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Florida 2-1-1 Association
Membership Report - 2013
Our mission is to be visible and accessible to
assist Florida’s residents and visitors in need of
2-1-1 services.
www.fl211association.org
Page | 0
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Overview
2-1-1 is a telephone based service offered by nonprofit and public agencies throughout Florida and the
United States. 2-1-1 organizations provide free, confidential information and referral services. Trained
professionals are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to help callers identify and connect with
health and human service programs that can meet a variety of needs including food, housing,
employment, health care, crisis counseling and more. Services are available statewide through any cell
phone provider as well as through landlines in all of Florida’s 67 counties and nationwide in all 50 states.
The Florida 2-1-1 Association (FL2-1-1) is a membership organization consisting of 2-1-1 agency or 2-1-1
program chief executive officers who express a commitment to the other members and to the primary
purpose of promoting the continued development and ongoing maintenance of high-quality, efficient,
effective & sustainable 2-1-1 services throughout the State of Florida.
The Florida 2-1-1 Association offers its members a forum to:




communicate regularly;
coordinate marketing and service delivery efforts;
expand awareness; and,
explore new opportunities for partnerships with human service organizations, business and
government.
The goal of the Florida 2-1-1 Association is to facilitate increased cooperation and collaboration among
2-1-1 member organizations. Members of the Florida 2-1-1 Association are committed to providing
mutual support; demonstrating respect for existing service areas, contracts and funding streams; and
acting with honesty & integrity.
Information contained in this document is the result of survey responses by all 14 Florida 2-1-1
Association members in 2013. All information is based on self-reporting by Association members and is
meant to provide baseline information about the whole of the Association membership.
Florida 2-1-1 Association Officers 2013-2014
Catherine F. Penrod, 2-1-1/Switchboard of Miami
Susan K. Buza, 211 Palm Beach/Treasure Coast
Libby Donoghue, 2-1-1 Brevard
Chair
Vice Chair
Secretary/Treasurer
Page | 1
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Florida 2-1-1 Association Members
2-1-1
2-1-1 Leader
Website
2-1-1 Big Bend
Randy Nicklaus, President & CEO
www.211bigbend.org
2-1-1 Brevard
Libby Donoghue, Executive Director
www.211brevard.org
2-1-1 Broward
Sheila Smith, President & CEO
www.211-broward.org
2-1-1 Charlotte
Dr. Faezeh Andrews, I & R Supervisor
www.charlottefl.com
2-1-1 Escambia
Rita Icenogle, Director
www.unitedwayescambia.org
2-1-1 Lee, Hendry & Glades
Linda Hafner, Director
www.unitedwaylee.org
2-1-1 Manasota
Jessica Ventimiglia, Executive Director
www.uw211manasota.net
2-1-1 Northeast Florida
Bob Arnold, Director
www.uwnefl.org
2-1-1 Palm Beach/
Treasure Coast
Susan Buza, Executive Director
www.211pbtc.org
2-1-1 Panhandle
Terra Free, Administrative Clerk
www.copecenter.org
2-1-1 Switchboard of Miami
Catherine Penrod, CEO
www.switchboardmiami.org
2-1-1 Tampa Bay Cares
Micki Thompson, Executive Director
www.211tampabay.org
2-1-1 Tampa Bay Crisis Center Mordecai Dixon, Program Manager
www.crisiscenter.com
2-1-1 Volusia & Flagler
www.liveunitedinvolusiaflagler.org
Loretta Wilary, Director
Page | 2
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
The Reach of the Florida 2-1-1
Association members
19,317,568
Total Florida Population
14,720,158
Total Population Served by
Florida 2-1-1 Association
76%
of the State’s population
has access to a FL 2-1-1 Association
Member’s services
67 Counties in Florida
49 are covered by the FL 2-1-1
Association
Counties, with Population1, Served by Florida 2-1-1 Association Members
Baker
25,000
Bay
169,856
Brevard
540,000
Broward
1,815,137
Calhoun
14,750
Charlotte
162,449
Clay
178,000
Collier
332,427
Columbia
67,000
DeSoto
34,862
Duval
800,000
Escambia
299,114
Flagler
95,696
Franklin
11,530
Gadsden
47,506
Glades
13,000
Gulf
15,844
Hamilton
4,000
Hendry
37,000
Hernando
173,422
Hillsborough
1,277,746
Holmes
19,873
Indian R.
139,446
Jackson
49,292
Jefferson
14,478
Lee
645,000
Leon
277,670
Liberty
8,519
Madison
19,227
Manatee
327,142
Martin
147,203
Miami-Dade
2,591,035
Monroe
74,809
Nassau
67,000
Okaloosa
183,482
Okeechobee
39,805
Palm Beach
1,335,415
Pinellas
921,319
Putnam
74,000
St. Johns
175,000
St. Lucie
280,355
S. Rosa
154,104
Sarasota
379,448
Suwannee
40,000
Taylor
22,898
Volusia
494,593
Wakulla
30,771
Walton
59,000
Washington
24,935
1
In addition to the United States Census, Association members reported using the following sources for population figures:
University of Florida, Bureau of Economic & Business Research and Office of Economic and Demographic Research (both of
which use figures from the US Census as well).
Page | 3
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
In 2012
Total 2-1-1 Calls Answered by Association Members
Total I &R Calls Answered by Association Members on Other Lines
Total 2-1-1/I&R Calls Answered by Association Members
832,469
206,088
1,018,292
Always Available.
All 2-1-1 Association members operate 24-hours either in-house or through
subcontracting. Four 2-1-1s outsource for full coverage with 2-1-1 Big Bend, 21-1 Brevard, 2-1-1 Tampa Bay Cares and the Center for Abuse and Emergencies.
All are noted as AIRS accredited.
Of the 14 Centers, 13 answer calls in Spanish as well as English. In addition, 5
answer in Haitian-Creole; 3 in Portuguese; 1 in French; 1 in Hebrew; 1 in Italian;
1 in German; and, 1 in Yiddish. All but 1 Center uses a third party language
interpreter service.
Vendors Used
Language Line
Optimal Phone Interpreters
Pacific Interpreters
TeleLanguage
TeleInterpreters
eight
two
one
one
one
2-1-1s
2-1-1s
2-1-1
2-1-1
2-1-1
Page | 4
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
A National
Movement
A telephone-based
service offered by
nonprofit and public
organizations
throughout Florida
and the United
States, 2-1-1
provides
information and
referral services and
over the phone
counseling. Trained professionals help callers identify needs and connect with health and human service
programs for help with food, housing, employment, health care, crisis counseling and more. Services are
available statewide through any cell phone provider as well as through landlines in all of Florida’s 67
counties and nationwide in all 50 states. Services are provided free-of-charge, in confidence and without
judgment.
Accreditations
As part of the 2-1-1s ongoing efforts to set, maintain and enhance standards of operations, many are
accredited by various organizations. Most Florida 2-1-1 Association members are accredited through
the Alliance of Information and Referral Systems. Two are not and one of those is currently in the initial
accreditation process. Others are accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, ContactUSA
and many have some level of licensure through the Florida Department of Children & Families.
Individual 2-1-1s have other credentials through: Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation
Facilities; Office of Early Learning; National Incident Management System; and, NonProfits First of Palm
Beach County.
Is your 2-1-1 accredited or in the
reaccreditation/initial
accreditation process?
Yes
No
13
Is your 2-1-1 accredited by the
American Association of
Suicidology?
Yes
No
No Answer
2
8
4
1
Is your 2-1-1 accredited by
ContactUSA?
Yes
No
No Answer
2
9
3
Is your 2-1-1 licensed through DCF?
Level
Level
Level Level
Level Level
1
2
1
1
2
2
No
No
Yes
No
Yes
No
Ans
Ans
4
7
3
1
10
3
Page | 5
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
What 2-1-1s ASK Callers and then DOCUMENT
Florida 2-1-1 Association members indicated that callers are frequently asked such demographic
questions as age range, gender, race/ethnicity, primary language spoken, military veteran status and
whether the caller has health insurance or not. Some ask if the caller has a disability and what his or her
income level is. None ask about sexual orientation or education level. Only one asks if the caller
considers him/herself to be a transgender individual.
Question Asked
Health Insurance?
Age Range?
Veteran Status?
Race/Ethnicity?
Primary Language?
Disability?
Income Level?
Gender?
Transgender?
Sexual Orientation?
Education Level?
# of 2-1-1s
That DO Ask
13
12
11
9
9
7
5
1
1
0
0
# of 2-1-1s
That Do NOT Ask
1
2
3
5
5
7
9
12
12
14
14
# of 2-1-1s
No Answer
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
Because 2-1-1s are funded by a variety of organizations, information that is
asked and documented by the individual units may vary based on the funders’
requirements. Not as frequently, other information asked by 2-1-1s includes:






 Number of
minor children in the
household (two 2-11s indicated this question)?
Age range of minor children?
School(s) attended by children in the
household?
Summer food needs for school aged
children?
Date of Birth (caller’s)?
Does caller have internet access?
How did caller hear about 2-1-1?
 Household Configuration (includes if
homeless at risk of homelessness)(two
2-1-1s)?
 Reason for homeless episode?
 Needs of homeless children?
 Need for diabetes information?
 Calling for benefits eligibility screening?
 Benefits type?
 Benefits amount?
 Zip code?
 City?
All 2-1-1s indicated that if any of the above information is not specifically asked during the call, but the
information is revealed during conversation with caller, the information is generally documented. In the
commentary section the following clarifications were provided by individual 2-1-1s.
 Any information revealed is documented in a narrative or notes section.
 Age is covered as "over 60" only; race/ethnicity and gender are generally "guessed" except
when it is critical to eligibility.
 Language is determined by the need to use tele-interpreter.
 Info on other characteristics may be noted in narrative but is not tracked .
 Info on race/ethnicity is never requested or documented.
Page | 6
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Call Metrics & Data Systems
Average wait time for calls to be answered by an information and referral specialist2 is subject to many
variables. The actual time (morning, afternoon, evening, late evening, early morning) of the call was
cited as a prime determinant. Fl 2-1-1 Association members report a range from the average longest
wait time of 2 minutes, 4 seconds to the shortest of 9 seconds. Once the calls are answered the actual
talk time can be as little as two minutes or as long as 8 minutes and 4 seconds. This depends on the
reason for the call and its complexity. For example, a call from someone who is depressed, homeless
and addicted will have great needs that someone just trying to find a summer camp for their child. The
caller’s ability to fully articulate their situation is also a factor. The knowledge and skill of the Specialist
will also affect the length of the talk time. Staffing levels, which vary based on geography and funding
(and funding cuts), are also an obvious consideration for both average wait times and average talk
times. Fewer people to answer calls means that callers will likely have to wait. Fewer specialists could
also impact talk time since they will be anxious to move from one call to the next.
Most 2-1-1s use the same system to collect and save caller
information as well as the service provider/referral information (the
community resource database). Of these, the majority use a third
party data vendor.
Three 2-1-1s manage own databases.
Bowman/IRis Systems are the vendors used by most 2-1-1s. Two 21-1s use VisionLink. CharityLogic, North Light, Inc. and BOCC IT are
used individually by three different 2-1-1s. Most have used the
same system for 4 or more years. No 2-1-1 has plans to change
systems although four either didn’t answer the question or noted
they may plan to consider a change in the future. There are two 2-11s that are not using the same system to manage caller and service
provider information or to collect and save caller information.
System used to collect and save caller AND service provider/referral information?
3rd Party Vendor
11
Manage Own Database
3



Comments
Own database is not web-based.
Using Community OS,
We use both and also have IRis on the web.
rd
#3 Party Data Systems Used by 2-1-1s, by # of 2-1-1s and for how long
Bowman/IRis
CharityLogic
North Light
VisionLink
7
1
1
2
All used for 4+ yrs
Used for 2-3 yrs
Used for 4+ yrs
Used for 4+ yrs
2-1-1s the do NOT use the same system
to collect and save client AND service
provide/referral information
2
Other
BOCC IT
Used for 4+ yrs
2-1-1s Planning to Move Client Management &/or service referral
management systems?
YES
NO
No
Answer/Maybe
0
0
4
2
This position has various titles in different 2-1-1s. In general, this refers to the person who is
answering the call in the Contact/Call Center to provide 2-1-1 services.
Page | 8
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Programs and Services
The numbers “2-1-1” actually refer to two things. One is the 3 digits an individual can dial or
press to be connected to appropriate local social services. The other somewhat more generic
use is to refer to the organization itself. Members of the Association are all “2-1-1s” meaning a
contact/call center offering information and referral services. To somewhat complicate the
matter, many 2-1-1s actually offer more services than information and referral and sometimes
these are accessed by calling “2-1-1.” Other 2-1-1s have other community programs that have
nothing to do with phones.
Pivotal Role in Disaster
Eleven of the 2-1-1s relocate to the local Emergency Operations Center during times of disaster,
particularly when a hurricane warning has been issued. One additional center is already located in a
county facility. Two do not relocate; only one center does not continue to operate as a 2-1-1 during
disaster. The goal is to provide information before, during and usually after the disaster to callers in
need of services or seeking assistance with disaster related anxiety. Nine 2-1-1s have back-up
agreements with other organizations to ensure coverage if necessary. These agreements are with:








MOU Leon County/ Tallahassee Public Safety Facility
2-1-1 San Diego
2-1-1 Big Bend
2-1-1 Brevard
211 New Jersey
Tampa Bay Cares, Inc.
Pinellas Co EMA
Hernando County EMA
Suicide Prevention
Many 2-1-1s have a history of answering calls made when an individual is in crisis. More than half are
members of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network of 118 crisis centers throughout the
country. Members can have a wide variety of duties, but the prime responsibility is to keep individuals
safe from suicide and answer 1-800-273-TALK at a minimum.
Suicide
Is 2-1-1 a member of NSPL?
Yes
No
No Ans
If "NO," suicide calls answered on
other lines?
8
5
1
Yes – three 2-1-1s, No – two 2-1-1s
Page | 9
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Other Lines Managed By 2-1-1s
(In some instances, these other “lines” are answered on the 2-1-1-designated line.)
Four 2-1-1s indicated they only answer 2-1-1 lines. While other types of calls will likely come in on these
2-1-1 lines, they are generally promoted as information and referral.
386-253-0564 - 10 digit number for I&R
800-273-TALK
800-SUICIDE
After Hours/Holidays/Etc. Coverage for other 2-1-1s
AlphaNet
Alzheimer's Community Care CrisisLine
Autism Society
Behavioral Health Helpline
Brevard C.A.R.E.S.
Child Care Resource and Referral
COPE HELPline (Wisconsin - After Hours) * Not the C.O.P.E. Center – Panhandle 2-1-1
Crisis Hotline of Central Florida
CROS Appointment Scheduling
DACCO (local)
Disaster Distress
Escambia County Child Care Resource and Referral
Family Health Line (statewide)
Family Stabilization (local)
Florida HIV/AIDS Hotline (statewide)
HELPline
Homeless Helpline
Mission United
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
NCADI
PBC Victim Services Hotline
RAINN
Rape Crisis Hotline
Senior Services
Special Needs Helpline
St. Lucie Fire District Smoke Detectors
Support Services for Veterans & Military Families
Services for Seniors and Individuals with Disabilities
Some 2-1-1s target seniors for specific service delivery. Half have a telephone reassurance program
where staff/volunteers call individual seniors a prescribed amount of times each week to ensure their
well-being. Others provide call-downs for their respective counties to those with disabilities during
disaster. One 2-1-1 provides outbound alerts to seniors and those with disabilities.
Outbound calls
to Srs? Yes
7
Outbound calls
to Srs? No
7
Prior to disaster, Outbd calls
to those w. disabilities? Yes
4
? No
10
Outbd Alerts?
Yes
1
Outbd Alerts?
No
13
Page | 10
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Chat and Text
While new technologies are discussed at length and are known to be how 2-1-1-type services will be
attained in part in the future, Association members seem to largely still rely on the phone as the method
to deliver 2-1-1 connections. It is anticipated that as the population demographics shift, this will likely
change.
Does your 2-1-1 Offer Chat services?
Chat, I&R only
- Yes
Chat I&R only
- No
Chat Suicide only
– Yes
Chat Suicide only
- No
Chat All lines
- Yes
Chat All lines
- No
2
12
2
14
3
11
Does your 2-1-1 Offer Texting services?
Text I&R only
– No
Text I&R only
– No
Text Suicide only
– Yes
Text Suicide only
- No
Text All lines Yes
Text All lines
- No
0
14
1
13
1
13
Other Services
Half of the Association members offer Prevention Programs (known as “youth wellness programs” in
some areas). Two 2-1-1s offer Clinical Services while five indicate they provide other “face-to-face”
services. Beyond this, specific 2-1-1s provide other community assistance. Two, for example, are part
of the Child Care Resource & Referral Network. One generates custom resource directories and still
others offer suicide prevention training to outside groups and interested others.
Does your 2-1-1 Offer Other Services to Youth, Families and/or Individuals?
Prevention
Programs? Yes
Prevention
Programs? No
Clinical
Services
Yes
Clinical
Services
No
7
7
2
12
Additional “Other” Services, include:
 Print & On-line custom resource
directories, (e.g., for inmates being
released, Senior White Pages, Sarasota
School Board Resource Directory,
Developmental Disabilities Resource
Directory, etc.)
 Wishbook & Seasons of Sharing –
holiday financial assistance programs
Other face-toface svcs? Yes
Other face-toface svcs? No
5
9





Health Navigation
Elder Advocacy Navigation
Benefits Eligibility/pre-screening
Summer Break Spot
Phone Based Advocacy on behalf of
Callers/Clients
 Applied Suicide Intervention Skills
Training
Page | 11
Collaborations & Networks
Most 2-1-1s realize the need for and value added through working with other organizations. By the very
definition of purpose, no 2-1-1 can provide information and referral services without having solid
community relationships. A review of the information provided by Association 2-1-1s, demonstrates the
reach and influence they maintain. A partial listing of collaborations and networks include:
2-1-1 Florida Association
Abuse, Neglect and Dependency (AND) Committee Pinellas
Aging Coalition for South Dade
Aging in Place Action Team
Alliance of Information and Referral Systems (AIRS)
American Association of Suicidology
American Society on Aging
Association of Fundraising Professionals
BigBendWorks.com
Chambers of Commerce - Miami, Miami Beach,
South Miami, Coral Gables, Gay & Lesbian, Minority
Communities United Disaster Distress Task Force
Chambers of Commerce in Manatee County, DeSoto
County, and Venice
Child Care Aware - National CCR&R Association
City of Jacksonville’s Emergency Operations Center ESF-15
Clearwater Regional Chamber of Commerce
COAD & COAD Strike Team(Communities Organizing
After Disasters)
Cold Night Shelter – Hotline &Information
Community Alliance of Sarasota County
Community Based Alliance – DCF/Foster Program
Oversight
Community Foundation of Sarasota County
Community In Training
Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD)
CZP Partnership
Dept of Health Diabetes Self-Management Program
DeSoto County Consortium
Early Childhood Mental Health System of Care
Consortium
Early Learning Coalition Service Advisory Council Pinellas
Elder Care Network
ElderSource Committee
Emergency Financial Assistance Reform Committee
Emergency Services and Homeless Coalition of
Jacksonville, Inc.
EscaRosa Coalition on the Homeless
Florida Alliance of Information and Referral Services
(FLAIRS)
Florida Council Against Sexual Violence
Florida Homeless Coalition for the Homeless
Florida Prosperity Partnership
Florida VOAD Volunteer Directors Association Pinellas
Health Action Network
Help ME Grow Statewide Task Force
Hispanic Services Coalition - Pinellas
Homeless and Hunger Coalition Northwest Florida
Homeless Strike Team of COAD
Human Services Coalition of PBC
Human Services Council (HSC) - Basic Needs Priority
Focus Area
Human Trafficking Coalition
Human Trafficking Network
Interagency Coalitions
Interagency Council (Escambia/Santa Rosa)
Jacksonville Jaguars Foundation
Lee County Task Force on Hoarding
Lee Elder Abuse Prevention Partnership LEAPP
LGBTQ Youth Alliance
Life: Act 2 – Robert Wood Johnson grant committee
Little Havana Coalition
Manatee County Consortium
Mary Bradley Weeks Educational Project/School
Supplies
Mental Health Collaborative IRC
Miami Beach Service Partnership
Miami Dade Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce
Executive Roundtable
Miami Thrives (Catalyst)
Girls Coalition
NAMI
NEFHIC (Northeast Florida Health Informatics
Consortium)
NEFIN (Northeast Florida Information Network)
Steering Committee
NHSDC - National Human Services Data Consortium
Nonprofit Chamber – Palm Beach County
Page | 13
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
NonProfit Committee of Greater Miami Chamber of
Commerce
North Dade Service Partnership
NTEN - National Technology Education Network
Partnership for a Healthy Community
PATH (Persons Assisting the Homeless)
Pinellas Disaster Recovery Leadership Network
Pinellas Family Services Initiative
Pinellas Homeless Leadership Board
Pinellas Park Gateway Chamber of Commerce
Pinellas Prosperity Partnership
PrideLines
PROUD - Pinellas Recovery Organizations United in
Disaster
RAINN Network
Real$ense Prosperity Campaign
Renaissance Community Center Advisory Committee
Sarasota Ministerial Alliance
Senior Hunger Task Force Community Assistance
Network
SSVF Collaborative
Sexual Assault Response Team Network - Pinellas
Shared Services Network Okeechobee
St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce
Summer Break Spot Program with the Department
of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Summer Food Program – Florida Department of
Agriculture
Suncoast Partnership to End Homelessness. Gulf
Coast Community Foundation - Homeless Families
with Children Initiative
Synergy Partnership of Concerned African Women
The Children’s Movement
The Commonwealth Institute
The Miami Coalition (One Voice)
Tri-county "Back to School" Informational Events
United Way Agency Meetings
University of Miami Caregiving Project
Veteran's Glades Initiative
Veterans Stand Down Coalition
VOAD – Voluntary Organizations Active in Disaster
Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
Women's Leadership Initiative
YES Institute
Youth Counts – Youth Homeless Census Taskforce
The Business of Being A “2-1-1”
Because each “2-1-1” organization is an outgrowth of a community need, the establishment and
subsequent structure of local units may look same or very different. Of the fourteen 2-1-1 Association
members, eight are stand-alone organizations, four are part of a United Way, one is part of county
government and one is the relatively new program of a mental health center. Each official name of the
individual 2-1-1s may include the geographic location or not. Six 2-1-1s have “doing business as” names
(DBAs).
Twelve of the 2-1-1s are governed by boards of directors. Two are not, but
indicate another form of governance such as a county commission or a 2-1-1
council. Of those with boards, the range is 12-40 board members. The
average number of directors is 17.
# Directors
12
15
16
21
25
30
35
40
# 2-1-1s
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
Page | 14
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Most of the 2-1-1s operate on a fiscal year beginning July 1 and ending June 30. Three others begin on
October 1 and run through September 30. One operates on a
calendar year beginning January 1.
Budgets reported were on a wide continuum. As a percentage
of the entire 2-1-1 budgets submitted, it appears that
administrative costs range 2% to 14%. Because most standards
advocate for no more than 20% administrative costs, based on
the responses received, member 2-1-1s seem to use more of
their funds to cover costs related to the provision of programs
and services in their respective communities.
Income for 2-1-1s appears to be largely generated by
foundation and government grants. Twelve indicated that
100% of their revenue is received from these two types of
funding streams; two indicated they do not receive such
income. General fundraising such as special events, individual
donors, direct mail, etc. plays a significant role in some 2-1-1s,
but not in others. Activities such as training fees, after-hour
services, resource directories and for profit income generate
additional income. Other unspecified income is noted by three
2-1-1s.
% of Income from
Foundations &
Government
Grants
# 2-1-1s
Responding
% of Income
from
Fundraising
0%
11%
2
1
0%
1%
26%
30%
1
1
51%
60%
80%
86%
87%
94%
98%
98.6%
100%
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
# 2-1-1s
Responding
# 2-1-1s
Responding
4
1
% of
Income
from
Other
sources
0%
1%
2%
5%
1
1
1.4%
4%
1
1
10%
13%
14%
16%
70%
89%
2
1
1
1
1
1
8%
12%
30%
61%
1
1
1
1
4
1
Comment
For profit
income
Donations
Training fees,
Other fees,
Resource
directories
UW 25%
Page | 15
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
Who Funds 2-1-1s?
More United Ways fund 2-1-1s than any other organizations and in four instances are the largest funder.
County Governments also play a significant role in 2-1-1 and are the top funder of two. Five of the eight
established Florida Children’s Services Councils fund 2-1-1s and provide more funding than any other
entity to four of the five. The Department of Children and Families funds six 2-1-1s and is the top funder
for one. The Department of Health and one City provide the most funding to two other individual 2-11s.
Funder
# organizations
funding a 2-1-1
#1 funder for a
specific 2-1-1
United Way
County Government
Children’s Services Councils
DCF
Dept of Health
City (Jacksonville)
19*
14
5
6
1
1
4
2
4
1
1
1
*Because 2-1-1 organizations often cover areas other than where they are physically located,
additional United Ways fund 2-1-1s to ensure services are provided in their community.
Other Major Funders:
 Florida Cities (Tallahassee, Pensacola, Jacksonville -previously mentioned, Miami Gardens, St.
Petersburg – two funding streams)
 C.O.P.E Center (funds 2-1-1 100% from operational funds)
 Florida Office of Attorney General
 National Institutes of Mental Health
 Early Learning Coalition (Escambia County)
 SAMHSA (indicated by two 2-1-1s)
 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Emergency Services - Homeless Coalitions (St. Johns and Suwannee Valley Counties)
 Brevard C.A.R.E.S. (Child abuse prevention hotline screening)
Page | 16
Florida 2-1-1 Association - Membership Report 2013
How Are 2-1-1s Staffed?
All member 2-1-1s maintain at least one FTE. It seems that the majority of 2-1-1s employ 6-15 FTEs.
With 20-24 FTEs, one unit maintains the largest FTE
workforce. Of the fourteen 2-1-1s, eleven indicated they
supplement their 2-1-1 teams with part-time employees.
Two do not; one did not respond. Seven report employing
6-15 part-timers. Three 2-1-1s note they have an “on-call”
pool. In some instances, these individuals are regarded as
part-time employees.
# of 2-1-1s
1 FTE
3
3-5 FTEs
2
6-10 FTEs
3
# of 2-1-1s
PT?
Yes
11
PT?
No
2
Not
Reported
1
11-15 FTEs
3
16-19 FTEs
2
20-24 FTEs
1
3-5 PT
6-10 PT
11-15 PT
3
4
3
Volunteers, Interns and AmeriCorps members
Ten of the 2-1-1s report adding volunteers to supplement their workforce. One organization maintains
a volunteer cadre of 25+.
Three indicated
volunteers are not a part of their team. Four did not
answer this question. Five 2-1-1s utilize collegelevel interns to assist in the contact/call centers and
generally have between 1-10 each semester. Seven
do not utilize interns. Two did not answer this
question. Only one 2-1-1 indicated engagement
with AmeriCorps and has 11-16 members.
# of 2-1-1s
# of 2-1-1s
VOLS?
Yes
VOLS?
No
Not
reported
3-5
VOLS
6-10
VOLS
11-15
VOLS
16-24
Vols
25+
7
3
4
4
2
1
6
1
Interns?
Yes
Interns?
No
Not
Reported
1
Intern
3-5
Interns
6-10
Interns
5
7
2
2
1
2
Page | 17
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