chemistry I
3 units from the following courses, with a grade of at least C+
•
PHYSICS 1A03 – Introductory Physics
•
PHYSICS 1C03 - Physics for the Chemical and Physical Sciences
9 units
from the Science I Course List (See Admission Note above.)
Note:
Students who have satisfied all above admission criteria and have a Cumulative Average between 5.5
and 5.9 will be admitted to the program, on Program Probation. Students may be on Program Probation
only once. Eligibility to continue in the program will require a Cumulative Average of at least 6.0 at the
next academic review.
Program Notes
1.
PHYSICS 1AA3, (1BB3) or 1CC3 must be completed by the end of Level II. Completion in Level I is
strongly recommended. PHYSICS 1BB3 (or 1BA3 ) must be completed by the end of Level II. Completion
in Level I is strongly recommended. Effective, September, 2015 PHYSICS 1BB3 or 1CC3 must be
completed by the end of Level II.
2.
MATH 1B03 must be completed by the end of Level II. Completion in Level I is strongly
recommended.
3.
MED PHYS 1E03 must be completed by the end of Level II. Completion in Level I is strongly
recommended.
4.
KINESIOL 2Y03, 2YY3 must be completed by the end of Level II. If KINESIOL 1Y03, 1YY3 have
been completed previously, these units will be taken as electives.
5.
Completion of CHEM 1AA3 is recommended as it serves as part of the prerequisite for CHEM
2OA3.
6.
Students who entered the program prior to September 2013, may substitute MED PHYS 3A03
for MED PHYS 3C03.
Requirements
120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which no more than 48 units may be Level I
Level I: 30 Units
30 units
(See Admission above.)
Level II: 30 Units
0-3 units from the following courses, if not completed in Level I:
•
PHYSICS 1BA3 or
•
PHYSICS 1BB3 - Modern Physics for Life Sciences
0-3 units
Agenda Item VIII
MED PHYS 1E03 - Physics in Medicine and Biology (if not completed in Level I)
0-3 units
•
MATH 1B03 - Linear Algebra I (if not completed in Level I)
0-3 units
•
PHYSICS 2C03 - Modern Physics
(if PHYSICS 1BA3 (or 1BB3) were completed in Level I.)
3 units
•
PHYSICS 2E03 - Mechanics
6 units
•
MATH 2A03 - Calculus III
•
MATH 2C03 - Differential Equations
6 units
•
MED PHYS 2B03 - Introductory Electricity and Magnetism
•
MED PHYS 2C03 - Electronics for Medicine and Biology
6 units
•
KINESIOL 2Y03 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
•
KINESIOL 2YY3 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
(See Program Note 4 above.)
0-9 units
•
Electives
Level II (Effective September 2015): 30 Units
0-3 units from the following courses, if not completed in Level I
•
PHYSICS 1AA3 – Introduction to Modern Physics
•
PHYSICS 1BB3 - Modern Physics for Life Sciences
•
PHYSICS 1CC3 - Modern Physics for the Chemical and Physical Sciences
0-3 units
•
MED PHYS 1E03 - Physics in Medicine and Biology (if not completed in Level I)
0-3 units
•
MATH 1B03 - Linear Algebra I (if not completed in Level I)
0-3 units
•
PHYSICS 2C03 - Modern Physics
(if PHYSICS 1AA3, 1BB3 or 1CC3 were has been completed in Level I.)
3 units
•
PHYSICS 2E03 - Mechanics
6 3 units from
•
MATH 2A03 - Calculus III
•
MATH 2X03 – Advanced Calculus I
3 units
•
MATH 2C03 - Differential Equations
6 units
•
MED PHYS 2B03 - Introductory Electricity and Magnetism
•
MED PHYS 2C03 - Electronics for Medicine and Biology
6 units
•
KINESIOL 2Y03 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I
•
KINESIOL 2YY3 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II
0-9 units
•
Electives
Level III: 30 Units
•
Agenda Item VIII
3 units
•
12 units
•
•
•
•
6 units
•
•
3 units
BIOLOGY 2B03 - Cell Biology
MED PHYS 3C03 - Operational Health Physics: Laboratory & Communication
MED PHYS 3R03 - Computational Medical Physics
MED PHYS 4B03 - Radioactivity and Radiation Interactions
MED PHYS 4T03 - Clinical Applications of Physics in Medicine
MATH 3C03 - Mathematical Physics I
MATH 3D03 - Mathematical Physics II
•
PHYSICS 3H03 - Intermediate Laboratory
0-3 units
•
PHYSICS 2C03 - Modern Physics (if not completed in Level II)
0-3 units
•
PHYSICS 3MM3 - Quantum Mechanics I (if PHYSICS 2C03 was has been completed in Level II.)
0-6 units
•
Electives
Level IV: 30 Units
12 units
•
MED PHYS 4D03 - Imaging in Medicine and Biology
•
MED PHYS 4R06 - Radiation and Radioisotope Methodology
•
MED PHYS 4U03 - Radiation Biology
0-3 units if not completed in Level III
•
PHYSICS 3MM3 - Quantum Mechanics I (if not completed in Level III)
15-19 units
•
Electives
Justification:
Admission requirements have been further modified as the Department no longer feels a
minimum grade in these two areas of study is necessary. These additional changes also parallel
changes made by the Department of Physics.
Agenda Item IX
ASSOCIATE VICE-PRESIDENT (FACULTY)
University Hall, Room 203
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
L8S 4K1
905.525.9140, Ext. 24672
Fax:
905.546.5213
E-mail: [email protected]
www.mcmaster.ca/vpacademic/
February 2015 TO: Undergraduate Council FROM: Susan Searls Giroux Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty RE: 2012-­‐13 and 2013-­‐14 IQAP Cyclical Program Reviews INTRODUCTION The purpose of Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) program reviews is to assist academic units in clarifying their objectives and to assess curriculum and pedagogical policies, including desirable changes for future academic development. Although the primary objective for these reviews is the improvement of our academic programs, the processes that we adopt are also designed to meet our responsibility to the government on quality assurance. The process by which institutions meet this accountability to the government is outlined in the Quality Assurance Framework (QAF), developed by the Ontario Councils of Academic Vice-­‐Presidents (OCAV). Institutions’ compliance with the QAF is monitored by the Ontario Universities Council on Quality Assurance, also known as the Quality Council, which reports to OCAV and the Council of Ontario Universities. The goal of McMaster’s IQAP is to facilitate the development and continued improvement of our undergraduate and graduate academic programs, and to ensure that McMaster continues to lead internationally in its reputation for innovation in teaching and learning and for the quality of its programs. McMaster’s IQAP is intended to complement existing mechanisms for critical assessment and enhancement, including departmental reviews and accreditation reviews. The uniqueness of each program emerges through the self-­‐study. All program review reports (including self studies, review team recommendations, departmental responses, and dean's implementation plans) are submitted to McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee, a joint committee of Undergraduate and Graduate Councils. The Quality Assurance Committee assesses all submitted reports and prepares a Final Assessment Report (FAR) for each program review conducted during the previous academic session. Each FAR: • Identifies significant strengths of the program; • Addresses the appropriateness of resources for the success of the program; • Identifies opportunities for program improvement and enhancement; • Identifies and prioritizes the recommendations; Agenda Item IX
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Undergraduate Council and/or Graduate Council will review this report to determine if it will make additional recommendations. 2012 -­‐ 13 IQAP CYCLICAL PROGRAM REVIEWS The following undergraduate program(s) were reviewed during 2012-­‐13: English and Cultural Studies (joint with graduate programs) 2013-­‐2014 IQAP CYCLICAL PROGRAM REVIEWS The following undergraduate programs were reviewed during 2013-­‐14: Arts & Science Bachelor of Technology – Four-­‐Year Degree Programs Bachelor of Technology – Degree Completion Programs Classics Health, Aging, & Society (joint with graduate programs) Nursing (joint with graduate programs) School of Geography and Earth Sciences (joint with graduate programs) Social Work (joint with graduate programs) The Final Assessment Reports for the reviews are attached. Agenda Item IX
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review Department of English and Cultural Studies Date of Review: April 29-­‐30, 2013 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the undergraduate programs delivered by the Department of English and Cultural Studies. This report identifies the significant strengths of the program, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out and prioritizes the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the Department of English and Cultural Studies Undergraduate and Graduate Programs In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the Department of English and Cultural Studies submitted a self-­‐study in March 2013 to the Associate Vice President Academic and Dean of Graduate Studies to initiate the cyclical program review of its undergraduate and graduate programs. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the Department. Two arm’s-­‐length external reviewers from New Brunswick and Ontario and one internal reviewer, selected from a set of proposed reviewers, examined the materials and completed a site visit on April 29 – 30, 2013. The visit included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President and Dean of Graduate Studies; Dean of Humanities, Associate Dean (Graduate Studies and Research), Faculty of Humanities, and the Chair of English and Cultural Studies. The reviewers met with the English and Cultural Studies Committee, Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, and the Teaching and Learning Committee as well as meeting with faculty members, departmental administrative staff and current undergraduate and graduate students. The Chair of the Department of English and Cultural Studies and the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities submitted responses to the Reviewers’ Report (July/August 2013). Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee agreed with the reviewers that faculty complement planning for the future is essential for the continued success of the existing graduate and undergraduate programs and that, unless additional hirings are made, the launching of new programs is inadvisable. At the same time, QAC shared the reviewers’ sense that this remains a “high-­‐achieving” department with “a satisfied and quite successful Agenda Item IX
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student body.” The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC to be submitted to Undergraduate Council and Graduate Council and Senate (December 2014). In their report (May 2013), the Review Team provided feedback that describes how the Department of English and Cultural Studies meets the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and are consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. The Review Team was very impressed with the clear and thorough documentation provided, as well as the thoughtful engagement of departmental administrators, faculty, students, and staff. The Department has undertaken significant planning exercises in the 18 months between the release of Forward with Integrity (FWI) and the submission of its review materials, and has proposed (and in some cases already begun implementing) a number of promising changes to the undergraduate curriculum and structures. In some significant areas (interdisciplinarity, internationalization, and community engagement, in particular) the Department already had anticipated the curricular directions FWI is designed to implement. The Review Team noted that in articulated learning outcomes for its undergraduate programs and mapping the outcomes onto the entire undergraduate curriculum, the department has gained an extraordinarily detailed (and enviable) understanding of what it assumes, teaches, and evaluates in each course. The Review Team’s overall impression was of a collegial, high-­‐achieving department that takes its instructional mission, both at the undergraduate and graduate level, very seriously, and that functions as an effective community in liaison with its staff and graduate students to offer strong undergraduate programs. The Dean of the Faculty of Humanities, in consultation with the Department Chair shall be responsible for monitoring the Implementation Plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐
month Follow Up Report and filed in the School of Graduate Studies. The Review Team noted some strengths and weaknesses of the program below: Strengths • The Department’s pedagogies and curricular orientations to the study of English literature and of culture and critical theory already positioned it (and several of its members in particular) well along the road to a practice of interdisciplinarity and internationalization as understood in FwI, and these practices can be expected to continue and to deepen. • Community engagement, another FwI priority, is woven into many faculty members’ teaching, research, and outreach activities, and self-­‐directed learning is supported by the independent research students are trained to do. • The curriculum in both streams is progressive, visionary, and in tune with leading-­‐edge research in both disciplines, the co-­‐existence of the two streams in a medium-­‐sized department that also supports three graduate programs has put some pressure on both of the undergraduate programs. • The Department is populated with effective, innovative, and committed teachers who use a variety of pedagogical approaches suggest that the Department is reinforcing its pedagogical goals with appropriate teaching and assessment modes and also striving to accommodate students with different learning styles and/or skill sets. • Student satisfaction with courses and quality of supervisory and supervisory committee support is very high in the graduate programs • Impressive time to completion rates for MA and PhD students Agenda Item IX
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Weaknesses • Experiential learning is an area that has not been fully developed in the Department • There appears to be unresolved tension between considering English and Cultural Studies and Critical Theory (CSCT) as separate streams and considering them as integrated • Cultural Studies courses tend to be clustered at the contemporary end of the spectrum, with some notable exceptions (e.g. strong courses in 18th Century literatures and cultures) • The continued pressure to grow graduate programs could compromise undergraduate education (and the priority given to it by FwI) further. Undergraduate students commented frequently on the non-­‐availability of courses of interest and/or the concurrent timetabling of courses they needed or hoped to take. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the Department’s and Dean’s Responses Recommendations for Undergraduate Programs 1. The Review Team recommended that consideration be given to loosening the BA English coverage requirements, to more firmly structuring the CSCT curriculum, and to developing new non-­‐cross listed CSCT courses. Response: The Department outlined that over the 2013-­‐14 academic year, the Curriculum Committee will work to rationalize and balance the programs. The Department recognized that the English offerings could be reduced and coverage requirements could be loosened. The Department noted that mounting new non-­‐cross-­‐listed CSCT courses could be a challenge due to the size of the program; however savings made through restructuring the English BA offerings may help to support CSCT, but only if the Faculty would permit the offering of some smaller classes. The Dean highlighted that the Faculty is asking all Departments to review program requirements to ensure that they provide students with a quality education while not making unnecessary demands on the teaching and supervisory capacity of the Department. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair and Curriculum Committee Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 2. The Review Team recommended reviving the proposal for the Creative Writing and Community Engagement specialization. Response: The Department advised that it would work with the new Acting Dean in 2013-­‐14 to establish this specialization. The Department will work on ways to support the new specialization through savings in its English undergraduate offerings and by seeking other sources of funding. The Acting Dean will work with members of the Department to make the model sustainable and he noted that he sees the potential for the proposal to be expanded beyond the English Department so as to engage and benefit students in other programs. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair with Acting Dean Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 3. The Review Team recommended that further consideration be given to development of experiential learning opportunities (e.g. the creative writing specialization, internships, cross-­‐
listings with courses offering practicum components). Agenda Item IX
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Response: The Department highlighted that the CWCE specialization has internship and practicum components. The Department also noted that it will work to develop a 6-­‐unit, level 3 or 4 Experiential Education Course, building on ties with the Hamilton Public Library and the Hamilton/Wentworth District School Board. The Department and Acting Dean both advised that the Department will work in tandem on this with the new Humanities Target Learning and Experiential Education Centre, which is mandated to develop these opportunities across the Faculty. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair with the Humanities Target Learning and Experiential Education Centre Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 4. The Review Team recommended that efforts be made to plan and make known its course offerings (however provisionally) on a two-­‐year cycle, and to avoid timetabling conflicts. Response: The Department advised that it would be in a better position to commit, in the Timetable and Calendar to a provisional two-­‐year cycling of undergraduate offerings following the reduction and restructuring of the English BA offerings. The Dean noted that the Faculty will work with the Department to help establish the two-­‐year cycling course offerings and to see whether they can identify key timetabling conflicts that may be of particular concern to students. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair and Office of the Dean Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report Recommendations for Graduate Programs 1. The Review Team recommended that a “theory and methods of cultural studies” half course be developed for MA and PhD students entering from more traditional English programs. Response: The Department outlined that the Graduate Studies Committee, the CSCT Executive, and Graduate Caucus will work together to survey new graduate students to determine the demand for such a course, to be offered in Term 1 each year. If there is sufficient interest to fill a class, we will design and pilot such a course for 2014-­‐15. Responsibility for Following Up: Department in collaboration with Graduate Studies Committee, CSCT Executive and Graduate Caucus Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 2. The Review Team recommended that a credit/non-­‐credit “professionalization” half-­‐course be developed for third year doctoral students. Response: The Department advised that it would survey the graduate students about repackaging the professionalization seminars into a pass/fail doctoral 3-­‐unit course. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 3. The Review Team recommended that (subject to staffing), the historical depth of the cultural studies courses be extended. Response: The Department responded that that the Graduate Chair would work with graduate instructors to enhance the historical depth of the course offerings. The Department noted that some Agenda Item IX
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courses on medieval and early modern culture take on issues of gender, sexuality and class in light of contemporary cultural theory. The Acting Dean suggested that perhaps more could be done to alert students in the Cultural Studies and Critical Theory program about the number of courses dealing with medieval and early modern culture. Responsibility for Following Up: Graduate Chair Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 4. The Review Team recommended that efforts be made to facilitate the cross-­‐appointment of faculty members from related units (e.g. Theatre and Film Studies, Communication Studies and Multimedia, Music, and Art History). Response: The Department advised that it will press annually for the loan of faculty from elsewhere, many of whom have expressed strong interest in teaching for the program. The Acting Dean noted that it is very interested in facilitating the interaction of programs that can contribute to one another’s undergraduate and graduate teaching. The Acting Dean suggested that the Faculty would do what it can to support faculty members design courses that can meet the requirements of students in several programs. Responsibility for Following Up: Office of the Dean and Department Chair Timeline: Follow Up at 18-­‐month Report Recommendations for Undergraduate and Graduate Programs 1. The Review Team recommended that serious attention be given to complement planning for DEC, given impending retirements, and to replacements in core areas (e.g. Early Modern and African diasporic literatures/cultures). Response: The Department noted that it has prepared a list of hiring priorities as part of its five-­‐year plan of 2012. The Department is keen to work with the new Acting Dean on complement planning. The Acting Dean suggested that the Department should be thinking about complement planning at the same time as it considers making changes to the structure of its undergraduate programs. 2. The Review Team recommended that further efforts be made to create teaching fellowships for senior PhD students. Response: The Department highlighted that it remains active in pressing for Teaching Fellowships for senior PhD candidates. The Acting Dean noted that the University was in the process of negotiating an agreement with CUPE Unit 2 (representing sessional instructors) and that he hopes that the contract will better accommodate the hiring of current PhD students as instructors. The Faculty will continue to work with Departments to find ways to provide students with this crucial professional development experience. 3. The Review Team recommended that a senior Teaching Assistant be appointed annually to train and advise newer Teaching Assistants. Response: The Department advised that beginning in September 2013, it will dedicate a .5 senior teaching assistant annually to lead Term 1 TA training and to serve as a resource and support person to all new TAs. Agenda Item IX
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The Acting Dean noted that the Faculty will explore this and other proposals to improve the uses of tutorials and teaching assistants. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair Timeline: Follow Up at 18-­‐month Report 4. The Review Team recommended that the Department retain control of its communal spaces (e.g. seminar rooms and lounge). Response: The Department advised that it saw no immediate danger of losing its valuable communal work and teaching spaces. Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation The program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow-­‐up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. Agenda Item IX
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review Arts & Science Program Date of Review: April 8 -­‐ 9, 2014 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the Arts and Science program. This report identifies the significant strengths of the program, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the Arts & Science Program In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the Arts & Science Program submitted a self-­‐study in March 2014 to the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty to initiate the cyclical program review of its programs. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the Department. One arms-­‐length reviewers from the University of Bristol and one internal reviewer, selected from a set of proposed reviewers, examined the materials and completed a site visit on April 8 -­‐ 9, 2014. The visit included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President (Faculty); Associate Vice-­‐President (Teaching and Learning); Assistant Director, Student Recruitment; Director of the program and meetings with a group of current students, full-­‐time faculty and support staff. The Director of the Arts and Science Program and the Associate Vice-­‐President (Faculty) submitted responses to the Reviewers’ Report (Oct/Dec 2014). Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that the program is functioning well and that there are no significant academic issues that have not been addressed. The QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow-­‐up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC to be submitted to Undergraduate Council and Senate (February 2014). In their report (May 2014), the Review Team provided feedback that describes how the Arts & Science Agenda Item IX
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Program meets the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and is consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. The Review Team highlighted that the Arts & Science program is a truly innovative and exciting initiative that should be held in the highest esteem and central to the University’s internationalization strategy. The reviewers noted that the program is driven by the clear, purposeful and visionary leadership of the director and the program benefits from a truly innovative pedagogical program that is unique in North America and beyond. The decision to bring together Arts & Science into a coherent framework for intellectual study not only provides students with a broad range of skills and competences that allows them to follow many diverse career paths. The report also highlighted that the program places the University at the center of many of the truly interdisciplinary pedagogical debates today which demands that we appreciate the science of the arts, along with the poetics of scientific enquiry. The following program strengths and weaknesses were noted: Strengths ! In addition to the strengths listed above, the reviewers drew attention to the “shared sense of pride [in] and belonging” to a vibrant academic program evidenced among faculty, students, staff, and alumni alike. They noted the successful linking by faculty of their research with their teaching; the serious way in which student feedback is taken; and the way in which the Discovery initiative has created a volunteering ethos. Weaknesses ! Recommendations made by the reviewers to address perceived weaknesses have been embraced and acted upon. There appear to be no overriding concerns apart from the inevitable dependence of the program’s vitality on a strong director. The Director of the Arts & Science Program submitted a response to the Reviewers’ Report (October 2014). The Associate Vice-­‐President (Faculty) submitted her response to the Reviewers’ Report and the Program’s Response in December 2014. Specific recommendations were discussed, along with follow-­‐
up actions to aid in addressing the recommendations. The Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty in consultation with the Program Director shall be responsible for monitoring the recommendation implementation plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐month Follow-­‐up Report and filed in the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty’s Office. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the Program’s and Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty’s Responses Recommendations 5. Explore the possibility of introducing introductory modules that address the science of the arts and the poetics of science Response: The Director advised that the program will discuss the noted curricular lacks and consider the idea of a set of introductory lectures or a core module on the science of the arts and the poetics of the sciences. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of Arts & Science Program Agenda Item IX
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Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 6. Employ a dedicated marketing member to the support staff to focus intently on improving the international reputation of the program Response: The Director advised that a Digital Communications Specialist was recently hired to assist with developing a web and social media presence and that plans are underway to engage students especially in developing marketing materials. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of Arts & Science Program Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 7. Continue to develop the unique and productive relationship with MIIETL Response: The Director highlighted that the program will continue to develop its unique and productive relationship with MIIETL. The partnership is promising and valuable, particularly in the opportunities it opens up for Arts & Science students, and the program will endeavour to involve greater numbers of Arts & Science faculty members in ongoing and new collaborative ventures with MIIETL. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of Arts & Science Program Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report 8. Consider a Student-­‐led Arts and Science Journal Response: The Director noted that a consultation meeting would take place to discuss the possibility of a student-­‐led Arts & Science journal. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of Arts & Science Program Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 9. Hold a consultation meeting on the development of a Graduate program that would appeal more to an international student base. Response: The Director indicated that the program will begin consultations about the possibility of developing a graduate program in Arts & Science, especially one that would appeal to an international student base. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of Arts & Science Program Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 6. Faculty Renewal Response: The Director advised that faculty renewal continues to be one of the program’s top priorities. The program will continue to negotiate new three-­‐year secondments of faculty members from various departments and Faculties, and will continue to work collaboratively to create new shared appointments, as we have done in the case of our two CLA positions shared with MIIETL and other units. The Director further noted that the program has recently reduced its reliance on retired faculty (though they affirm the tremendous value of some degree of emeritus engagement) and they are committed to a healthy balance of regular faculty members and sessional instructors. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of Arts & Science Program Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report Agenda Item IX
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10. Move the program to a more suitable location that will make it more visible on campus and reflective of its esteem. Response: The Director highlighted that the program is eager to explore possibilities of the moving the Program to a more prestigious and spacious setting on campus. At the same time, the Director noted that the program would gladly join in discussions about prospects for expansion of McMaster’s downtown campus, with an eye to establishing a base for some activities (e.g. the McMaster Discovery Program) there. The Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty noted that space on campus is at a premium, but highlighted that the program is willing to consider an increased presence in Hamilton’s diverse downtown core, which would augment its commitment to internationalizing efforts and to community engagement. Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that the program is functioning well and that there are no significant academic issues that have not been addressed. The QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow-­‐up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. Agenda Item IX
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review School of Engineering Technology Bachelor of Technology Four-­‐Year Degree Programs DCP Program Stream Date of Review Automotive and Vehicle April 22 – 23, 2014 Technology (AVT) Biotechnology (BIO) April 29 – 30, 2014 Process Automation Technology June 2 -­‐ 3, 2014 (PAT) Management (GEN TECH) February 24 -­‐ 25, 2014 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the four-­‐year degree programs delivered by the School of Engineering Technology. This report identifies the significant strengths of the programs, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out and prioritizes the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the Programs in the School of Engineering Technology In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the School of Engineering Technology submitted four separate self-­‐studies in January -­‐ March 2014 to the Associate Vice-­‐
President, Faculty to initiate the cyclical program review of its undergraduate and graduate programs. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the School. Two arm’s length external reviewers and one internal reviewer for each program were endorsed by the Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, and selected by the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty. The review teams reviewed the self-­‐study documentation and then conducted site visits to McMaster University between February – June, 2014. The visits included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Director of the School of Engineering Technology, chairs of each of the program streams and meetings with groups of current and former undergraduate students, full-­‐time faculty and support staff. The reviewers also had the opportunity to tour the School of Engineering Technology. The Director of the School of Engineering Technology and the Program Chairs submitted a joint response to the Reviewers’ Report in October 2014. The Associate Dean Academic submitted a response on behalf of the Faculty of Engineering in December 2014. Specific recommendations were discussed and Agenda Item IX
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clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that the programs are functioning well and that there are no significant academic issues that are not being addressed. The QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC to be submitted to Undergraduate Council and Senate (February 2014). In their reports, the Review Teams provided feedback that describes how the four-­‐year programs in the School of Engineering Technology meet the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and are consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. Executive summaries for each of the stream reviews are below. DCP Stream Executive Summary Automotive & Based on information gained from the on-­‐site review, the self-­‐study, Vehicle Technology consultation with members of the program and the University, independent (AVT) assessments and all material submitted as part of the program review, the review team is convinced that the AVT B.Tech program structure is good, has notably strong and creative attributes, and does not seem to have a lot of issues. Interviewed students did appreciate the program curriculum. The visiting team has identified possibilities for improvement implementations related to several areas of the program. Of these, the highest priority should be given to: • Reducing the number of CLAs and sessional instructors. • Improving the CO-­‐OP system by making it more flexible. • Formally introducing the design process, hand sketching, tolerancing and GDT, into the AVT curriculum. • Laboratory enhancements by including creative open-­‐ended technical challenges. • Reduction or combining of GEN TECH courses. • Some room for electives in both the AVT and GEN TECH areas should be created when the program is fully resourced and at steady state. Biotechnology (BIO) In the relatively short period since its start, the Biotechnology Program has developed into a unique, effective and sound academic program. The latest curriculum is largely appropriate to the field of biotechnology and the developmental changes are all well substantiated. The Program strengths identified by the spectrum of students interviewed are strongly endorsed by the reviewers. It is also noted that student assessment of their professors indicates a strong appreciation of their contributions to the success of the Program. The program is intensive but endorsed by the review. The Co-­‐op experience clearly is a challenge for second year students but is of significant benefit to the students and demonstrates the value of the program and its graduates to potential employers. The collaboration between McMaster University and Mohawk College, together with the sharing of resources and personnel has to be positively acknowledged. It is a successful model that sets a valuable target for other University/College initiatives and clearly will be recognized by funding agencies as meeting their objectives in these times of limited resources for Agenda Item IX
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post-­‐secondary education in Canada. In general, the feedback from students and faculty is that it has been an effective partnership. The reviewers concur with the current view that certification as professional engineers or biologists should be a continuing exercise but at this time the presence of any constraints to the still being fine-­‐tuned program should be avoided. The teaching loads of faculty in the program are high by Canadian University norms in principally undergraduate programs but fit the pattern currently existing in Canadian Technical Colleges. We have identified that there are faculty in the Program with significant research background and interest. We believe that applied research with biotechnology companies in Ontario would be of benefit also for students and potential research faculty in the Program. This commitment would not only raise the profile of the Program with the expanding industry with research needs but also comply with the McMaster University Mission Statement. Possible funding sources for University/College/Industry collaborative research are identified. The current system of governance seems appropriate to the collaborative nature of the program and the McMaster administrative structure. Further integration with industry is a major issue for this program and any measures that contribute to this endeavor should be supported. Process Automation The PAT BTech program addresses a niche area in the market. There is good Technology (PAT) demand from applicants, there are employment opportunities for graduates, and the program is complementary to, rather than competitive with, other engineering programs offered by McMaster University. The curriculum is well-­‐balanced between a substantial laboratory component, technical courses, and general technology courses. The program has also undergone adjustment following monitoring, self-­‐assessment and review. The program has had consistently strong enrollment. The overall standard is solid and retention is good. The personnel interviewed were enthusiastic, positive, and committed, and the general morale appeared to be high. Some areas of concern to be addressed were highlighted including stability of teaching staff, emphasizing communication skills throughout, the effectiveness of co-­‐op program placement and updating Laboratory equipment and software used in teaching. The program currently is not an Honours program. Should this designation be desired in the future, then more emphasis should be placed on design and synthesis (not just analysis) throughout the curriculum and a final design thesis resulting from a major project course should be much more enhanced. Finally, the PAT B.Tech program is not accredited by Professional Engineers Ontario. This fine as it is part of the differentiation between the B.Tech programs and other regular engineering programs, which defines its special niche in the market. It would be sufficient to define, for those few who are interested, a clear path to Professional Engineering certification after graduation by completing certain courses to be specified. Agenda Item IX
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General Technology The assessment of the Bachelor of Technology (General Technology – 4 Year Program) by the external review team was prepared on the basis of information gathered from a two-­‐day onsite visit, document review, as well as meetings with a range of members representing faculty, administration, staff, current students, and alumni. The external reviewers’ report addresses the 13 areas of program review outlined in the Guidelines for the Review Team and includes assessments, observations, and comments on the program as well as recommendations and suggestions for the program’s consideration. In summary, the strengths of this program include its alignment and support of the University’s mission, an interdisciplinary focus on engineering as well as management knowledge that provides students with a unique capacity to meet industry and organizational needs, a “3D” focus that equips students with theoretical knowledge and hands-­‐on experience through co-­‐operative education and laboratory work, strong enrolment growth, a team of dedicated full-­‐time faculty instructors with strong industry experience, small class sizes, access to leading edge laboratory facilities and institutional library facilities, proactive curriculum changes resulting in content more clearly aligned with management trends and issues, active engagement of community partners in Advisory Committees for the various components of the program, the emerging awareness of the program both by students and industry employers, and a strong model of the ways in which to govern, structure, and operationalize a university/college articulation agreement. Concerns and challenges outlined in the report include the current admission entrance averages for the program, the significant number of classes taught by sessional instructors, the growing percentage of sections taught by full-­‐time faculty on an overload basis, the lack of engagement in the co-­‐op process by a number of students, the challenge of having students recognize earlier in the program the importance of the management and communication courses for their co-­‐op and long-­‐term career success, a lack of clarity regarding career pathways – particularly for students who want to pursue a P.Eng. designation, the desire by some students to have the program branded as a McMaster program rather than a McMaster-­‐Mohawk program, and some confusion or at least a lack of clarity related to the brand messaging regarding the B.Tech brand noted by students during employer interviews. Suggestions and recommendations provided by the reviewers include points related to the review of the existing Memorandum of Understanding with Mohawk College, admissions, branding and communications strategies, course deliverables, and enhancing stakeholder engagement including alumni and the PEO. The following program strengths and weaknesses were noted: Strengths ! AVT: The program is making effective use of its physical and financial resources in offering a high quality curriculum with strong emphasis on experiential learning. Its lab facilities are good. Agenda Item IX
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BIO: This is a unique, effective, and sound academic program, with curriculum that is appropriate to its field. Students rate the teaching and performance of their professors highly. The labs are well designed and equipped. Cooperation between McMaster and Mohawk has been effective. PAT: The program is of good quality, having achieved a good balance between theory and practice. The curriculum provides good coverage, from general fundamentals to relevant specialized topics; it reflects the current state of the field. The program is well served by its leadership. GEN TECH: The program appears viable and relevant, given its healthy admission numbers. Graduates are well-­‐equipped with theoretical knowledge, critical thinking capacity, and hands on experience in both management and technology. They are well positioned as attractive recruits with strong potential for long-­‐term career success. Weaknesses The major concern raised by the reviewers of these programs is common to all of them: excessive dependence on Contractually Limited Appointments and on sessional lecturers. Responses to the reviews suggest that this concern is being addressed, though the situation certainly warrants careful monitoring. Dissatisfaction with the functioning of co-­‐op requirements was also commonly expressed; responses indicate that a number of steps have been taken to improve the co-­‐op experience. The Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, in consultation with the Director of the School of Engineering Technology and the chairs of the programs shall be responsible for monitoring the recommendations implementation plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐month Follow Up Report and filed in the Office of the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the School’s and the Faculty’s Responses Recommendations DCP Review Team Recommendations Program Chair and Faculty’s Timeline Stream Response AVT Recommendations to adjust the We are not in support of these Update at 18-­‐
wording of 6 of our 9 Program changes as they decrease the month follow Learning Outcomes (PLOs) were expected level of student up made. performance Suggestions were made to substitute “engineering Courses taught in the BTech Program knowledge” with “technical require students to learn competence”, to substitute engineering “engineering fundamentals” with knowledge and engineering “specialized knowledge of fundamentals. engineering technology The Faculty noted that it is entirely fundamentals”, and to substitute appropriate for a B.Tech program to “engineering tools” with “use of each aspects of Engineering. technical tools” Learning outcomes associate with these aspects use terms such as Another suggestion was to Engineering Knowledge. replace “solving complex B.Tech. offers some courses that are engineering problems” with cross-­‐listed with engineering “solving engineering technology departments and several B.Tech Agenda Item IX
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problems” In addition, the review team suggests downgrading the level of complexity suggested by the PLOs by eliminating the term “complex” in all PLOs or substituting “modern engineering tools to a range of engineering activities from simple to complex” with “modern technical simple to moderately complex tools” Reference should not be made to the CEAB, since the B.Tech program is not accredited GEN TECH instructors for upper year technical courses (e.g. Quality Control and Assurance, Engineering Economics, etc.) should be taught by Professional Engineers Experiential learning components need to be adjusted to include more hand sketching, design process, tolerances, and GDT The name of many of the courses needs to change to better describe what is being taught More flexible lab experiments should be incorporated to foster creativity and expose students to more challenging problems include material on tolerances courses use the same textbook as the engineering equivalent courses. Our students are required to solve similar problems to B.Eng. students. The review team did not review our course outlines or look closely at assignments, tests, and exams and was not in a position to properly assess the complexity of problems solved by students in our program. We make use of CEAB guidelines Update at 18-­‐
(published publicly on their website) month follow so that we are closely aligned to PEO up requirements, making the pathway to P.Eng. licensing as smooth as possible. We did not mean to imply in any way that we are affiliated with their organization. The Faculty supports the objectives of the program in this regard and will work with the program to ensure no misunderstanding regarding the accreditation status of the program. We have taken this into consideration in the past and will continue to hire instructor with academic qualifications and industry experience that best supports course outcomes The formal design process will be taught during the Fall 2014 semester in the Advance CAD course and in the Technical Report courses These suggestions will be incorporated in our next curriculum changes for 2015-­‐2016 This will be implemented in upper year labs where possible Material tolerances and GDT has Agenda Item IX
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and GDT, rather than strictly CAD courses to ensure that we are not simply training technologists Incorporate mandatory tutorials and reduce number of tests in Math courses GEN TECH courses should be tailored to each stream If at all possible, faculty should have their P.Eng. license BIO There are clearly some faculty and students who have demonstrated ability to make significant contributions in applied research with industry which would strengthen the program’s integration with industry High school students should be required to have Biology 12U for admission to the program Suggestions for improvement could include expanding the scope of microbial potential into areas like bioremediation, biological pest control, bio-­‐
mining, environmental waste already been implemented in the Fall 2014 semester in a CAD course and in a manufacturing course. The CAD training our students receive is part of what differentiates them from Engineers and is highly valued by employers – many student secure co-­‐ops because of it. Where possible, GEN TECH courses provide students with opportunities to choose project topics related to their interests (Usually within their field/program stream) This is something that is being strongly encouraged at the faculty and departmental level. Funds have been assigned to cover the cost of application and registration fees for B.Tech full-­‐time faculty The Faculty supports the program in considering the Licensure status in a balanced approach to hiring. We strongly encourage our interested faculty to seek collaborative grants with industry for applied & industrial research and to involve co-­‐op and technical report students This is now a possibility, since our intake is moving from a common first year to stream-­‐specific application process. We will attempt to add Biology 12U to the Academic Calendar changes for the 2015-­‐16 year We agree and many of these topics are already being included in level 3 and 4 such as Biotechnology II (3BO3), Biotechnology III (4TB3) and Technical Reports I and II (4TR1, 4TR3). Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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spillage clean up and new bio products. The latest changes are appropriate to the field and justified by student, faculty and industry feedback. The program is to be applauded for the speed with which the changes were made. Use of AV equipment labs is ideal from pedagogical standpoint, creating maximum levels of interaction Lab component should be included in level 1 Biology course Increased emphasis on developing communication skills would be valuable Ensure that new lab course laboratories (Food Microbiology, for instance) have appropriate technical support Donor recognition for contributions of equipment and software should be in place Could be beneficial to create a custom reading library with some specialized academic and trade publications specific to biotechnology to supplement library resources and encourages students to stay abreast of hot topics Student surveys suggest that students are frustrated with the co-­‐op search process. It was suggested to create a one-­‐page skills sheet that students can use in their job search Survey feedback indicates that response times from faculty are not always satisfactory. It was recommended to implement the Teaching Portfolio technique for This has been added, effective Winter 2015 Revisions to first year communications courses have already occurred and student skills are being assessed to determine if improvement has been made We are hiring more students in the Fall to assist with lab support and will consider hiring an addition Lab Technician if needed We have an industry partner’s page online as part of our website. We will ensure that all Biotechnology donors are listed appropriately We agree with this suggestion and will look into how to take action on this space wise Update at 18-­‐
month follow up We have hired a graphic designer to put together a package of marketing materials that students can use in their job hunt – this will include stream specific flyers with skill-­‐sets listed. We agree with this suggestion and will be looking into ways to integrate/encourage Teaching Portfolios by faculty members Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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PAT faculty Faculty should receive course relief to pursue applied research – ideally with industry partners, which would allow for student experience in these initiatives. This could be supported by government funding. Certification of graduates as professional engineers or as professional biologists (if this designation moves to Ontario) could be beneficial to the program and its students The participation of students and faculty in conferences, workshops etc. are opportunities to raise the profile of both the program and its students Industry events and special guest lectures should continue Instructors should be provided with opportunities to participate in training Integration with other departments should be approached with caution so as not to disrupt the small, exclusive learning environment that students seem to enjoy in B.Tech 12% of admitted students are transfers from the B.Eng program The percentage of women in the program is very low Students expressed interest in splitting the course on automation and robotics into 2 to allow more in-­‐depth knowledge We will encourage BIO faculty to Update at 18-­‐
build relationships with industry and month follow pursue grants to support applied up research where possible Major curriculum modifications have Update at 18-­‐
already taken place to better align month follow with PEO requirements for up Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering licensing. This will continue to be under consideration moving forward. This is happening but to a limited degree. A professional development account for this purpose will be included in the budget for the 2015-­‐
16 fiscal year. We agree and have funds set aside for this purpose These are available through MIIETL. We will ensure that opportunities are communicated to instructors We may consider collaborating with Chemical Engineering in the form of cross-­‐listed undergraduate or graduate courses (should a Master’s level program be created), and will keep this caution in mind. 20 seats out of 240 are currently reserved for this purpose for all three 4 year programs Agreed for PAT and AVT – initiatives are underway to address this within the faculty as a whole Aware of the suggestion but find it difficult to identify which course to “sacrifice” to allow for this additional course. This will be addressed Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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and training in robotics programming Students would like the course on systems design and specifications earlier in the program of study Report writing and communication learning outcomes need more attention Examining a sample of final exams revealed lack of synthesis type problems and open-­‐ended questions Core faculty are on limited (3-­‐4 years) contract renewable only once and some are approaching this limit The quality of equipment in some Mohawk labs is not up to standards; many pieces of equipment are covered in dust and several are not operational which affects the conduct of the Labs and are not conducive to an effective learning environment. Improve equipment cleanliness and appearance in these Labs More electrical schematic content should be included in the CAD course Update and renew instruments used in control theory and application courses (some PC boards do not work, and PLCs and during the Summer 2015. The Faculty supports the program in resisting curriculum overload but asks that they review this issue on an ongoing basis as part of the annual curriculum review. This will be discussed in Summer 2015 for the 2016-­‐17 curriculum This has probably improved with the redesign of the 1st year communication courses that were introduced in 2013-­‐14. A discussion with all instructors will be initiated to emphasize the need for attention and feedback on the communication aspects of submitted reports Valuable observation. It will be Update at 18-­‐
shared with the faculty and there month follow will be discussion on the inclusion of up more synthesis-­‐type problems in tests. The School of Engineering Technology has had a number or teaching track positions approved to address this issue This has been largely addressed with the move to ETB/B111 in Summer 2014 This is included in the course description, but has been overlooked for the sake of more 3D modeling practice. Will be assessed in Summer 2015 Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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micro-­‐controllers are not state-­‐
of-­‐the-­‐art, etc) The general courses offered early in the program are less appreciated by the students. Assign effective instructors to the GenTech courses to make them more relevant to the material to follow in subsequent years and increase their value to the students Emphasize developing communication skills in every course throughout the curriculum. Course titled Manufacturing systems should have much enhanced systems content (or be renamed). As it stands it is more about manufacturing technologies, not systems – the systems aspects are not addressed. The used text book also is about manufacturing technology Pay attention to the pedagogy of software being taught and ensure that the software is consistent with industry use (e.g. OPC software, robot programming and others) Increase awareness of industry, as potential employers and hosts of co-­‐op students of the B.Tech. program through more promotion, participation in fairs, etc. Increase industrial tours to enhance students’ awareness of the practical applications of what they study. Introduce an “engineering tour report” in the course content as a means of increasing the value gained from the visit and also enhancing the communication skills training The GenTech curriculum has recently been redesigned to address relevance issues and more qualified instructors have been appointed Agree with the idea to emphasize communication throughout technical and management courses Will be discussed with instructor and re-­‐examined in Summer 2015 for 2016 – 2017 curriculum With the exception of the robot programming software (MELFA), all software used is the industry standard. We are forced to use MELFA by the existing robotics equipment Ongoing initiative to increase Update at 18-­‐
industry awareness will continue month follow up We have done these in the past and will continue to look for opportunities to do so moving forward Agenda Item IX
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GEN TECH Enhance faculty career path and stability. Increase faculty and instructors’ participation in leadership development programs, mentoring activities, and professional and career development, including offering some paid time-­‐off or course relief to engage in these activities Increased industry collaboration should be encouraged in the form of guest lectures and involvement in student project The discrepancy between B.Eng. and B.Tech. admission requirements is creating a divide and leading to the perception that B.Tech is an inferior program Students felt that communications courses were seen as “filler”. Second year students question the contribution to their education of these communication courses Consistent reminders of the ‘What’s in it for me?’ factor may help students connect academic content to workplace practices Students felt that lecture should be shortened and tutorials enhanced Already in progress (e.g MIIETL research fellows program). More action is needed. Should be discussed with other Program Chairs and Director This has already been identified as a priority and has funds devoted to support it (via the Woodbridge Lectureship) We intend to continue to lessen the gap between the entrance averages as much as possible over the coming years The Faculty encourages programs to seek students with strong academic records; however, it does not believe it is essential for the B.Tech and B.Eng. to have similar entry requirements. These comments refer to the course as it existed prior to hiring a full-­‐time faculty member to re-­‐design the curriculum and manage instruction. Recent offerings of the course have not produced similar sentiments amongst students We agree and will continue to look for ways to actualize this Computer labs were introduced in the second half of the 1st year communications course in Winter 2014 and will become a component Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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Fourth year students expressed the wish to have more case studies in the curriculum Recommendation to augment current assessment measures with AOL (Assurance of Learning) testing similar to what is required of AACSB qualification through external testing It is suggested that sessional instructors have an assigned mentor or be asked to sit in on classes conducted by those with exceptional teaching scores Improved communication with sessional instructors is essential A Writing Centre on campus (especially ESL) students whose communication skills are weak would be helpful Graduates stated they would have liked more training in public speaking Better tracking and connection with alumni in both parts of Fall 2014. As well, computer labs were introduced in the Project Management course as of Fall 2014. Cases are part of the active learning activities and exercises in many courses; however, based on feedback from students we have moved away from longer case analysis requiring advanced preparation out of class Currently there is no AOL outcome based assessment testing designed for hybrid technology management programs available. Agencies that offer these services are focused on measuring traditional business school curriculum only This recommendation has already been considered; however, logistical challenges have made it difficult to implement We agree with this recommendation We are internally developing a drop in centre for students for help in writing and communciation Currently, group presentations are used in both first year communications courses. Could explore opportunities for extracurricular activities for public speaking development (i.e. Toastmaster type club or a competition of sort) Our Recruiting and Promotion Coordinator carefully tracks alumni through LinkedIn and also periodically reaches out through email An alumni event/reunion could be very beneficial for re-­‐establishing Follow up at 18-­‐month report Agenda Item IX
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The timing of co-­‐op placements may need to be reviewed Common Feedback across all programs Student opinions of the GEN TECH courses might be increased if formal recognition were feasible Improved services for students in their co-­‐op and career related activities is needed, along with a reassessment of the current co-­‐
op program connections with former students This was a workshop topic at our recent departmental retreat and the outcome was to leave the structure of the program as is All student snow receive a Business Management Certificate from Mohawk College at graduation In addition, the Management curriculum was accredited in September 2014 by the Canadian Institute of Management. This accreditation recognizes the academic requirements for the Certified in Management (C.I.M.) and Professional Manager (P.Mgr.) designations for all 4 year program graduates. The graduates will also need to demonstrate the appropriate level of managerial experience and submit the appropriate dossiers to the Canadian Institute of Management National Office for assessment. We agree and are working towards improving the number of job postings and preparedness of our students (for example creating marketing materials for students to bring to interviews) We are establishing a central “drop-­‐
in centre” that can be utilized by ECCS to make better connections with students A student mentorship program is being developed which would involve upper year students acting in an advisory/counseling capacity to students who are just beginning their job search We have hired a graphic design firm Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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to create marketing materials to aid students in representing themselves, their skill sets and the program Faculty continuity is a major issue 4 new faculty members have been that must be resolved hired and one Mohawk faculty has been taken on full-­‐time as of Fall 2014 A number of teaching track positions have been established for the School of Engineering Technology. Two positions are currently posted and hiring for these positions will continue on an ongoing basis over a number of years The BIO team noted that in light The Faculty believes that the of the 2012 instructor survey governance is more than adequate feedback indicating that faculty but will work with the Director, would like more involvement in Chairs and Mohawk College partners program decisions and direction, to develop a more robust process for it might be worthwhile to include obtaining feedback from more faculty on the Program stakeholders. Advisory Committee The GEN TECH team felt that an Industry Advisory Board (separate from the Program Advisory Committee) might help the School with continuous improvement, feedback, assistance in branding and promotion, etc. Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that the programs are functioning well and that there are no significant academic issues that are not being addressed. The QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review.
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review School of Engineering Technology Degree Completion Programs DCP Program Stream Date of Review Civil Engineering Infrastructure April 22 – 23, 2014 Technology (CIV TECH) Computing and Information April 21 – 22, 2014 Technology (COMP TECH) Energy Engineering Technologies March 27 – 28, 2014 (ENR TECH) Manufacturing Engineering April 3 – 4, 2014 Technology (MAN TECH) Management (GEN TECH) February 3 – 4, 2014 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the graduate programs delivered by the School of Engineering Technology. This report identifies the significant strengths of the programs, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out and prioritizes the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the Degree Completion Programs in the School of Engineering Technology In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the School of Engineering Technology submitted five separate self-­‐studies in January -­‐ March 2014 to the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty to initiate the cyclical program review of its undergraduate and graduate programs. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the School. Two arm’s length external reviewers and one internal reviewer for each program were endorsed by the Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, and selected by the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty. The review teams reviewed the self-­‐study documentation and then conducted site visits to McMaster University between February – April, 2014. The visits included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty, Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, Director of the School of Engineering Technology, chairs of each of the program streams and meetings with groups of current Agenda Item IX
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and former undergraduate students, full-­‐time faculty and support staff. The reviewers also had the opportunity to tour the School of Engineering Technology. The Director of the School of Engineering Technology and the Program Chairs submitted a joint response to the Reviewers’ Report in July 2014. The Associate Dean Academic submitted a response on behalf of the Faculty of Engineering in December 2014. Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that the programs are functioning well and that there are no significant academic issues that are not being addressed. The QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC to be submitted to Undergraduate Council and Senate (February 2014). In their reports, the Review Teams provided feedback that describes how the degree completion programs in the School of Engineering Technology meet the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and are consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. Executive summaries for each of the stream reviews are below. DCP Stream Executive Summary CIV TECH The B.Tech. in Civil Engineering Infrastructure Technology is a niche program providing a high value added to Society by teaching technical and business skills to students who had previously completed college diplomas in civil engineering, architecture or construction management. Some students completing the B.Tech. have gone on to pursue graduate school; some are pursuing licensure as professional engineers (P.Eng.); others are going on to technical careers in the civil engineering domain. The program was initially conceived to serve the Infrastructure Repair and Rehabilitation market, although the extent to which it is doing so is unclear. Enrollment in the program has more than doubled since 2008/09. Satisfaction with the program amongst alumni is 64% (based on a small sample), which is low compared to the three other degree completion programs. This possibly relates to the key issue for the program concerning the pathway of graduates to potential P.Eng. licensure. A high proportion of students taking the program see it as a route to P.Eng. licensure, although many may not have the abilities to become professional engineers. Professional Engineers Ontario is asking graduates of the program to take an average of seven qualifying exams (with high variation) towards the P.Eng. Proposed curriculum changes will likely reduce the number of qualifying exams, but the Program Director and steering committee should wrestle further with the alignment between student expectations and the pathway to P.Eng. While sessional instructors from industry greatly contribute to the B.Tech. program, the quality, reputation and consistency of course offerings may be improved if a further permanent instructor taught in the program. Further suggested enhancements to the program include long term scheduling of courses, orientation and networking sessions for instructors, and improved access to campus facilities during evenings. Agenda Item IX
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COMP TECH ENR TECH MAN TECH The program is attractive for college students wishing to complete their studies and obtain a degree. It offers students learning opportunities in several areas closely related to software technology, as well as General Technology courses that students seem to like. One weak feature of the program is that it relies heavily on sessional instructors, however the two sessional instructors the reviewers had a chance to meet have been teaching in the program for several years and they seem to be committed and serious about their work. The program is being redesigned to focus on software engineering and technology; however, the students seemed to be concerned about the new focus – that it is going to be harder. The program should maintain its focus on market-­‐ready graduates and shouldn’t attempt to compete with B.Eng. programs. In an effort to increase enrollment and make the program accessible to students beyond the GTA, parts (or all) of the program may be offered completely online. It is suggested that the roll-­‐out of online courses be completed in phases. The process for making changes to the program curriculum needs to be strengthened, and for this we recommend that a program curriculum committee be established with members from related departments at McMaster, such as the Department of Computing and Software. Overall the program is successful, bridging the gap between a technical college education and a university engineering education. The program also provides opportunities for further education and thus career enhancement to full-­‐time working students. The DCP energy stream benefits from high quality curriculum, labs and instructors. The reviewers found the program consistent with the university mission and academic plan. Courses are structured, taught and examined to meet degree level expectations. Several students also benefit from extracurricular opportunities provided through research projects and working in the labs to acquire further skills and develop lifelong learning skills. The program will significantly benefit by hiring another full-­‐time instructor to ensure the sustainability of the program and implement the proposed program enhancements. As per the reviewers’ own experience, the program will also significantly benefit from CEAB accreditation, and the program seems adequate, with some of the enhancements proposed here, to be accredited. McMaster is known for its strength in research and for its strong linkages with industry. The B.Tech. DCP program aligns well with the tradition. The B.Tech. DCP program in Manufacturing is oriented towards students who have already graduated with a college diploma and now wish to upgrade to a university degree with the ultimate aim of becoming a licensed Professional Engineer (P.Eng.). The program format allows it to be taken on a part-­‐time or full time basis, with the choice being left up to the student. Many students use this flexibility to hold full time or part-­‐time jobs as they take this program; adding a maturity to the program. The program holds evening classes to accommodate working students. To meet these requirements this particular program is taught by sessional and/or Teaching Stream instructors. Agenda Item IX
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The McMaster Manufacturing B.Tech. Degree Completion Program was designed to fulfill a niche college to university mobility need and is well placed to service it. The program is small both in terms of faculty numbers and the number of students it enrolls, but this size is central to the program character. The program is performing well. It is well on its way with OBA implementation. It has engaged faculty that is using innovative methods for teaching. The student attrition rates are normal. Student performance in PEO exams is good. Students like the program, faculty and the prospect of jobs, but are concerned about not being at par with students in the B.A.Sc. stream. The admission requirements into the program are adequate as the alumni are successfully pursuing careers in research and in industry. The Ontario colleges are the main source of students coming into the program. As the colleges offer degree granting programs the source of students may be affected or the quality of students may go down. The program is able to attract students with minimal advertisement, but is missing out on a richer source of good students from other provinces and countries. The current program curriculum has input from both industry and PEO. Upon graduation, the graduates are pursuing careers in industry and in research. In spite of the above, the students and faculty both felt that the curriculum needs an extra course in mathematics (section 10e). The program faculty is enthusiastic, motivated, uses innovative methods in teaching and is well connected with the students. This engagement has resulted in overwork and over commitment and is a point of concern. A formula for faculty task allotment that recognizes their contribution in and out of class is recommended (see section 10a). The program does not lack space but did not have dedicated labs or equipment. Some dedicated program based space is a must. The leadership of the program is collegial, helpful but firm. The chair has cultivated a family like atmosphere within the faculty. The chair is inspiring, helpful and firmly believes in student success. Faculty members and students alike respect the chair and acknowledge efforts in furthering the program objectives. The students speak highly of the program as it enables them to pursue the dream of becoming an engineer while maintaining full time jobs and offers prospects of careers in industry and research. Course scheduling is a point of concern (section 4 and section 10b). The frequency and variety of course offering must be improved. The main goal of the students is PEO licensure; the program leaves them just short of the goal. (They need at least six (6) PEO exams to become eligible for licensure.) See Section 10c and 10d for further recommendations. The relationship between students and faculty is exemplary and is under threat as the faculty is overworked. Two additional faculty members would ease the current load of the faculty and ensure student-­‐faculty relationship remains exemplary. Agenda Item IX
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GEN TECH The B.Tech. program, and specifically the GenTech management courses reviewed here, are well positioned to bring career enhancing value to students within the mission of McMaster University. The review team was impressed by the commitment of faculty and the chair and with the success of students completing the program. Quality assessment and evaluation programs are in place and working; many courses were highly valued by students. While the program is fundamentally strong, there were areas identified for improvement. It is suggested that GenTech core management courses be rationalized and coordinated to avoid duplication and also consider adding topics. The reviewers believe it would be highly valuable to pursue a formal mapping process of the curriculum content and the order in which it should be presented. Modest suggestions were made related to the managing of group projects, improved student services during the 4:30 to 6 p.m. time period and the need for formal faculty meetings. The use of 100% sessional faculty and a part-­‐time chair raises sustainability issues. Person-­‐to-­‐
person classroom contact and active learning seem particularly important to the students and faculty in this program; it does not seem that an on-­‐line or MOOC format would be well received. The following program strengths and weaknesses were noted: Strengths ! CIV TECH: The program has been growing in numbers. Its combination of technical and management courses produces graduates who are highly attractive for employers. The curriculum reflects the current state of the discipline and is both innovative and creative. ! COMP TECH: The program fills a real societal need in providing a pathway for individuals with a three-­‐year technology diploma to upgrade and enhance their skills by earning a four-­‐year equivalent university degree. While providing the required upgrading in fundamentals, the program also offers courses that provide career relevant technical expertise and a substantial management component. Students appreciate the dedication of their instructors and the quality and relevance of the course material. ! ENR TECH: The program is specifically designed to provide well-­‐trained technical staff to the power engineering industry, and has been generally successful in doing so. Labs are well equipped and relevant. The teaching staff is made up of experts, highly experienced in their subjects, and their work is greatly appreciated by students and alumni. ! MAN TECH: The program is small, but this size is central to its character. The program is well in tune with industry needs, addressing its demand for engineers trained with basic management skills. Students are positive about their courses, and the prevailing ethos is collegial. ! GEN TECH: The program is seen as fundamentally strong, its teaching quality high. Students express respect and admiration for the faculty’s experience, dedication, and career mentoring. Weaknesses The major concern raised by the reviewers of these programs is common to all of them: excessive dependence on sessional lecturers and on part-­‐time or contractually limited administrators. Though their competence is not in question, the stability of the programs is deemed to require the hiring of full-­‐
Agenda Item IX
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time faculty. Responses to the reviews indicate that hirings will be made as warranted. The advisability of moving increasingly to online course delivery is also a matter of debate. Both these situations merit careful monitoring. The Dean of the Faculty of Engineering, in consultation with the Director of the School of Engineering Technology and the chairs of the programs shall be responsible for monitoring the recommendations implementation plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐month Follow Up Report and filed in the Office of the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the School’s and the Faculty’s Responses Recommendations DCP Review Team Recommendations Program Chair and Faculty’s Timeline Stream Response CIV TECH Concern that program may not be The program chair will seek input Update at 18-­‐
fulfilling intended niche in and advice from the program month follow infrastructure rehabilitation and advisory committee regarding the up repair program focus/niche Planned curriculum changes were Will proceed with planned Update at 18-­‐
endorsed curriculum changes, which include month follow Foundation in statics and the addition of a Statics and up mechanics needs to be Dynamics course as a foundation-­‐
strengthened level course, as well as Probability Sustainability should be made a and Statistics and Structure and strong component of new Properties of Materials capstone course – CIV TECH 4ED3 A sustainability component will be added to CIV TECH 4ED3 for its first offering Students sometimes struggle with Continue to seek the ‘optimum level’ Update at 18-­‐
courses taught in the same of course delivery for CIV TECH month follow manner as that of the B.Eng. students and communicate this to up program instructors This will be done using ongoing meetings and discussions with instructors Lack of female instruction is a -­‐An additional female faculty Update at 18-­‐
concern member has been hired to teach a month follow course this fall up Within the last several years, the Student surveys indicate that speed of communication has “timely communication with increased (with positive student students” as well as comments) and faculty/student approachability/relationship with relations are improving as a result of instructors could be improved faculty changes The idea of adding another full-­‐time Low satisfaction rates in surveys faculty member will be discussed Agenda Item IX
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COMP TECH could be linked to lack of full-­‐time Another option might be to ‘share’ a faculty for instruction full-­‐time faculty with another stream (e.g. Manufacturing) -­‐ The Faculty will work with the program to increase the number of female instructors and students Course schedule should be made A draft course schedule for the next 3 – 5 years in advance to assist three years (pending curriculum students with planning changes) will be put together for CIV TECH stream needs to student reference “decide” on extent to which Proposed 2015 curriculum changes program should be will be pursued with the hopes of communicated/marketed as a obtaining a full program review by pathway to P.Eng. There is a the PEO within 2 years of the start of disconnect between those who the new curriculum want to pursue their license This should reduce the number of (90%+) and the percentage of PEO exams required after graduation students that instructors feel are to 4 capable of pursing their license This course of action assumes that (ranging from 0 – 60% in only the stronger students will take interviews with faculty) the steps necessary to pursue their license Objectives of the program are The program was never intended to vague – is it to produce software have a networking focus development professionals or The reorganization of the curriculum networking technologists? This is intended to increase the focus on needs to be clarified and software communicated to students Program marketing materials are being reevaluated to ensure that they accurately reflect the curriculum Process for curriculum Curriculum changes have been made development should be more using internal peer-­‐review and consultative at a broader level to extensive review of external industry help evolve and focus the reports program One such report was the ICTC (Information and Communications Technology Council of Canada) report on competencies in the Computing and Information sector CEAB requirements have also been taken into consideration when making curriculum changes A program advisory committee Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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ENR TECH consisting of faculty at Mohawk College, McMaster University and industry representatives will be established There appears to be no process The mapping process implemented for mapping across the program – as part of this review will be is there a system for tracking continued and expanded over the achievement per student? How is coming years to address these data used to make concerns improvements? Recommend an applied focus be Program has always had an applied taken to prepare students for focus jobs and not compete with All courses have a project Software Engineering programs component and the new Senior Course prerequisites are neither Engineering Project course will clear nor enforced. The order of centre entirely on practical courses is not clear -­‐ program application map is required. Attracts students who have already completed an advanced diploma and is not accredited; therefore, it is not a directly competitive program with Software Engineering The academic calendar acts as a student’s official program map For students who are part-­‐way through the old and new program, things become much more complicated and case specific Students should seek help from the B.Tech. Academic Advisor Learning outcomes of the We have identified that more program should be clearly communication needs to be articulated and communicated, provided from administration about especially to existing students the program in general, rather than just registration minutiae As a result, we have classroom visits planned to help increase transparency surrounding the rationale for program changes and goals Program seems too focused on This is an excellent suggestion that training power engineers for can be implemented in the Update at 18-­‐ month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐ month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow Agenda Item IX
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large generation and transmission utilities and operators, rather than local distribution companies The only review team to strongly encourage CEAB accreditation Recommendation made to replace fluids with one additional math course Replace one of the three mechanical courses with a more advanced math course Improve the accuracy of the course outlines. For instance, (1) modify course titles to accurately reflect the content of the course (“Power Quality and Energy Management” should be renamed “Power Quality”); (2) The course “Control Theories and Drive Systems” should be simply “Control Theories” and should relate to control with a power systems perspective; (3) The course “Industrial Electronics” should be “Power Electronics”, again with a power systems Continue to review technical courses and evaluation instruments upcoming years, pending enrolment growth and our ability to offer elective courses up Although this is a valuable Update at 18-­‐
suggestion, at the moment month follow accreditation is not being sought for up a number of reasons These include, but are not limited to, flexibility in upgrading course materials, introducing new courses as per industry demand and upgrading technical topics in a very short period of time Doing this would mean that the mechanical courses will not be synchronized with expected learning outcomes Replacing a mechanical course would go against the recommendations of the experts involved in the program design The combination of the three mechanical courses is seen as critical for other advanced courses, specifically related to power generation Both suggested recommendations (Power Quality and Control Theories) are valid and will be implemented The third suggestion (changing the title “Industrial Electronics” to “Power Electronics” cannot be applied as the main goal of this course is to cover power electronics from an industrial perspective -­‐This is an excellent suggestion which falls within B.Tech program mandate through the continuous review of their POS -­‐ As well, this suggestion aligns with the B.Tech vision of including industry advisory committee feedback and recommendations Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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MAN TECH with the aim of improving and upgrading the POS Program would benefit from Action is in process, as current greater linkage with the Electrical B.Tech students utilize the ECE Power courses offered in the department lab facilities in their Electrical and Computer courses (ENRTECH 3IE3, ENRTECH Engineering (ECE) Department at 3EP3) McMaster (and vice versa for the -­‐ Further, there has been some McMaster courses). collaborative efforts between B.Tech and ECE to have a two courses (ENRTECH 4PM3, ENRTECH 4PP3) from the B.Tech program to be cross-­‐listed with ECE as elective courses -­‐ It should be mentioned that a few years ago the course ENRTECH 4PM3 was cross-­‐listed and taken by ECE students as a fourth year elective. The feedback from the students was positive, and requested similar course delivery in the future Offer official recognition such as a A Business Management Certificate “management” certificate or from Mohawk will be provided to diploma option to the DCP our graduates in the near future students to further appreciate the significance of the courses Additional mathematics courses An advanced mathematics course is could be added to better prepare being planned for fall 2015. This students for foundational courses course will replace CIV TECH 3MN3 – Numerical Solutions in Engineering Full-­‐time faculty appear to be Additional full-­‐time faculty members overloaded/overworked with too will be hired (if justified) over the little time for professional coming years to reduce sessional development hiring and decrease full-­‐time faculty May need to increase appeal of workloads program to compete with college One option to increase our degree program offerings competitive advantage is to create a pathway for B.Tech. students with a 9.5 GPA or higher to have direct entry into the M.Eng. Manufacturing degree If the institutional goals permit, The possibility of the MAN TECH CEAB accreditation could be program being accredited is Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow Agenda Item IX
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considered. Addition of a report writing course or co-­‐op report to fulfill PEO requirements could be helpful GEN TECH dependent on the market demand and also on the effect of colleges offering accredited degrees Will discuss the possibility of writing a final co-­‐op work term report to fulfill PEO technical report requirements The diversity of the program GEN TECH curriculum is consistently streams may require a closer look reviewed to ensure relevance. at the GEN TECH content to Course content is designed for all ensure that needs are being four audiences addressed As much as possible, topics are chosen to appeal to the widest audience, or to allow students choice/specialization Project management has been the most difficult course to administer across all streams in terms of content/relevancy. An instructor change has improved the situation and course evaluations have become more positive Students should be provided with a recommended order to take courses (i.e. a program map) The GEN TECH courses were designed without course pre-­‐
The selection of the five required requisites to provide students with courses appears haphazard flexibility and minimal barriers to completing the program as quickly There does not appear to be a as possible. A recommended order capstone project/course to tie will be provided. the material together Topics in Business Strategy and Entrepreneurship should be GEN TECH courses were designed to strengthened represent the “best of an MBA” and were very intentionally selected by the development committee in 2007 Strategy Formulation was originally a required course. It is now elective, but retains its capstone orientation Entrepreneurship has always been a required course Supply chain management topics This could be added as an elective in should be added the future, but has not been identified as a priority by past Program Advisory Committees up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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Engineering Economics and Sustainability are important topics, but should not crowd out teaching fundaments of management Decision to make Engineering Economics a mandatory course is intended to help make the pathway to P.Eng. licensing smoother (i.e. by eliminating a technical exam requirement) Sustainability is going to be offered as an elective course beginning in fall 2014 Courses with more than 35 Class sizes will be managed to students reduce opportunities for optimize the opportunities for interactivity and impact interactivity. Teaching assistants will effectiveness of teaching and be provided to improve learning in assessment larger classes. Student and alumni surveys Graduates perceive the value of such reveal very mixed reviews courses while current students, less regarding the perceived so usefulness of GEN TECH courses More mature and older current students acknowledge the value of management courses The split in attitude may divide along the line of chronological age/experience rather than current students versus alumni Graduates come to realize that their jobs have them leaving behind technical skills in favour of management skills Lean program operating structure The Chair’s role will be re-­‐evaluated with a part-­‐time Program Chair is as duties increase and delivery not ideal moves online -­‐The use of sessional faculty provides flexibility and industry specialization which is essential to the program Consider peer review of group Some faculty, as a matter of projects practice, do partition out individual contributions within group projects to recognize individual effort This could be a discussion topic at the next faculty meeting Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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Common Feedback across all programs Orientation handbook should be made available to sessional faculty members A handbook is currently under development and will be available beginning Fall 2014 A potential orientation session is under discussion; however, there are issues related to availability of instructors Mixed feelings across the reviews COM TECH and GEN TECH are in regards to online learning transitioning to full online delivery in formats Fall 2014 A learning on demand environment with fewer face to face lectures is being explored for ENG TECH 3MA3 – Mathematics V The Faculty supports the approach being taken by the program; staged introduction of high quality online delivery accompanied by careful monitoring of the outcomes Additional instructor space could Beginning in Fall 2014, DCP sessional alleviate issues related to lack of instructors will have access to a access to resources common sessional office space (equipped with computers and networked to the printer/photocopier) They will also have access to the common mail room, rather than being restricted to accessing their mail box only when the evening receptionist is on duty (1.5 hrs per day) Additional student space could Student drop-­‐in help centre is being improve feeling of community created in a central location that can also potentially be used by student groups wishing to meet to discuss projects Students already have access to empty classrooms prior to their classes, in addition to private study rooms for B.Tech. students only More/better communication to PEO information session is being students about pathway to planned for Fall 2014 obtaining P.Eng. and Grad Studies Ensure that graduate studies pathways document on website is updated with listings of known Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Agenda Item IX
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More access to administration and student services after office hours Lack of full-­‐time faculty, overloaded/overworked full-­‐time faculty, need to hire more CLAs and less sessionals alumni who have moved on to Master’s and Ph.D. programs a part-­‐time receptionist is available from 5:30 am – 7:00 am Monday through Friday and from 8:30 am – 10:00 am on Saturdays. Considerations could be made for increasing these hours for more administrative support B.Tech has historically maintained a minimal presence of full-­‐time faculty for degree completion programs. One of the primary reasons for this is to ensure that instructors bring industry relevant material to the classroom Plans are in place to expand the contingent of full-­‐time faculty in all B.Tech programs, pending enrolment growth. The Faculty will support the program in offering effective support services to DCP students Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Update at 18-­‐
month follow up Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that the programs are functioning well and that there are no significant academic issues that are not being addressed. The QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review.
Agenda Item IX
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review Classics Program Date of Review: March 4 -­‐ 5, 2014 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the undergraduate Classics program. This report identifies the significant strengths of the program, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the Classics Program In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the Classics department submitted a self-­‐study in March 2014 to the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty to initiate the cyclical program review of its undergraduate program. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the Department. Two arms-­‐length reviewers, one from Ontario and one from British Columbia, and one internal reviewer, selected from a set of proposed reviewers, examined the materials and completed a site visit on March 4 -­‐ 5, 2014. The visit included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President (Faculty); Acting Dean of Humanities; Chair of the program and meetings with a group of current students, full-­‐time faculty and support staff. The Chair of the Classics Program and the Dean of Humanities submitted responses to the Reviewers’ Report (July 2014). Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that since the significant problems that need addressing relate to faculty complement, and since the department is otherwise praised for delivering solid training for its students, QAC recommends that the program follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC to be submitted to Undergraduate Council and Senate (February 2014). Agenda Item IX
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In their report (May 2014), the Review Team provided feedback that describes how the Arts and Science Program meet the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and are consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. The Review Team found the Classics undergraduate programs to be very strong, offering students a good basic training in the many varied aspects of the discipline and enhancing key critical skills in reading, writing and oral expression. The Department is very well administered and continues to show itself a good citizen of the Faculty and University by offering a good number of seats each year for students from programs in other Departments and other Faculties. A number of the Classics faculty have started to integrate new teaching techniques and technologies into their courses, and especially in the upper levels their courses are often linked to their current research interests. The Review Team offered a number of recommendations in the hope that they will help the Department devise and implement strategies to strengthen an already impressively strong program. The following program strengths and weaknesses were noted: Strengths ! The department was commended in the report in the report for its strong departmental culture; for the way its curriculum reflects the current state of the discipline, covering all four of the major areas of Classics scholarship; for the active engagement in scholarship of its members; for the way the faculty integrate their research with their teaching; and for the number of students it has attracted relative to Departments of Classics elsewhere in Canada. Weaknesses ! The primary concern pertains to the literary stream in the department’s offerings, a stream weakened by the failure of an appointment in this area to gain tenure, and likely to be exacerbated with the retirement within the next few years of another member. The Chair of the Classics Department submitted a response to the Reviewers’ Report (July 2014). The Dean, Faculty of Humanities submitted his response to the Reviewers’ Report and the Program’s Response in July 2014. Specific recommendations were discussed, along with follow-­‐up actions to aid in addressing the recommendations. The Dean, Faculty of Humanities in consultation with the Department Chair shall be responsible for monitoring the recommendation implementation plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐month Follow-­‐up Report and filed in the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty’s Office. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the Program’s and Dean of Humanities’ Responses Recommendations 1. Consider expanding the literary offerings and think carefully about the subject matter of the curricular offerings in the literary stream. At the same time, the review recommends that the Department rethink modestly the traditional subject streams to allow more interdisciplinary courses at Levels 3 and 4 of the curriculum. Agenda Item IX
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Response: The Department notes that some of the reviewers concerns can be addressed by clarifying course titles and descriptions, as suggested. The Dean recommended that as new appointments are not likely in the short term, the Department may need to review its subfield categories. The Dean suggested that the Department might consider whether of how it can manage the literary stream with the current complement, and also whether, given some of the courses currently included in this stream, the Department might rename or reframe it. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair and Dean, Faculty of Humanities Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 2. Improve the specificity of course titles to better represent the content of courses. Response: The department acknowledged that this could be an incremental improvement and will discuss the possibility during the next curriculum round. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 3. The Faculty of Humanities maintain TA funding at its current levels to the extent possible. Response: The Dean advised the Faculty intends to continue supporting BIU-­‐funded MA and PhD graduate students with TAships and that the support will continue so long as the Classics Department maintains or increases its graduate enrolments. Responsibility for Following Up: Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 4. Recommend a faculty complement of at least nine, replacement of position in Greek literature currently vacant, and replacement of position in Latin literature given impending retirement. Response: The Dean’s Office will be happy to work with the Chair on complement planning. In considering the appropriate size of the department, attention must be given to undergraduate and graduate enrolments, as well as the service teaching within and outside Humanities. The Faculty of Humanities has never automatically replaced any vacancy in a department (and here we differ from some other universities), and must consider the overall needs of the Faculty in allocating positions. We need to ensure that appointments match demand and Faculty priorities. Responsibility for Following Up: Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 5. Review various aspects of the program’s curriculum, including the role of prerequisites in the Art History and Archaeology courses, and the titles of lower and subject matter of some Ancient History courses. Response: The Dean noted that the Faculty would encourage the Department to review its curriculum, to ensure that its courses are attractive. The Dean acknowledged that the Department already has responded to the incentives provided in the new budget model for teaching, and has made important revisions to make its courses more attractive. The result has been a significant increase in undergraduate units taught in the Department and the Dean noted that the Department clearly sees the value of continuing in this direction. Responsibility for Following Up: Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report Agenda Item IX
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6. Ensure a sufficient variety of courses for students to meet their Level III and IV requirements, and ensure that students have access to Ancient Philosophy courses. Response: The Dean advised that the Faculty will continue to work with the Department on course management issues and he acknowledged that the Department’s suggestion that it reduce its Level III and IV requirements and review prerequisites in those courses are good ones. Through the course management process, the Faculty will also encourage the Departments of Classics and Philosophy to cooperate in the offering of courses, while recognizing that there are limits to preventing timetabling conflicts given broader scheduling challenges at the University. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair and Dean, Faculty of Humanities Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 7. Consider ways of sustaining the offering of language courses in the summer term. Response: The Dean recognized the importance of the courses and the challenges this and other departments face at all times in offering language courses. The Dean commended the Department for its current approach to this challenge. 8. Work with Anthropology on cross-­‐listing Archaeology courses. Response: The Dean highlighted that the Faculty will encourage such discussions, especially because the new budget model provides greater transparency in the costs and benefits of cooperation between Faculties in the offering of courses. Responsibility for Following Up: Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report 8. Consider integrating tutorials into Classics 1A03, Introduction to Classical Archaeology. Response: The Department noted that it would discuss this recommendation; however, it also noted that it lacks the graduate cohort to do so. The Dean acknowledged that the Faculty is encouraging all departments to review the ways in which large classes are offered. 9. Make better use of online resources for grade and class management, and consider courses for online and blended learning. Response: The Dean noted that the Department already has volunteered one introductory Ancient History course for online development, makes use of electronic resources in the teaching of Latin, and is considering other courses for potential online or blended development. Responsibility for Following Up: Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that since the significant problems that need addressing relate to faculty complement, and since the department is otherwise praised for delivering solid training for its students, QAC recommends that the program follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. Agenda Item IX
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review Health, Aging and Society (BA & MA Programs) Date of Review: June 17 – 19, 2014 In accordance with McMaster’s Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the Health, Aging and Society (Undergraduate & Graduate) BA and MA Program. This report identifies the significant strengths of the program, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out and prioritizes the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. This Final Assessment Report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible leading the follow up for the proposed recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Health, Aging and Society (Undergraduate & Graduate) Cyclical Program Review The Health, Aging and Society Program operates through an interdisciplinary approach throughout its curriculum at both undergraduate and graduate levels. In accordance with the IQAP, the undergraduate and graduate programs submitted a joint self-­‐study in February 2014. The self-­‐study presented the program descriptions and learning outcomes, an analytical assessment of the program, including data collected from students along with the standard data package prepared by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appended were the course outlines for all courses in the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time faculty member in the Program. Two arm’s-­‐length reviewers, one from Ontario and one from California, and one internal reviewer participated in a three-­‐day site visit organized by the School of Graduate Studies. The site visit consisted of meetings with faculty members, staff, as well as undergraduate and graduate students. The Review Team highlighted their findings in a report submitted in June 2014. The Review Team was genuinely impressed with the organization of the undergraduate program and the positive feedback received from students when discussing the program, faculty and staff. The only question that remains is about the viability of the three-­‐year BA program given the university’s focus on graduate student education. Overall, the review highlighted a very positive student experience and no other recommendations were put forth. The MA program in Health, Aging and Society is represented by students with very different disciplinary backgrounds. Although the Review Team does agree that this is the basis for a rich graduate student experience they do note the challenges the program faces in ensuring the course content meets all students’ needs and that students are provided with the appropriate level of direction in their present and anticipated careers. Agenda Item IX
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The Chair of the Health, Aging and Society program and the Acting Dean of Social Science submitted responses to the Reviewers’ Report. Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that reviewers’ comments and feedback were generally positive. QAC recommends that the program follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow-­‐up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the next review. The following program strengths and weakness were also noted: • Strengths The review team noted that the Health, Aging and Society faculty have developed an innovative undergraduate curriculum with a strong experiential component The students in the undergraduate program have a close sense of community leading to a very positive student experience. • Weaknesses There is a heavy reliance on cross-­‐appointed faculty. Although having cross-­‐appointed faculty allows a diverse educational experience for both BA and MA students, this model is also associated with competing demands from other departments in the Faculty. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the Department’s and Acting Dean’s Responses & Follow Up Process Recommendation #1: Eliminate the three-­‐year BA program. Response: The Department expresses an interest in moving to an exclusively honors BA program or to direct entry degree programs. Responsibility for following up: Department Chair and Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #2: Uneven interest in gerontology and health studies. Response: The Department places an equal emphasis on both areas but attracting students into gerontology continues to pose challenges. Department can encourage students to take a combined honors degree. Responsibility for following up: Department Chair Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #3: Address the diversity of student backgrounds in the MA program. Response: The Department agrees with the Reviews’ assessment and believes that the introduction of two PhD programs and new faculty with this degree may allow the Department to offer a greater range of courses that will meet the diverse needs to students. The Department has also conducted a labour market assessment, which will allow them guide students in careers relating to their degrees Responsibility for following up: Department Chair & Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Agenda Item IX
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Recommendation #4: Graduate students should have access to a greater number of courses in their areas of interest. Response: The Department fully agrees and will begin to address this topic at the faculty retreat. They point out that the new PhD program will also make this a more viable option. The Acting Dean adds that the Chairs and Directors in the Faculty of Social Sciences are discussing how to facilitate students who wish to register in courses in other departments. The Department is also speaking with units outside of the Faculty of Social Sciences to explore joint graduate courses. Responsibility for following up: Department Chair & Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that reviewers’ comments and feedback were generally positive. QAC recommends that the program follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow-­‐up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the next review. Agenda Item IX
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review School of Nursing (B.ScN, MN, PhD) Date of Review: April 2 – 3, 2014 In accordance with McMaster’s Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the School of Nursing (B.ScN, PhD) Programs. This report identifies the significant strengths of the program, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out and prioritizes the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. This Final Assessment Report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible leading the follow up for the proposed recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the School of Nursing (B.ScN, MN, PhD) Cyclical Program Review The McMaster School of Nursing (B.ScN, MN, PhD) Program is recognized by other Canadian Schools/Faculties of Nursing for leadership in undergraduate and graduate nursing education and the high caliber and output of nursing research. In accordance with the IQAP, the program submitted two individual reports: an undergraduate and a graduate self-­‐study. The self-­‐study presented the program descriptions and learning outcomes, an analytical assessment of the program, including data collected from students along with the standard data package prepared by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appended were the course outlines for all courses in the program and the CVs for each full-­‐
time faculty member in the Program. Two arm’s-­‐length reviewers, one from Ontario and one from Newfoundland, and one internal reviewer participated in a two-­‐day site visit organized by the School of Graduate Studies in which they reviewed the undergraduate and graduate nursing programs jointly. The reviewers reported that the goals and priorities of the Nursing Programs at McMaster University are consistent with the University’s mission and academic plan. Specifically the University’s mission to “foster discovery, communication and preservation of knowledge through teaching, research and scholarship” is evident in the nursing program’s reputation for problem-­‐based learning and evidenced-­‐based practices. Administrators, faculty, and staff members within McMaster University School of Nursing voiced their commitment to the school, their students, and their work. Overall, undergraduate students, at all three collaborative sites (McMaster University, Mohawk College, and Conestoga College), were positive about the program and their instructors, as were graduate students at McMaster University. However, it was noted that there is minimal inter-­‐professional education within the program and given that McMaster University’s School of Nursing is within a Faculty of Health Sciences, there are opportunities to strengthen this. The faculty and nursing administrators from all three sites said they had an effective committee structure for working together to develop, manage, and implement the undergraduate curriculum. 49
Agenda Item IX
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The following program strengths and weakness were also noted: Strengths • The school has unique programs, including highly successful collaborations between McMaster, Mohawk and Conestoga, that are highly recognized by the reviewers and other Canadian schools alike • The programs have strong foundations based on problem-­‐based and evidence-­‐based learning • The innovative “Kaleidoscope” curriculum has met with success through the first cycle • Research is of high quality and is well recognized by the nursing community • Weaknesses •
The budget was identified as a key issue in the original report. This has largely been addressed in the follow-­‐up, but funding will likely remain a key issue in on-­‐going operations • Faculty complement is at some degree of risk; this needs to be monitored closely • The lack of extensive interprofessional education is identified as a key issue. Buy-­‐in by the entire faculty will be needed in order for efforts in this direction to be truly successful • The issue of common admission for Mohawk or Conestoga students is identified throughout the documents. Efforts to address this issue are on-­‐going, and will need the collaborative input of several units, including the registrar’s office Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the Department’s and Dean’s Responses & Follow Up Process Recommendation #1: Develop a staffing plan for tenure stream positions that includes the percentage of theory courses in the undergraduate and graduate programs that are taught by tenure stream faculty members, as well as graduate student (thesis and PhD) supervision. Response: During faculty career review meetings this spring the director of the School of Nursing determined an appropriate teaching load for all tenured faculty. This resulted in a minimal increase in teaching in the undergraduate nursing program. This will be an ongoing initiative for the School. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #2: Evaluate work processes and workload of staff members to rationalize all positions. Response: A proposed plan has been developed to enhance support provided to faculty with a reduced staff complement. This has yet to be implemented. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #3: Clarify role of Assistant Dean of Research at McMaster University’s School of Nursing and how this role can best be used to meet research needs of beginning and midcareer faculty members. 50
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Response: The terms of reference and function of this role will be evaluated and reassessed by the new Director of the School of Nursing. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #4: Senior faculty members have just retired or are about to retire, reducing the expertise within the faculty to mentor new faculty members and supervise graduate students. Response: The program agrees but has taken steps to try and address this concern. The program highlights the fact that there are mid-­‐career researchers who are able to supervise students. SON has recommended three junior faculty for appointment in the graduate program to try and increase the numbers available to thesis committees. A large group of qualified and experienced ‘clinical’ faculty (adjunct) also serve as guest lecturers, on thesis committees, and as external examiners for masters and PhD students’ oral defense sessions, scholarly paper reviews, or comprehensive examinations. While not included in the full-­‐ and part-­‐time faculty numbers, the program states that these professionals enhance the high level of academic resources for our students. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #5: Ensure stipends for PhD students especially if faculty members may not have a grant/have a grant under review. Response: Under the new budget model, the Nursing Graduate Program has the opportunity to access Scholarship Funding which will increase the direct support for students through entrance or departmental scholarships, and reduce the funding needed from faculty grant support. These measures will enhance the future recruitment of PhD students. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #6: Different streams are outlined in the calendar, however, courses related to these streams may not be offered because of low enrollment. Response: The six fields described relate to the research expertise within the graduate faculty. A review of the fields has been discussed with the Nursing Graduate Faculty and a retreat is planned for September 2014 to review and consider revising them to areas of research excellence. Program has also developed cross listings with HRM and RS. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #7: Increase simulation lab opportunities including time when the labs are available for students to practice outside of their allocated lab time at the McMaster University site. Response: There are plans to extend the stimulation lab for undergraduate students. Senior students have also been hired as peer students to provide support to students in CSBL. The use of standardized patients is being reviewed. The AVP, Academic agrees and states that faculty leadership will encourage the nursing undergraduate program to develop its curriculum for simulation learning to ensure that opportunities and experiences and use of simulation facilities are optimized. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #8: Students participate in clinical volunteer work in the community that is not supervised by clinical instructors during the first two years of the program. 51
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Response: The program clarifies that in the first two years, this is not a volunteer experience but rather a service learning opportunity. Although a tutor is not present with the students, the program clarifies that the placements are carefully selected to meet course objectives and placement contacts are aware of the students’ learning expectations. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #9: Need to have a common admissions process for undergraduate students at all three collaborative sites. Response: Program notes that the Mohawk College has made a formal request to have their applicants use the University application system. Conestoga College has indicated that they do not wish to use this system and wish to stay with OCAS. Mohawk and McMaster are currently working with the McMaster registrar’s office to move this forward process. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #10: Monitor CNRE (or NCLEX starting in 2015) pass rates to determine impact of strengthened pre-­‐health courses and common admission process. Response: Program concurs that careful review of the impact of changes will be important. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #11: Consider ways to improve cross institution transfer of information. Response: SON is awaiting the full roll-­‐out of MOSAIC prior to developing sustainable information transfer processes. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #12: Interprofessional education (IPE) is minimal in the undergraduate program and can be enhanced at all three sites. Response: The program concurs that this is an area that requires further development. Some steps that have already been taken to promote interprofessional education include: • Nursing faculty member is on the planning group for Program for Interprofessional Practice, Education and Research. • McMaster Interprofessional Student Collaborative (MISC) is a student-­‐initiated group created as part of PIPER. They host a facebook page and Blog and plan IP events throughout the year. • Curriculum mapping for IPE competencies was conducted in 2012, looking for opportunities to implement shared IPE experiences between all our health-­‐related programs. o i.e. “Crisis on the Ward” SIMulation event that involves all Level 4 students from Practical Nursing and BScN, Respiratory Therapy and Paramedic programs. The AVP, Academic agrees with this recommendation also and states that the Health Sciences Faculty leadership will work with the School and undergraduate nursing program to ensure there is a strong faculty lead for PIPER from the school to work on enhancing the IPE. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report 52
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Recommendation #13: Feedback from undergraduate students at the three sites. Response: Curriculum Quality Sustainability and Innovation Committee (CQSIC) reviews year end reports, which include student feedback and makes modifications to the expectations of individual courses as necessary. Faculty development offered throughout the year addresses issues of inconsistency among tutors. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #14: Consider supporting access to the McMaster library resources for students at Conestoga College and Mohawk College. Response: College site libraries were provided with funding to upgrade resources to University level when collaboration began. All college site students are registered as McMaster University students and have online access to McMaster University library resources. It is true however that they cannot access the librarians for support. Should all students enter through the University admissions process, this may change. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Recommendation #15: Consider bursaries for students who cannot afford to do an outpost or low income clinical experience in the 4th year of the course. Response: The program suggests they might work with the advancement office to establish an ongoing bursary/scholarship program to support the students for this experience. The AVP, Academic supports the program’s plan to work with advancement so students may pursue an outpost or international clinical experience. Responsibility for following up: Associate Dean Timeline: Update at 18 month report Quality Assurance Committee Recommendations The School of Nursing has high quality programs at both undergraduate and graduate levels which are admired by other Schools in Canada. It is clear that considerable effort has already been placed on addressing the issues arising from the review. The committee therefore recommends that the next IQAP review occur on the regular cycle, subject to a satisfactory follow-­‐up report after 18 months. 53
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review School of Geography and Earth Sciences Undergraduate and Graduate Programs Date of Review: March 3 -­‐5, 2014 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the undergraduate and graduate programs delivered by the School of Geography and Earth Sciences. This report identifies the significant strengths of the programs, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out and prioritizes the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the Programs in the School of Geography and Earth Sciences In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the School of Geography and Earth Sciences submitted a self-­‐study in January 2014 to the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty and the School of Graduate Studies to initiate the cyclical program review of its undergraduate and graduate programs. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the School. Two arm’s length external reviewers, both from Ontario and one internal reviewer were endorsed by the Dean of Science, and selected by the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty and Associate Vice-­‐President and Dean of Graduate Studies. The review team reviewed the self-­‐study documentation and then conducted a site visit to McMaster University on March 3 -­‐ 5, 2014. The visit included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐President and Dean of Graduate Studies; Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty, Associate Dean, Graduate Studies (Science), Director of the School and meetings with groups of current undergraduate, Ph.D. and MSc students, full-­‐time faculty and support staff. The Director, School of Geography and Earth Sciences and the Dean of Science submitted responses to the Reviewers’ Report (May/June 2014). Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee noted that it is great to read that several of the issues identified in the report have already been addressed. Budget issues are in a wait-­‐and-­‐see mode for the University’s new budget model; however, 54
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the School has successfully sought external support. Internal communication appears to be improving with more frequent faculty interaction being reported. It appears that the faculty teaching load assignments are under a wait-­‐and-­‐see mode, pending the outcome of an Academic Planning exercise. The QAC also noted that the issues of antirequisites is currently being resolved. The TA issue is one that all departments and schools struggle with across campus, and their Curriculum Committee is working on resolving this with TA schedules and specifying TA requirements. QAC recommends that the program should follow the regular course of action with an 18-­‐month follow-­‐
up report and a subsequent full external cyclical review to be conducted no later than 8 years after the start of the last review. The QAC recognized that the resolution of some issues and weaknesses in the department are dependent on greater clarity of direction from bodies outside the SGES. At the 18-­‐month review point, the committee hopes that these external directions are clear and that SGES would have already proceeded to implement concrete steps to resolve some of the issues, which are currently in suspended mode. The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC to be submitted to Undergraduate Council, Graduate Council and Senate (February 2014). In their report (March 2014), the Review Team provided feedback that describes how the graduate programs in the School of Rehabilitation Science meet the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and are consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. In their report, the Review Team members highlighted that the quality of the school’s faculty, staff, and graduate and undergraduate programs is exemplary and of very high quality. Overall, students expressed a high level of satisfaction with their learning experiences. Faculty and staff are highly committed to teaching and research. The reviewers noted that the key future challenge will be to maintain or minimize the erosion of the high standard of teaching and scholarship across the current breadth and depth of subject areas in the face of likely budget reductions. The following program strengths and weaknesses were noted: Strengths The following strengths were identified: an innovative high quality learning environment is evident in the report using, for example, the problem-­‐based learning approach. Related is the high level of student satisfaction, evident by student comments at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. The SGES is commended on going to great lengths to solicit student feedback. Of note as well, is the exemplary and high quality faculty in SGES. Weaknesses A key concern of the reviewers is the lack of specific details in fixing identified issues. For example, while there are mandatory field trips in the program, they appear to be insufficiently supported. Prior reviews identified rising costs and lack of spaces on these trips. Students have, apparently, been disappointed by not having appropriate field experience, and disadvantaged in terms of employment opportunities. The report indicates a co-­‐op or internship plan might help. It should be an urgent focus of the SGES to demonstrate how this lack of field experience is being addressed, whether through internships, or other means. Intermediate actions should perhaps be considered, while waiting for the 55
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formal process to implement a 2016/17 co-­‐op program. This school is favourable viewed by its students (both graduate and undergraduate) and hopefully this temporary issue can be resolved. In a similar vein, taking action on the lack of coherence and availability of graduate students’ course concerns should be addressed. Resolving this will be related to the issue of equitable spread of teaching load, which is pending the results of the Academic Plan. The Dean of the Faculty of Science, in consultation with the Director of the School of Geography and Earth Science shall be responsible for monitoring the recommendations implementation plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐month Follow Up Report and filed in the School of Graduate Studies and in the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty’s office. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the School’s and the Dean’s Responses Recommendations 1. Provide for more flexibility while maintaining fairness in the allocation of the teaching responsibilities for regular faculty. Response: The school advised that it would strike a committee to re-­‐examine the allocation of teaching loads within the School after the Dean’s Academic Plan has been released. This will allow the School to evaluate teaching duties within the context of the Faculty of Science Plan and the new budget realities. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of SGES Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report 2. Review the current Teaching Assistant allocation to ensure an appropriate balance between effectiveness and efficiency in program delivery is met. Response: Through the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, SGES will examine how it allocates TAs to courses, particularly given that the number of TA positions will remain fixed. TA guidelines will also be published so that both faculty and graduate students have a better understanding of how allocations are made. The Dean noted that the recent Academic Planning exercise also identified TA allocation as an issue that merits study. The Faculty will look to address this issue in future. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of SGES and Dean of Faculty of Science Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report 3. Introduce paid co-­‐ops and internships as part of the undergraduate programs. Response: In April 2014, SGES initiated discussions with the Faculty of Science’s Science Career and Cooperative Education (SCCE) Office regarding the possibility of paid co-­‐op opportunities, particularly with respect to earth and environmental students. SCCE will develop a prospectus on co-­‐op opportunities over the summer of 2014, which will be brought forward to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the SGES Faculty during the Fall of 2014. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of SGES Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 56
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4. Address budget constraints Response: SGES will work with the Dean’s office to implement plans, with the acknowledgement that the delivery of undergraduate and graduate programs, and the resources to do this, remain a priority. SGES will also proceed on its own in terms of addressing its budget issues. Beginning with the 2014/15 budget, the School has said that it will cut ‘discretionary’ spending by approximately 50%. SGES will also be looking carefully at teaching duties and the number/variety of courses taught. The Undergraduate Curriculum Committee will look at opportunities to teach courses in alternating years in order for faculty resources to teach other courses, and reduce the need to hire CLAs or sessional instructors to cover courses. SGES will also actively seek out other funding opportunities. This will include Research Chair opportunities and working with Alumni Advancement. The School is currently having discussions with program alumni to fund a seminar series and/or field courses. The Dean advised that one likely outcome of the Academic Planning process is the establishment of a Faculty-­‐wide minimum undergraduate teaching load. Also, the Academic Planning Committee will likely recommend units review the necessity of offering very low enrolment courses. Responsibility for following up: Director of SGES with Dean of Faculty of Science Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up 5. Establish appropriate anti-­‐requisites Response: The School noted that the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee would review anti-­‐
requisites as part of its yearly review of the undergraduate program. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of SGES along with the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up 6. Improving Internal Communication Response: SGES will continue discussions with faculty regarding budget issues throughout the year. Faculty groups in main areas in SGES will also be required to meet to work out teaching duties. More broadly, the School will explore ways to further improve internal communications within the School. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of SGES Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up 7. Offer a BA from the Faculty of Science Response: The School agreed that a funding agreement between the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Social Science is a priority. A substantial number of students originate from Social Sciences, while other students move from the B.Sc. in Environmental Science to the B.A. program in Environmental Studies. Many of the B.Sc. students participate in cross-­‐listed classes, including classes in the GIS stream, and therefore benefit from the interdisciplinary environment these classes offer. The Dean highlighted that a key issue going forward will be to address how the B.A. program can continue to operate within the constraints of the new budget model. Currently, the Faculty of Science delivers the majority of the teaching for this program but receives a relatively small proportion of the revenue. The Dean noted that the university’s documentation on the new budget model recognizes this is an area of concern and proposes the relevant Deans reach an agreement on an appropriate way to share revenues and costs. The Dean acknowledged that the reviewers identified housing the B.A. program within the Faculty of Science as another solution to this challenge. The Dean stressed that it is 57
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unclear which path will be followed; however it is a high priority issue for the Faculty of Science to address in the near future. Responsibility for Following Up: Dean, Faculty of Science Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 8. Ensure the best use of staff resources across the Department, Faculty and University. Response: The School noted that the SGES is stretched and noted that it would look for opportunities to integrate aspects of the School’s supports with the staff and services available at Faculty or McMaster levels. The School stressed that it was not aware of such opportunities at this time, but acknowledged that some may arise in the coming months with the Academic Plan. Responsibility for Following Up: Director, SGES Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report Quality Assurance Committee Recommendation McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee noted that it is great to read that several of the issues identified in the report have already been addressed. Budget issues are in a wait-­‐and-­‐see mode for the University’s new budget model; however, the School has successfully sought external support. Internal communication appears to be improving with more frequent faculty interaction being reported. It appears that the faculty teaching load assignments are under a wait-­‐and-­‐see mode, pending the outcome of an Academic Planning exercise. 58
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FINAL ASSESSMENT REPORT Institutional Quality Assurance Program (IQAP) Review Social Work (BSW, MSW and Ph.D.) Date of Review: April 7 -­‐ 8, 2014 In accordance with the University Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), this final assessment report provides a synthesis of the external evaluation and the internal response and assessments of the undergraduate and graduate Social Work programs delivered by the School of Social Work. This report identifies the significant strengths of the program, together with opportunities for program improvement and enhancement, and it sets out the recommendations that have been selected for implementation. The report includes an Implementation Plan that identifies who will be responsible for approving the recommendations set out in the Final Assessment Report; who will be responsible for providing any resources entailed by those recommendations; any changes in organization, policy or governance that will be necessary to meet the recommendations and who will be responsible for acting on those recommendations; and timelines for acting on and monitoring the implementation of those recommendations. Executive Summary of the Cyclical Program Review of the BSW, MSW and Ph.D. Programs in Social Work in the School of Social Work In accordance with the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP), the School of Social Work submitted a self-­‐study in March 2014 to the Associate Vice-­‐President (Faculty) and Associate Vice-­‐
President and Dean of Graduate Studies to initiate the cyclical program review of its programs. The approved self-­‐study presented program descriptions, learning outcomes, and analyses of data provided by the Office of Institutional Research and Analysis. Appendices to the self-­‐study contained all course outlines associated with the program and the CVs for each full-­‐time member in the Department. Two arms-­‐length reviewers, one from British Columbia and one from Calgary, and one internal reviewer, selected from a set of proposed reviewers, examined the materials and completed a site visit on April 7 -­‐ 8, 2014. The visit included interviews with the Provost and Vice-­‐President (Academic); Associate Vice-­‐
President (Faculty); Associate Vice-­‐President and Dean of Graduate Studies; and meetings with a group of current Ph.D. and MSc students, full-­‐time faculty and support staff. The Director of the School of Social Work and the Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences submitted responses to the Reviewers’ Report (July/August 2014). Specific recommendations were discussed and clarifications and corrections were presented. Follow-­‐up actions and timelines were included. McMaster’s Quality Assurance Committee (QAC) reviewed the above documentation and the committee determined that all the programs that were reviewed were of excellent quality. The QAC recommend that, subject to a satisfactory 18-­‐month interim report, the programs should next be reviewed according to the regular cycle. The Final Assessment Report was prepared by the QAC in February 2015, to be submitted to Graduate Council and Senate. In their report (May 2014), the Review Team provided feedback that describes how the BSW, MSW and Ph.D. programs in Social Work meet the Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) evaluation criteria and are consistent with the University’s mission and academic priorities. The Review Team 59
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wrote that the School of Social Work at McMaster University is a well-­‐run, innovative academic unit that offers high quality programs across all levels of education. Based upon a review of the School’s self-­‐
study and site visit discussions, the review team was confident in saying it remains a leader in social work education on a national level. The School of Social Work is closely aligned with McMaster University’s mandate and direction. It is also a School that receives strong support by senior university administration, and its fit in the Faculty of Social Sciences appears to a good fit. It was the Reviewers’ sense that the School of Social Work is a leader within the institution in terms of community engagement, student experience and community-­‐
based research. It demonstrates the potential to be a “flagship” school for McMaster University in these areas. The reviewers’ report noted that a recent accreditation review conducted by the Canadian Association of Social Work Education (CASWE) concluded that the School’s BSW and MSW programs are of the highest quality. The IQAP review team concurred with this conclusion. The social work PhD program at McMaster University was started in 2008 so it is still evolving. At this point, however, the PhD program appears to be solid. The curriculum focus is typical of social work PhD programs across Canada, and expectations for students are appropriate for a high quality PhD program. The Reviewers further noted that the School enjoys the contributions of a strong faculty and staff complement. It has an experienced and competent Director and the current transition to a new Director is being managed very capably and smoothly. Other administrators in the Faculty, such as those who manage field placements, are also very experienced and skillful. There is a strong, collective commitment to the School demonstrated by faculty, staff, students and community constituents. Together these elements have created an academic unit that functions well internally, with a culture of inclusiveness and openness that would be envied by any school across the country. These elements have also helped establish the School as a highly respected organization in the community, and many external human service agencies in the region express a particular affiliation to McMaster University as a result. There are of course current challenges faced by the School. The Reviewers’ report noted that the School appears to be at a crossroad in terms of making decisions about its identity and future directions. The combined BA/BSW program is undoubtedly going to be impacted by the dwindling three-­‐year BA reality in Ontario. The School could choose to focus on a four-­‐year honours BSW program in response. There is also opportunity to create a two-­‐year MSW program for post-­‐BA students. This, however, would shift the unique nature of the School and create some challenges in managing diverse student populations. The review team also identified options for other Master’s degrees that the School could lead within the institution. The Review Team’s general conclusion is that the School of Social Work is an academic unit marked by a remarkable culture of trust, collegiality, respect, excitement, critical consciousness, and ethical responsibility. These attributes have profoundly shaped the School. Moreover, what makes the School stand out with regard to these qualities is the embeddedness of these qualities across the School's constituencies; in teaching, administration, and scholarship; and in everyday social relations. In short, McMaster University should rightfully be very proud of the School of Social Work for its people, programs and position within the community. The following program strengths and weaknesses were noted: 60
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Strengths ! The School offers an outstanding program at the bachelor’s level, with many unique features that are envied by the reviewers ! There is a strong sense of collegiality within the School ! The graduate programs are of excellent quality Weaknesses ! At the time of the review, several issues were raised around the combined BA/BSW program. These are however being addressed, as this program is phased out and a 4-­‐year BSW program is being put in place ! Issues around the School’s practicum database were raised; however these have been addressed by new funding that has been provided for new software ! There were several suggested enhancements to the MSW program, including potential for expansion by introducing (a) new program(s) that require further careful analysis and implementation ! Questions were raised around the adequacy of the faculty complement to provide necessary mentorship for PhD students and ongoing coordination of field placements. The faculty complement will require careful attention as several retirements are expected in the near future ! The reviewers noted that graduate student funding rates are not competitive with other similar institutions; this issue is to some extent beyond the School’s control, but several initiatives are under way to address some of these concerns ! Increased diversity of the student body would be desirable; several initiatives have been implemented in this direction The Director of the School of Social Work submitted a response to the Reviewers’ Report (July 2014). The (Acting) Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences submitted his response to the Reviewers’ Report and the Program’s Response in September 2014. Specific recommendations were discussed, along with follow-­‐up actions to aid in addressing the recommendations. The Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, in consultation with the Director of the School shall be responsible for monitoring the recommendation implementation plan. The details of the progress made will be presented in the 18-­‐month Follow-­‐up Report and filed in the Associate Vice-­‐President, Faculty’s Office and in the School of Graduate Studies. Summary of the Reviewers’ Recommendations with the School’s and Dean’s Responses Recommendations for Undergraduate Programs 1. Decisions around the implementation of a new practicum database need to be settled. Response: The School noted that the limitations of the current “community connections” database system are well known at the School and well understood at the Faculty level. Program staff have identified a very promising system, designed specifically for managing field education programs and well tested and reviewed by field staff and faculty at the University of Calgary. A description and budget for initial and ongoing costs is currently being prepared and will be presented to the Acting Dean. 61
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The Dean has advised that since the Review Team’s visit, the School requested funding from the Faculty of Social Sciences for a new database system and the Faculty has been able to provide the funds to replace the practicum database. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of the School Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 2. Ensure that practice-­‐focused classes are of sizes that permit the integration of skills and theory necessary for professional practice. Response: The School noted that this recommendation will be taken up in the planned transition from the BA/BSW to the Honours BSW. The Dean advised that the Faculty supports the School’s efforts to review the structure of the undergraduate program and that an honours four-­‐year BSW would be in keeping with the direction being explored by other academic units in the Faculty. Responsibility for Following Up: Director, School of Social Work Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month follow up report 3. Increase the flexibility in the undergraduate program Response: The School anticipates that the upcoming reorganization of the BA/BSW into an honours BSW will directly address the concerns surrounding workload and scheduling for students. The undergraduate education committee will also consider suggestions from the reviewers to introduce further flexibility. The Dean noted that the reorganization to an honours BSW will allow for greater flexibility in the undergraduate program. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of the School with the undergraduate education committee Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report 4. Diversity Initiatives: Increase attention to diversity in the curriculum and increase the diversity of the student body Response: The School highlights that alongside ongoing activities of School committees and caucuses, the recently awarded Forward with Integrity grant for Faculty Development will enhance instructors’ capacities for teaching and learning about Indigenous-­‐Settler relations. The project will also support instructors to appropriately integrate Indigenous practices of healing, helping, community building and activism into the social work curriculum. This project will be implemented over the 2014-­‐2015 academic year. Faculty members and School staff have recently initiated discussions with Human Rights and Equity Services to develop a plan for further diversifying the Social Work study body. An early initiative will involve a review of the Social Work Admissions Test (SWAT) and testing process, with the aim of introducing principals of universal design. Easily managed changes will be introduced in 2015, and a more long-­‐term plan for changes in admissions, program structure and student supports developed over the following years. This work will necessarily occur in concert with campus partners, particularly Student Accessibility Services. The Dean noted that the School is also currently reviewing ways to diversify its student body through changes to its admissions process and to better integrate anti-­‐oppressive content across the curriculum in its undergraduate and graduate programs. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of the School Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 62
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Recommendations for MSW Program 5. Improve research course sequencing and make logic of courses more visible Response: The Director of the School advised that the instructors of the MSW research courses are meeting with the School’s Director and Chair of Graduate Studies to review the issue highlighted by some MSW students about the merits of having two research focused courses, and to consider changes to better support all students in designing, implementing and writing up their thesis research. The reviewers noted that the conversation about the research courses is linked in part to admissions requirements (especially the requirement for work experience), a topic that will also be considered in the planned meeting. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of the School Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 6. Opportunities for expansion at the Master’s level (suggestions: A two-­‐year MSW (either alongside or replacing the current post-­‐degree BSW), an MA in Community-­‐Engaged Research & Evaluation or an MA/MSW in Ethical Leadership) Response: The school advised that a task group has been struck to move forward with planning at the MA level. They are currently developing curriculum models, and exploring costs, for a Master’s in Ethical Human Service Leadership. At the same time the task group is exploring models of 2-­‐year (and 2+ year) MSWs. The group is considering whether and how it might be possible to sustain the unique and valued character of the School’s current graduate program while at the same time preparing students well for advanced social work practice. The Dean noted that the introduction of a new MA in Ethical Human Service Leadership would help maintain the unique nature of the School and ensure that it does not directly compete with neighouring schools of social work. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of the School with task force Timeline: Update at 18-­‐month report Recommendations for Ph.D. Program 7. Ensure senior faculty are replaced so that supervisory capacity and experience is not eroded. Response: The School noted that with respect to supervisory supports, students drew reviewers’ attention to the School’s relatively small faculty complement. The recent hire of a CLA will go some distance to easing this concern. At the same time reviewers again flagged upcoming retirements at the School, and indicated that at minimum the current faculty-­‐student ratio needs to be maintained in order to support the quality of instruction and supervision at the PhD level. 8. Improve access to wider range of scholarship funding Response: The School advised that this topic will be taken up by the School’s Graduate Studies in the fall. The Dean highlighted that the notable success of doctoral applications for external funding may help free up some scholarship resources that can be used to support other Ph.D. students. Responsibility for Following Up: Director of the School Timeline: Follow up at 18-­‐month report 63
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9. Student supports: Increase flexibility in program structure and make funding rates more competitive. Response: The School acknowledged that students raised concerns with reviewers about the expectation to complete in four years, and the limits placed on paid work hours. The School noted that the expectation for completion in four years is especially ill suited to the School’s doctoral students, who typically enter the program with substantial practice and/ or research experience, established professional careers and ongoing community engagements. While the School has strategies in place to support students through varied trajectories, policies set elsewhere in the University and beyond are not immediately amenable to intervention by the School. The School also mentioned that the reviewers commented favourably on the high levels of support provided to students on their fellowship applications, a practice the School intends to continue. The Dean suggested that reducing the flexibility in the timing of comprehensive examinations may be one way to help move students through the program in a timely manner. The Dean noted that the Faculty will continue to work with the School of Graduate Studies to ensure that graduate student funding is adequate and competitive. Quality Assurance Committee Recommendations The Committee finds that the programs are of excellent quality, and that the review raises a number of important but not critical points that could be addressed to improve the programs. Subject to satisfactory progress in addressing these issues being demonstrated in the 18-­‐month follow-­‐up report, the Committee recommends that the program proceed to the next review at the normal time, i.e. at 8 years after the present review. 64

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