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August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
PAGE A1
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Take One!
August 15, 2016
Settlement agreement
approved with injured
Inskip principal
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
A resolution on the agenda of the Knox
County Commission passed recently to
give some support to a special teacher
but the subject wasn’t discussed much
publicly because of the nature of the
matter.
“Consideration of
a Resolution of the
Commission of Knox
County, Tennessee,
authorizing the Knox
County Law Director
to Negotiate Benefits
Comparable to Worker’s Compensation,”
was the agenda item
Elisa Luna
requested by the
school system. No further explanation was on the announced
agenda that passed as a “consent” item
without public discussion.
“WHEREAS, at its regularly scheduled
meeting on July 6, 2016, the Knox County
Board of Education approved a resolution
authorizing the Knox County Law Director to negotiate benefits on its behalf
with Elisa C. Luna pursuant to T.C.A. §
49-5-714” the sub language of the resolution says.
The resolution from Knox County
Continued on page 4
RTI2 Comes
to KCS High
Schools
By Sally Absher
[email protected]
Knox County high school students
returned to school this fall to find their
schedule has been revised to accommodate something called “RTI2.” This year
marks the final phase of the implementation of RTI, the education framework
used across the country to identify students’ academic needs early in their educational career.
In Tennessee, this framework is known
as Response to Instruction and Intervention, or “RTI2.” The key here is the two
I’s…Instruction and Intervention.
The Tennessee State Board of Education adopted RTI in 2013, and mandated
that districts implement it beginning in
the summer of 2014. Districts implemented RTI2 at the elementary school level
in 2014-2015, followed by implementation in middle schools in 2015-2016, and
high schools in the current 2016-2017
school year.
According to the RTI Action Network,
the basis of RTI is supposed to be highquality instruction and “universal screening” of all children in the general education classroom, through quick tests of
specific skills.
Students who struggle to complete the
tasks required in the screener are supposed to be provided with interventions
at increasing levels of intensity, depending on their needs, in addition to receiving grade level instruction. If the student
Continued on page 2
PHOTO BY STEVE WILLIAMS
An eyesore in Fountain City for much of the past two years, visitors to Fountain City Lake as well as passersby have enjoyed the
beauty created by the lake’s fountain in recent days.
Making a splash in Fountain City
By Steve Williams
It’s amazing how much life
the fountain brings to Fountain City Lake.
Turned off for most of the
past two years as work has
been going on in the lake, the
fountain was turned on again
a little over a week ago to the
delight of many.
Samantha Baker, 2½ years
old, was among those to see
it Tuesday, Aug. 9.
“She was real excited when
she saw it,” said her father
Bryan Baker of Fountain City.
“A ‘waterfall’ – that’s what she
called it.”
Samantha soon turned her
attention to the ducks and
enjoyed feeding them.
“The fountain was turned
back on last week as our contractor begins to wrap up their
work on replacing the pump
and much of the piping and
infrastructure of the lake’s
filtration system,” noted City
of Knoxville Parks and Recreation Director Joe Walsh via
e-mail on Aug. 11.
“We are currently working
on getting the best combination of aesthetically pleasing
water flow from the fountain
and enough flow to help keep
the water in the lake moving
around. Things are looking
better, I think.”
Randy Sharp and his family
from Halls also were at the
Fountain City Lake Tuesday
and doing some fishing, including his wife Rachel and stepsons Mason Bailey and Colton
Bailey. Mason is a 7th grader
at Halls Middle School and
Colton is in the second grade
at Halls Elementary School.
A public meeting on the
Fountain City Lake project is
scheduled for Aug. 25 at 5:30
p.m. in the Lions Club Building
located at Fountain City Park,
5345 N. Broadway.
History Fair has a variety of
events this Saturday
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
Tom and Sue Wright as Abe and Mary Lincoln will be
at the East Tennessee History Fair Saturday in downtown Knoxville. They are pictured here from the event in
2014 with their grandson Kyle. (Photo courtesy of Tom
Wright)
This Saturday Knoxville will
be alive with history as the area
celebrates the East Tennessee
History Fair. “Have a Blast with
the Past” is the theme this year
and Saturday’s events range
from a Dog Costume Contest
to a celebration of Davy Crockett’s Birthday.
The event kicks off at 10
a.m. and features historic reenactors from various times in
the past, antique vendors, and
more than forty historical and
genealogical societies.
The East Tennessee History
Museum, where the ongoing
exhibit is “Voices of the Land:
The People of East Tennessee,”
will not be charging admission
for the day. There will also be
a miniature of the 1761 Fort
Loudoun battle by the Historic
Gaming Club of Knoxville, a “Kid
Stuff” Music Show and, at 2:15,
a celebration of Crockett with
Bilo Nelson.
Events outside the Museum
include the Historic Hound Dog
Costume Contest at Krutch
Park at 10:15, where celebrity
judges will award prizes for the
Best Costume and Most East
Tennessee Spirit. WDVX will
showcase live music at the Visitor’s Center. The Friends of the
Library will have a book sale in
the park beginning at 10 a.m.
and Mast General Store will
sponsor a checkers competition. Games and crafts will also
be held at the park.
At least ten authors will be
present at the park offering
their books including the faculty
of the University of Tennessee
History Department with several
titles available.
Exhibitors include the Abraham Lincoln Library and
Museum, Daughters of the
American Revolution, Fort Loudoun State Historic Site, the Girl
Scout Museum, Green McAdoo
Cultural Center, the Knoxville
Civil War Roundtable, the Knoxville History Project, Knoxville
Continued on page 2
The Knoxville Focus
PAGE A2
August 15, 2016
When are attorney’s fees recoverable?
You’ve heard
compensation
the phrase, “I
case. Attorneys
want to be awardknow and undered attorney’s
stand that their
fees,” in regard
fee is getting
to litigation. But
paid to them at
what exac tly
the conclusion
does that mean
of the case. And
and when does it By Jedidiah
in those cases
McKeehan
apply?
there isn’t a sepattorneyknoxville@
Generally, in gmail.com
arate “attorney’s
the state of Tenfee,” award.
nessee, attorney’s fees There is a lump sum award
are not recoverable unless which the attorney takes
you have entered into a a percentage of the total
contract which states that amount.
they are recoverable. That
So, what types of situameans you are typically tions might call for a conresponsible for paying all tract to allow for attorney’s
legal fees, even if you win fees to be recoverable?
the court case.
Here are a few:
What we are talking
● Property lease
about is different from a
● Business contract
personal injury or worker’s
● Credit card you have
signed up for (business or
personal)
● Relationship with a
doctor or dentist
In all of these contracts,
there is typically an attorney’s fee provision that
states something to the
effect of, “If litigation is
required to enforce the
terms of this agreement,
attorney’s fees and all reasonable and necessary
costs are recoverable.”
There are many more
instances where attorney’s
fees might be included in a
contract, but these are the
most common.
How exactly does that work
at a practical level?
If I want to sue someone
I was in a contract with, a
contract that includes a
provision for the recovery
of attorney’s fees, then I
would need to hire an attorney to file the lawsuit.
That means I would have
to pay the attorney’s fees
upfront in order to sue the
person who has breached
the contract.
If I win the case, I would
then receive:
1. Whatever the judge
awarded me for the breach
of the contract, and
2. Reimbursement of
the attorney’s fees which
I paid.
However, keep in mind
that while your contract
may say that you are entitled to attorney’s fees, it
is still up to the judge to
decide whether he wants to
award them to you or not.
If a judge believes that the
amount of attorney’s fees
requested is unreasonably
high, he may not award
them.
If you are unclear if your
contract includes the ability to recover attorney’s
fees, then you may want to
seek your own counsel or
ask questions of the other
party. Don’t sign a contract without being clear on
what you may have to pay
if someone sues to enforce
the terms of the contract.
Are There Any Other
Instances When Attorney’s
Fees Are Recoverable?
Yes, there are a few. If
you sue under the Tennessee Consumer Protection Act, you may be able
to recover attorney’s fees.
In a divorce case, you can
sometimes get attorney’s
fees awarded, but not very
often. There just are not
many instances in Tennessee law where they are
recoverable under than
those spelled out above.
Jedidiah McKeehan is
an attorney practicing in
Knox County and surrounding counties. He works
in many areas, including
criminal, personal injury,
landlord-tenant, probate,
and estate planning. Visit
attorney-knoxville.com for
more information about
this legal issue and other
legal issues.
RTI2 Comes to
KCS High Schools
Cont. from page 1
doesn’t respond to the
interventions, he or she is
referred to special education.
So how does RTI2 work,
and what does it mean for
your child?
Jennifer Nagel, Knox
C ount y parent and
educational advocate for
children with dyslexia,
provided the following
explanation.
“Tennessee uses a threetier RTI2 system. I want to
stress that ALL students
within public schools in TN
are in RTI2. This is where
the first “I” comes in to
play: Instruction.
She adds that most
students are in Tier 1,
which would be considered
general education classes.
There is no intervention for
students in Tier 1 - they may
be involved in enrichment
activities in grades K-8 or
take additional elective
classes in high school.
Tier 2 is for the students
who fall below the 25th
percentile and Tier 3 is for
the students who fall below
the 10th percentile based
on a universal screener
and also other data, such
as teacher input.
According to the RTI2
instruction
m anu al
provided by the state, RTI2
is the sole criteria by which
a student may be identified
as having a Specific
Learning Disability (SLD) in
the state of Tennessee as
of July 1, 2014.
Nagel explains, “RTI2 is
used to determine whether
a student has a SLD in Basic
Reading Skills, Reading
Comprehension, Reading
Fluency, Mathematics
Calculation, Mathematics
Problem-Solving or Written
Expression. (A few other
areas may be added in
the future, like behavioral
concerns and listening
comprehension).”
What should you, as a
parent, know if your child
is in Tier 2 or 3? First of
all, according to Nagel,
you should know that your
child is indeed within one
of those two tiers. A letter
will be sent home, and you
should also be receiving a
progress report every 4.5
weeks,. Accompanying the
progress report should
be your child’s progress
monitoring data.
Monitoring data is
collected at different
intervals, depending on
whether the student is
in Tier 2 or 3. This data
collection does not take
long - for example, in
elementary school the
reading assessments can
last one minute, and the
math assessments can
take up to 10 minutes. The
progress monitoring data
charts can be difficult to
understand at first, but,
Nagel stresses, parents
have every right to ask
questions.
Nagel has concerns
about the universal
screener being used in
Serving Knox and Surrounding Counties.
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KCS elementary and
middle schools, saying she
doesn’t believe the STAR
Renaissance screener
digs deep enough. It has no
writing component, so does
not test written expression,
and isn’t catching spelling
deficiencies. Apparently,
KCS agrees and is looking
to replace STAR. Nagel said
AIMSweb, which is being
used in high schools and
is more skills based, would
be a better screening
assessment for younger
students as well.
Implementation of RTI2
in elementary schools
across Knox County is fairly
uniform, since most schools
have similar schedules
and set ups. Tier 2 lasts
approximately 30 minutes
and Tier 3 approximately
45 minutes each day.
Middle and high school
have more variability due
to the different schedules
used at different schools.
For example, many high
schools on block scheduling
are utilizing a fifth “skinny”
block of 45 minutes each
day for RTI2, by reducing
the four -90 minute blocks
to 80 minutes each and
reducing the amount of
time between classes by
several minutes. West
High School’s blocks 1, 3,
and 4 meet every other day
and last 90 minutes each.
Block 2 is divided into two
45-minute “skinny” blocks
to accommodate RTI2
and/or elective class(es)
meeting every day.
It will be interesting
to see what impact the
current RTI2 mandate (30
to 45 minutes per day in
grades K-12), in addition to
the newly passed physical
activity requirements (225
minutes per week for
grades K-1; 160 minutes
per week for grades 2 -6;
and 90 minutes per week
from grades 8-12) has on
the time available for actual
classroom instruction
and learning. Students in
grades 9-12 lose about
18% of their core subject
classroom instruction time
to these mandates.
Nagel is coordinating
with Kerry Crook, KCS
RTI Program Facilitator,
to schedule two parent
information nights in
September - one for
elementary school and
another for Middle/
High school. She hopes
to provide additional
information about what
RTI2 is and how and why
Tennessee is using it, what
the reports that should be
coming home look like and
how to read them, and
what happens if your child
is not making progress to
“close the gap” within their
assigned Tier.
In the meantime, Nagel
highly recommends that
parents ask your child’s
teacher, principal or school
RTI2 representative any
school-specific questions
you may have. You can also
contact her at jranagel@
comcast.net
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are not guaranteed placement, we do strive to place as much as possible. Submissions for the paper are on a space available basis and
History Fair has a
variety of events this
Saturday
Cont. from page 1
Walking Tours and many
more groups.
Various living history reenactors will include the
1790s Knox County Militia,
the 79th NY Infantry and
8th Tennessee Volunteer
Infantry Civil War actors,
The Woman Suffrage Coalition, World War II soldiers,
Korean and Vietnam soldiers, and a Civil War uniform display.
On Market Street behind
the History Museum at
least 20 East Tennessee
antique dealers will set up
their wares. Across Gay
Street, the Tennessee Theater will host a backstage
tour at 10 a.m., a showing
of 1925 film “Shouldering
Fires” at 11:30 and Todd
Steed and The Silent Stomp
will perform at 2:30.
A Walking Tour will be
led by Jack Neely, featuring “Old City, Irish Town
and Cripple Creek.”
The History Fair also features a tour of the Duncan
Law Library, the original
city hall and former home
of the Tennessee School
for the Deaf, and a vintage
baseball game at Ramsey
House Plantation.
The History Fair overlaps
with the First Families of
Tennessee celebration
from August 19th through
the 21st.The descendants
of those pre-statehood
settlers will have a reunion
and jubilee with a genealogy conference.
Lisa Belleman, Director
of Membership and Social
Media for the East Tennessee Historical Society
told The Focus that anyone
wanting more information
can go to the History Fair
website at http://www.
easttnhistory.org/historyfair but they are welcome
to call 865-215-8824 or
email ETHS at [email protected]
are subject to publisher and editor approval. We want your news: that
is what makes this paper truly a community newspaper.
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newspaper is not responsible or liable whatsoever for any claim made
by an ad or for any of the services, products or opportunities offered
by our advertisers. We do not endorse or promote the purchase or
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August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
PAGE A3
Publisher’s Position
He’s Gone — Let’s move on
By Steve Hunley,
Publisher
[email protected]
The ballots in the recent
election had barely been
counted when the News
Sentinel started giving
the new Board of Education advice about how to
pick the next superintendent. The Sentinel told the
incoming Board members
just what to look for in a
new superintendent and
even rehashed a little history.
The Sentinel didn’t exactly get it right about the fact
that seven of the nine members on the new Board are
former teachers. When I
was a member of the Board
of Education, I was the ONLY
member who was a businessman amongst a sea of
former school administrators. Never once do I recall
the Sentinel editorializing
about the need for occupational diversity on the
Board back then. Eventually, the Board became so top
heavy with former administrators that a friend of mine
made the observation old
school administrators don’t
go to either Heaven or Hell
when they die; they get
themselves elected to the
Board of Education.
The Sentinel wrongly
puts the past two election
cycles in the context of a
“teacher revolt,” although
they were correct that the
former Board majority was
wiped out due to former
Superintendent Jim McIntyre. The teachers didn’t
elect any candidate to the
Board; McIntyre, with the
unfailing support of the
Chamber of Commerce and
the Knoxville News Sentinel, managed to turn the
great majority of people in
the community against him.
It also turned the voting
public against those members of the Board who were
perceived as rubber stamps
for McIntyre. If you’ve forgotten which candidates
those were, simply look in
the archives and see who
the Sentinel endorsed.
The Sentinel says McIntyre quit when it became
evident he had lost his
majority on the Board of
Education, which is true.
McIntyre blamed the “toxic
atmosphere” surrounding
his superintendency as
being one of the reasons
he was leaving, but what
neither he (nor the Sentinel) ever acknowledged,
was no one single person
had more to do with creating that toxic atmosphere
than McIntyre.
McIntyre quit about a
month after seeking yet
another four-year extension of his contract. McIntyre was mighty slow on the
uptake, which was one of
his many faults as a leader.
In a weird analogy, the Sentinel attempted to excuse
McIntyre’s “slight” teaching experience by comparing him to David Cutcliff’s lack of football playing experience. First of
all, that’s like comparing a
cricket to a stallion. Secondly, even saying McIntyre had “slight” teaching
experience is like saying
someone who looks at a lot
of postcards is a world traveler. The Sentinel, which
incidentally, opposed virtually every new member sitting on the Board of Education come September, is
now telling those folks just
what they need in a new
superintendent. The Sentinel says we need someone with “vision and passion,” both of which they
attributed to Jim McIntyre.
Basically, what the Sentinel is saying is the permanent superintendent
ought to be Jim McIntyre
2.0. The Sentinel says we
need a “top-notch administrator” (another trait they
used to attribute to McIntyre), yet they failed to recognize McIntyre was a terrible administrator. One
of McIntyre’s chief failings
was his tendency to rule
like a tyrant. McIntyre’s
style was dictatorial, autocratic and imperial. That is
one reason McIntyre never
connected with the people,
the teachers, or much of
anyone outside Knoxville’s
wealthy elite establishment.
Of course he got along with
the establishment as he
was handpicked by what
good ol’ Georgianna Vines
likes to call our “business
community leaders.”
The Sentinel ignores
the fact since Jim McIntyre’s departure, there has
been a collective exhaling
of breath. Buzz Thomas,
has done a good job. Yet
Thomas has had no difficulty in spotting those areas
where the school system
needed overhauling and
is methodically making
changes. I suppose the
Sentinel would contend
Buzz Thomas is merely
expanding upon the good
job done by McIntyre, which
is a fantasy. Buzz Thomas
has earned more good will
for the Knox County School
system in a month than
Jim McIntyre did in eight
years.
It seems to me the Sentinel is mighty free with its
advice, especially considering it was entirely wrong
about Jim McIntyre and I
would remind readers the
Sentinel died in the trenches with and for McIntyre.
The fact is Jim McIntyre was
not much of a leader and
the only thing more preposterous is McIntyre running
a leadership academy.
A superintendent needs
to understand as many
perspectives as possible,
including those of teachers, students, parents, and
taxpayers, a word you will
rarely ever find in a Sentinel
editorial when schools are
mentioned. The new Board
of Education doesn’t need
to be reminded it cannot
represent solely teachers; any Board member
who does not consider taxpayers, the folks who pay
the freight, the children,
the professional staff and
the community ought to
be replaced. If a Board
member represents the
teacher’s union instead of
the plain folks, he or she
ought to be sent packing
and likely will be in the next
election.
Nor does the Sentinel
need to remind the incoming Board members they
will be held accountable,
as that is precisely how
they got there. Despite
the Knoxville News Sentinel
and the Chamber of Commerce, the voters held the
McIntyre rubber stamps
accountable and now they
are gone and it is time to
move on.
The Chalk Board
Bits of News About Local Education
By Sally Absher
[email protected]
Inskip Elementary
Students Receive
School Supplies
Enrichment Federal Credit Union’s North
Knoxville Branch delivered school supplies to
Inskip Elementary School
to make sure all students
have the proper supplies
for a productive and educational school year. This is
the second year the credit
union has assisted Inskip
Elementary with supplies
for students. With the help
of EFCU members and the
community the credit union
was able to deliver 5 large
boxes of supplies to the
school.
Credit Unions were
founded on the philosophy
of “People Helping People”,
and this is just one small
way that EFCU can reach
out to our community and
provide a small level of
assistance. The employees at the North Knoxville
Branch, located at 5201
Schubert Road, felt a need
to help a school basically in
their back yard.
“If we can provide one
or two items to a child
to ensure they have the
proper supplies to assist
in their education, then we
have been able to assist
the future of our community in a positive manner,”
said EFCU North Branch include the following memManager Ellora Drinnen.
bers:
•
Theresa Nicholls,
Director of School Psychology Services, Tennessee
Tennessee
Department of Education
Department
•
Eileen Miller, Advoof Education
cate, Decoding Dyslexia
Announces
Tennessee
Dyslexia Advisory • Allison McAvoy,
Special Education Teacher,
Council
Hamilton County DepartLast week Education ment of Education
Commissioner Candice
•
Meli s s a Mill McQueen unveiled a roster er-Benson, Elementary
of education leaders and School Teacher, The Bodine
advocates to serve on the School
Dyslexia Advisory Council, a
•
Mercedes Chargroup designed to explore trand, Middle School Teachways to screen students er, Clarksville-Montgomery
for characteristics of dys- County School System
lexia and identify resources
•
Briana Patrick,
for teachers to support stu- High School Teacher, Laudents with the characteris- derdale County Schools
tics of dyslexia.
•
Anna Thorsen,
The advisory council was Parent
established as part of the
•
Morgan Ashworth,
Say Dyslexia Bill, which was Speech Language Patholoapproved by the Tennessee gist, Loudon County School
General Assembly during District
the 2016 legislative sesThe council also includes
sion. In addition to estab- three ex-officio members
lishing the Dyslexia Adviso- with expertise in dyslexry Council, the law requires ia: Emily Dempster with
all students to be screened the International Dyslexia
for the characteristics of Association; Erin Alexandyslexia and provide appro- der, a school psychologist
priate interventions for stu- and assistant director for
dents who are identified as clinical services at the Tenhaving those characteris- nessee Center for Dyslextics. The bill also requires ia; and Susan Porter, a disthe Department to provide trict lead coach of instructraining on identifying and tion with Metro Nashville
addressing dyslexia.
Public Schools.
The advisory council will
R&R
Buildings
Buy or Rent to Own
Storage Buildings,
Carports, Garages and
Barns
865-567-5835
Area Student
Scholarships
Announced
Three Carter High School
graduates (above) received
this year’s Andy Wilson
Memorial Scholarship:
Shelby Reynolds, daughter
of Carrie and Jeremy Reynolds; Daylon Hurst, daughter of James and Angie
Hurst; and Austin Harbin,
son of Jeff and Kim Harbin.
All three are freshmen at
Carson Newman College
this fall.
The scholarships are
awarded each year to a
male and female who have
maintained a 3.0 grade
point average and have
participated in sports in
some capacity. Andy’s
family has already awarded over $60,000 in scholarships since Andy’s death.
Andy was tragically killed in
a car accident on January
26, 2008. He is the son
of Becky Wilson and the
late Roger Wilson and the
grandson of Bill and Peggy
Wilson.
Also, Seymour High
School graduate Dailyn
Davis (pictured below)
received the Dolly Parton
Scholarship in the amount
of $15,000 from Citizens
National Bank and The
Dollywood Foundation.
Dailyn is the daughter of
Dale and Kim Davis of Seymour. She will be attending
the University of Tennessee
in Knoxville to pursue her
Bachelor of Science degree
in Kinesiology.
“We congratulate Dailyn
and wish her great success as she begins her college career at UT,” says
Chuck Godfrey, Assistant
Vice President and Branch
Manager of CNB’s Seymour
Branch located at 10225
Chapman Highway.
PAGE A4
County Commission
The Knoxville Focus
August 15, 2016
Tax Break for Pryor Brown Garage on County Agenda
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
A $2.7 million dollar tax
increment financing (TIF)
plan for the renovation of the
old Pryor Brown Garage on
Market and Clinch downtown
is before the working session
of the Knox County Commission tonight.
The skeleton of the former
building is being considered
for 30 residential apartments
and retail store locations by
developers Rick Dover and
Kelly Conley and the TIF
approval may be crucial for
the deal to take place.
The garage was built in
the early 1920s and said to
be possibly the oldest parking garage in the nation. The
structure has been neglected and suffered a roof collapse. Owners of the facility
requested demolition of the
garage earlier but that was
rejected.
Dover and Conley are planning to put more than $9 million into renovating and converting the structure and
Deputy Mayor Bill Lyons has
assured the county commission that the TIF is necessary
for the project to happen.
Dover is known for his
renovation and use of several historic buildings in the
area including current work
at Old Knoxville High School
and the Farragut Hotel downtown.
Since the garage is
located downtown and sub- Harris and Karen Carson
The group may also con- 2 Homeland Security Planject to both city and county who are leaving their seats sider funding the county’s ner for 15 counties, may
taxes both jurisdictions are at the Board of Education.
part of resurfacing Corry- also be approved. The idea
required to approve any tax
Cortney Piper may also be ton Road from Washington is to fund the program and
break.
approved for appointment to Pike to the county line, resur- enhance local and regional
The commission may also the Visit Knoxville board and facing East End Road from first responders to disasters
discuss an agreement with a yet-unnamed person may Thorngrove Pike to Asheville and requires no matching
Rural/Metro Corporation to be named to complete the Highway, and Tipton Station local funds.
continue funding fire safety unfulfilled term of Jim Jen- Road from Martin Mill Pike to
An agreement with Ijams
positions, and adopting the nings as a member of the Chapman Highway.
Nature Center to provide eduNorthwest Sector Plan.
Sheriff’s Office Merit System
A Homeland Security grant cation and outreach may be
Commissioner Dave Council.
for William Cole, the District funded for about $40,000.
Wright announced
the commissioners will also honor
the four members
leaving that body:
Among the 49 items on the Knox County
So, what is a Gaga Pit?
Sam McKenzie, Amy
Commission’s work session agenda today
Gaga Ball is a variant of dodgeball and
Broyles, Jeff Ownby
are several school system requests. The uses only one ball. The game combines
and Mike Brown. He
school system’s requests normally go dodging, striking, running, and jumping, with
also plans to honor
through without any discussion and are the object of being the last person standing.
Tracy Sanger, Doug
voted on as “consent” items.
Players hit the ball at each other with their
One of those school system requests hands, and are eliminated if the ball strikes
reads: Consideration of a Resolution of the them on or below the knee.
Commission of Knox County, Tennessee,
The game is played by a group of individapproving a request from Cedar Bluff Middle ual players or with teams, as well as in oneSchool to receive donated materials and on-one matches.
labor from The Church of Knoxville with the
The word “Gaga” comes from the Hebrew
approximate value of $550 for the instal- language meaning touch-touch. The game is
lation of a Gaga Pit at the paved outdoor played in a Gaga Pit and many children learn
City Councilman Daniel Brown, who
area.”
to play the game while in summer camps.
confirmed the offer to The Focus last
While the request will no doubt pass withThe pit is a structure with eight sides, low
week. Brown served as mayor briefly
out a discussion there’s little chance the walls, and one or two entrances. Often the
when Mayor Bill Haslam was electcommissioners really know what a Gaga pits have a sand floor. ed governor prior to Mayor Madeline
Pit is.
Rogero’s election.
Also mentioned is Rick Staples,
active in the 100 Black Men of Knoxville and former candidate for county
commission. Staples has also confirmed he has been contacted and is
actively seeking the position.
Rep. Armstrong’s wife, LaTonia, is
also being mentioned as a possible
candidate.
Other names may also come forth
as supporters of these and other
people are active in the upcoming
selection. Whomever the Democrats
name will apparently be elected in
the heavily Democratic district that
encompasses the downtown and
nearby area.
Local Democrats have until September 29 to name a candidate.
Democrats to pick
Armstrong replacement
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
Knox County Democrats will
assemble at their Morgan Street
Headquarters on Thursday to select
a ballot replacement for Rep. Joe
Armstrong. Armstrong was convicted
recently on tax evasion and, according to state law, cannot serve as the
16th District state legislator.
Party Chairman Cameron Brooks
has called a meeting of the district’s
Board of Governors, made up of district Democratic Party officials and
precinct captains. Brooks said a polling of those officials will take place
at the 6 p.m. meeting and a candidate selected.
Whoever is selected as the Democrat candidate will face Independent
Pete Drew on the November General Election ballot. The Republicans
did not offer a primary candidate
against Armstrong.
Several names have been suggested by district official including that of
Settlement agreement approved
with injured Inskip principal
Continued from page 1
Schools to the Law Director says,
“Whereas Elisa C. Luna sustained
personal injury caused by a violent criminal act in the course of
her employment with Knox County
Schools and whereas the Knox
County Board of Education does not
have workers compensation coverage suitable to Mr. Luna’s claim.
Whereas T.C.A. 49-714 requires the
Knox County Board of Education in
certain specific instances to provide
benefits comparable to a workers
compensation program, upon injury
from a violent criminal act.”
“Whereas the Knox County Board
of Education desires to authorize the
Knox County Law Director to negotiate benefits on behalf of Elisa C.
Luna,” is the language of the resolution.
Ms. Luna is the former Inskip Elementary principal who was severely wounded by a fired teacher. She
and assistant principal Amy Brace
were shot in 2010 after a school
teacher, Mark S. Foster, was fired
and returned to the school to injure
both of the administrators.
Both women are credited with
pulling the failing school up to meet
better standards. Luna is the daughter of former State Senator Jerry
Cooper and Brace is the sister of
David Brace, the former city’s Deputy
Director of Public Service.
Consider the months of recovery
for Luna and Brace. Luna was in critical condition following the shooting.
Brace survived her wounds and has
served as principal of Lonsdale Elementary School. This year she was
named principal of Sarah Moore
Green Academy.
Recovery for Luna brought her to
the point of being wheelchair bound
but she returned to the school to
resume her duties, recovering much
better than expected. Luna had been
honored as Principal of the Year and
recognized for her successful efforts
at Inskip.
In 2011 a state-wide award to
outstanding principals was named
for Mrs. Luna. That year both Luna
and Brace received their Doctorate
in Education in Leadership Services from the University of Tennessee. She later launched a fundraising campaign for the Patricia Neal
Rehabilitation Center.
Luna began with the school system
as a special education teacher at
Green Magnet School, worked as
the curriculum Generalist at Sarah
Moore Green Academy, Assistant
Principal at Sarah Moore and served
more than 9 years as Principal at
Inskip Elementary.
In 2014 she was named Principal
Support Specialist and Community
Schools Liaison. She apparently continued to recover from her wounds,
handling her duties from her wheelchair. Knox County Interim Superintendent Buzz Thomas told The Focus
last week that Mrs. Luna remained on
the roll as a school system employee
until June 30th.
The Knoxville Focus learned last
week that a settlement has been
reached with an agreement in Circuit Court. Mrs. Luna will receive a
lump-sum settlement of $76,100
and $11,450 in past sick leave she
had accumulated when she was
injured. The school system will pay
her $693.65 per week until she
reaches retirement age. The court
agreement also specifies that the
county school system will continue to
pay for her future “reasonable” medical care expenses for the remainder
of her life.
Law Director Bud Armstrong said
that with the monthly payment, comparable to “workers compensation”
that Mrs. Luna would also draw from
Social Security Disability and her
Tennessee Teacher’s disability and
that should be comparable to what
she would be earning in salary were
she to still be employed.
What is a Gaga Pit?
August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
PAGE B1
August 15, 2016
Our Neighborhoods
Bow Wow in the Park
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
If you’ve recently moved
to Knox County or if you
just got your first dog you
may be wondering where
you can take it and let it
play. If you’re lucky enough
to have a fenced back yard
then you can at least let the
animal loose there.
House animals need to
be outdoors at least part
of the time and that’s especially true for dogs. They are
curious and active beings
that like to roam and venture. Even if you have a
fenced yard you will learn
that dogs also like to play
with their owners and other
dogs.
“No person owning or
having possession, charge,
care, custody or control of
any animal shall cause,
permit or allow the animal
to stray or in any manner to
run at large in or upon any
public street, sidewalk or
park or upon the property
of another.”
That’s the law in Knox
County.
So, where is there in our
area that permits active
play and lets dogs run without a leash?
How about a public park
with large, fenced-in open
spaces for dogs and benches for owners? Interested?
Knoxville and Knox
County have seven Dog
Parks that feature the open
spaces where your dog
can run and water fountains and benches for you.
Some even have separate
areas for small and large
breeds and all but one of
these canine-friendly parks
are within existing people
parks except one.
Tommy Shumpert Dog
Park is located in North
Knox County next to the
Sterchi Hills subdivisions.
The section of the large
park reserved for dogs
has two fenced sections.
The large dog area has a
mulched walking trail and
a large pond with a dock
where your dog can swim.
The main park has a walking trail where you can
walk your leashed dog and
the trail connects with the
Sterchi Hills Greenway.
Victor Ashe Park is located between Pleasant
Ridge Road and Western
Avenue. The park is just
off Bradshaw Road. It features one acre with hardwood trees and your dog
can enjoy ramps, tunnels
and jumps there. On leash
you and your pet can enjoy
the 120 acres there along a
1.5 mile natural trail.
PetSafe Village Dog Park,
Knoxville’s first such park,
is a one-acre space that is
on-leash but also has offleash hours in the evenings
when the park is staffed.
The park has a natural
pond, a full set of agility
equipment, walking trails
and picnic tables. The facility is located off Dutchtown
Road, on Cogdill Road.
Concord Park has one
of the newest dog parks in
the area. The dog area has
almost four acres and features a dock with access
to the water plus a dog
shower. Paved and natural surface walking areas
invite you to bring your pet.
The park is located behind
the tennis courts by the
Concord Mountain Bike
Trails.
The PetSafe Charter
Doyle Dog Park is located
on West Millertown Pike off
Chapman Highway. It has
two areas for large and
small dogs. There are also
trails for on-leash walking.
The PetSafe Downtown
Dog Park is primarily for
downtown dog owners and
their pets. It also has two
sections for large or small
dogs, water fountains for
both you and your dog, and
a variety of fun play stations. It is located at 200
South Central.
Holston River’s Dog Park
is located at 3300 Holston
Hills and features a one-
acre dog area and two sections for the size of the
dogs. You can leash your
pet and enjoy a walk along
the river as it winds its way
along the park.
All the parks have dog
waste stations and a courteous pet owner should
always clean up after their
pets. All of the Knoxville
and Knox County Parks
and Greenways are open
to leashed dogs. The
Tennessee Izaak Walton
League has partnered with
the parks to place the waste
stations here and there as
needed. You can sponsor
a waste station by calling
the League at (865)4145590.
PetSafe is a subsidiary of
Radio Systems Corporation
off Cogdill Road at 1-427
PetSafe Way. The corporation is the largest manufacturer of electronic pet
training products in the
nation and has sales in 52
countries. They manufacture a variety of products
including invisible fencing, pet drinking fountains,
Premier Pet Products and
Innotek training products.
In Knox County the corporation has partnered with
the city, county, and other
concerns to fund the dog
parks.
PetSafe supports not
Photo by Mike Steely
Beth-Ann McDonald pauses at the entrance to the PetSafe
Dog Park at Tommy Shumpert Park with her two year old
daughter Callie Grace and Jaya, their mixed breed Lab.
The new pet owner visits the park often and it’s a great
break for exercise and fitness for all three.
only dog parks but rescue
missions, adoption services and many other efforts.
Employees at PetSafe may
bring their dogs to work
with them.
In 2011 Dog Fancy
Magazine named Knoxville
the “Dog Town USA City” for
the Southeast.
Allied Services Unlimited provides solutions
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
Don Burke of Allied Services Unlimited.
Don Burke is a man with a great sense
for innovation and cutting edge technologgy. He has 40 years of diverse business
experience, but the most significant times
in his career were connected with his work
in a biotechnological company dealing
with hydrocarbons treatment. Recently
he has started a new endeavor - a company, which is also connected with environmental protection.
Burke has never had professional education in the field of biotechnology and
remediation, but has always been quick
to learn and grasp the latest trends in
technology. His business career started in
Alaska. “Part of the success in business
comes when you meet the right people
at the right time,” said Burke. His business thrill and entrepreneurial spirit have
always helped him in his work.
In Anchorage he started a firm called
Biotech Services Inc., which specialized
in cleaning oil spills. Together with colleagues from Europe, he managed to
bring to the United States bacteria, which
were aimed at cleaning areas polluted
with petroleum and was harmless to the
environment. This technology made him
known in the business.
The business career of Don Burke
spreads from Alaska to California. Now
he lives in Knoxville, where he moved in
1998. His entrepreneurial spirit always
made him dream of new business projects. He started with a small tree cutting firm and was happy to help people in
the neighborhood. However, after restoring his ties with a business partner from
Europe, he decided to set up a company,
Allied Services Unlimited.
Burke’s company primarily deals with
Continue on page 2
The Knoxville Focus
PAGE B2
August 15, 2016
Working hard to please City looks to regulate
I’ve become a
writing up orders
millennial! It hapand answering
pened without
customers’ quesmy knowing what
tions and comwas happening.
plaints. Oil techs
My reason for
and mechanics
saying this is that
work tirelessly to
I’m changing part
provide services
time jobs again.
that please cusAfter almost a By Joe Rector
tomers and to
year at Toyota of [email protected] diagnose and fix
Knoxville, my body is aching problems with vehicles. The
from the walking on concrete mechanics attend classes
all day long. If I could survive to earn certification in multhat one thing, no change tiple areas. A car owner can
would be necessary. My time feel a bit more at ease that
at the place has certainly his or her car is under the
showed me that the service care of someone who has
department employees work the experience and skills to
hard to please.
solve problems.
Nothing is any better than
I worked as a porter, a
getting reacquainted with a fancy name for a car mover.
best friend. Billy Hayes is the My buddies and I began work
Director of Service at Toyota around 7 a.m. and worked
of Knoxville, and as I’ve dis- long hours. The job doesn’t
cussed many times before, sound that difficult, does
we coached our sons in base- it? You’re right…to a degree.
ball for years and developed However, porters move cars
a strong friendship through it. to different areas of the propThe best part of my job there erty for work, then they move
was spending time with him them to the car wash, and
as we laughed, fussed, and then they bring them out for
sometimes cussed.
waiting customers. By the
I knew Billy was a good end of the day, a porter who
body shop business man. works hard can walk as much
What I witnessed firsthand is as twelve miles without ever
that he simply has exception- leaving the Toyota lot.
al skills that make him one
Another surprise conof the strongest business cerned customers. Many are
leaders around. He works to kind folks who are patient
keep employees happy. He is with the staff and find ways
a member of management, to occupy themselves as
but Billy is never afraid to services are being completjump in to help porters, ser- ed. An astonishing number
vice advisers, or body shop of customers arrive at the
technicians. On more than center in a bad mood, and
one occasion, he’s rolled up that negative attitude grows
his white shirt sleeves and while they wait. I’ve watched
fixed a vehicle problem.
too many people verbally
I also learned that the attack employees over profolks who work in the service longed waiting time, even
center are some of the hard- though the vast majority
est working individuals in any of complainers didn’t have
business. Service advisers appointments. Some irate
spend much of their time individuals accuse workers
of stealing possessions in
their cars and maintain those
accusatory tones even after
video proof contradicts their
statements.
Dealerships are driven by
surveys. Called CSI’s (customer service index), these
surveys are sent to folks who
have visited the dealership
for service. The kicker with
these tools is that they aren’t
fair at all. If a person finishes his visit at the center,
thinks he’s received average
service, and gives a score
in the 70’s or 80’s, he has
unwittingly assigned a failing
score. Anything below a 90
is a terrible grade, and most
of the time, an acceptable
CSI score to management in
the company is 100. Try to
remember that the next time
you grade a dealership’s service department.
I know that mistakes
happen when car services
are provided. That comes
when humans are working.
However, a customer who
loses his temper is making
a bad situation worse. A
better approach would be to
talk with the service department manager and to come
to some kind of understanding. Maybe a better solution
would be for the customer to
go to a different dealer.
All in all, I’ve gained a
healthy respect for the folks
who take care of cars. They
work hard and try to provide
excellent service. From now
on, I’ll be much more patient
and understanding of what is
going on at the places where
I shop. As for the workers in
the Toyota of Knoxville service center, I salute them
and the work they do and say
thanks for your kindness to
me. I’ll miss you guys.
Short Term Rentals
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
The City of Knoxville is floating plans
to regulate short-term, Airbnb-type
rentals of homes and began that effort
Wednesday in a presentation before the
Neighborhood Advisory Council.
The city administration had three
representatives at the meeting and Bill
Lyons, Deputy Mayor, opened the presentation by saying they want to include
the neighborhoods in the process.
“They are operating here now,” Lyons
said of the short-term rentals, “completely outside regulations.” He said the
city is looking at regulating the rentals in
a manner similar to the food truck regulations, in order to control where they
might operate and what taxes, licenses
and permits would be required.
He said the city is just in the beginning
stages of getting public input to “come
up with the best possible ordinance.”
Short-term rentals would probably
include renting of rooms in a house,
the entire house, outside dwellings on
a property and even garage apartments.
Knoxville is seeing a growing number of
this type of rentals as people come to
the city for special and sporting events,
conventions, etc. The cost to visitors
for a few days of occupancy in private
homes is often much less than renting
a hotel or motel room.
Currently unregulated, there is no standard as to what can be rented or where
the rentals can take place. There’s also
the loss of revenue to not only the commercial lodging facilities but to city tax
coffers.
Christa Cuccaro of the City Law
Department went through a PowerPoint
presentation with the neighborhood representatives to illustrate possible ways
to regulate the rentals. She said that the
rentals to non-residents can also pose
parking and public safety problems in
neighborhoods. She also said the city
is looking to see how short-term rentals
might affect affordable housing.
Cuccaro separated the short-term rentals from traditional Bed and Breakfast
homes and Boarding Houses. She said
that last year some 8,000 visitors stayed
in short-term rentals in the city.
The city is looking to similar regulations adopted in other cities, including
Nashville and Asheville, N.C., and may
limit the Knoxville rentals to owner occupied residential homes, prohibiting commercial firms who rent several houses
from the service.
She also said that the city may hire
an employee to enforce whatever regulations are adopted by the city council. Another idea to regulate the housing
might be an annual questionnaire
required from those homeowners. The
city is also looking to require insurance,
a business license, a plan for parking at
the rentals, and a special permit.
The short-term housing permit,
Cuccaro suggested, might cost $100
per year and then be reduced in following years. She also suggested that the
rentals should be regulated in areas
zoned strictly for residential housing.
The city plans several public hearings
on the issue and a city council work
session before the plans are adopted.
The city is also proposing imposing the
hotel-motel occupancy tax on the private
home rentals.
Lyons, Cuccaro and Jesse Mayfield,
Director of Communications, took several questions and comments during
the meeting including comments that
the $100 fee might be too large or too
small, how it could be enforced, how
many occupants would be permitted
in each rental, and one comment that
residential neighborhoods should be
banned from such rentals.
Commenting on the proposal to regulate the short-term rentals Lyons said,
“The only other option is to ignore it.”
Allied Services Unlimited
provides solutions
2.48 ACRES & 2,400+ SF HOME. Spacious, well maintained
home all on one level. Large family room, county size kitchen
with eat-in area and a formal dinning room, large walk-in
closet in the master, over-sized guest room with huge walkin 2 head shower and its own entrance. 3BR 3BA home with
2.46 acres of land with a 4 bay utility pole shed with slightly
rolling land. Just a short drive to Knox, Maryville or Seymour.
MLS 958533 $230,000
LAKE COMMUNITY. This spectacular home is located on a
prime lot that features 0.85 acres. The home offers an open
floor plan that lends itself to entertaining family and friends,
all on one level. Spacious kitchen area offers raised bar. 4 spacious BRs, 3 full BAs, cathedral ceiling, new carpet, hardwood
floors, awesome family room stone fireplace gas logs, large
laundry room with 3 car garage and tons of storage. Cozy
back deck leads out to a great back yard for family cookouts.
MLS 967358 $305,000
KAREN TERRY
Cell: 865-789-2180
www.tnhomesbykaren.com
865-977-0770
521 W Lamar Alexander Pkwy
Maryville TN 37801
Each Keller Williams office is independently
owned and operated
COZY HOME WITH ACREAGE. Cozy Ranch home with 2.55 of
beautiful country view, the home offers 2 bedrooms 1 bath.
Updated HVAC, windows, vinyl siding. Large outer shed.
Great place for a garden , no restriction, possible mini farm,
has well on property but connected to public, large walk
down cellar. Buyer to verify all. MLS 929039 $68,900
SELLING HOMES IN TENNESSEE
Cont. from page 1
mold inspection and remediation, provides asbestos cleaning and other
environmental services.
The fluids used to kill the
organisms causing mold
are harmless for people!
The second division of
the firm is connected with
cleaning asbestos contaminated areas.
Burke is proud of his A
Plus rating with the Better
Business Bureau and says
that much of his business
comes from referrals either
by word of mouth or the
One Call Club.
“We’re unique because
we provide good service,
reliability, courtesy and
punctuality,” Burke says.
He stresses that the technologies he uses are cutting edge and are tested
abroad, but are undisclosed and are not available to the majority of
companies.
Burke’s company is fully
certified for mold inspection and remediation.
Besides, the firm provides
environmental consulting
services, expert evaluation of polluted areas, etc.
Tree cutting services are
not a priority anymore, but
Burke still helps people out
by clearing their driveway
or just cutting a dangerous
tree when his services are
needed.
Allied Services Unlimited
is licensed and insured.
You can contact Don
Burke at (865) 388-3634
or (865) 859-0541. More
information about the firm
may be found on its official
website www.allied-servicesunlimited.com. You
can also find some details
about the firm online on the
Facebook page of the company at http://m.facebook.
com/alliedservicesunlim/.
August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
The Other “Boss”
PAGE B3
Hilary Howse of Nashville
Pages from the Past
By Ray Hill
[email protected]
When one thinks of bossism in Tennessee politics,
Edward Hull Crump of
Memphis leaps to mind.
Much has been written
about the Crump machine,
but Hilary Howse of
Nashville headed an equally potent and thriving political machine in Davidson
County.
There are numerous similarities between the two
urban political machines.
Like Crump, Howse was
colorful and larger than life;
but unlike Crump, Howse
did not prefer working
behind the scenes. Howse
was Mayor of Nashville
from 1909 until 1915.
Driven from office in 1915
when the business establishment exerted control
over Nashville’s city government, Hilary Howse bided
his time. He intended to
wage a successful comeback and expand his political machine.
Born in 1866 near
Mur freesboro, Howse
moved to Nashville in 1884
and by the turn of the century owned a successful business in partnership with his
brother Kai. Deeply interested in local politics, Hilary
Howse climbed the ladder,
winning election to the
Davidson County Court and
eventually the Tennessee
State Senate.
Howse campaigned for
mayor in 1909, promising
quite openly that he would
ignore state law requiring
the closure of saloons. Not
surprisingly, Howse was well
funded by the liquor interests. Howse was hardly
secretive about his views;
according to Don Doyle of
Vanderbilt University, the
mayor, when asked if he
protected saloons from the
existing prohibition laws,
loudly exclaimed, “Protect
them? I do better than that.
I patronize ‘em.”
Like Crump in Memphis,
Hilary Howse understood
the importance of black
voters. Howse recognized a black vote counted every bit as much as a
white vote at a time when
it was considered heresy
for Democratic politicians
to seek the votes of African
- Americans. Indeed, the
Democratic primary was
frequently considered the
“white man’s primary”.
Howse actively courted
black votes and when he
sought reelection as mayor
in 1911, he slated Solomon
P. Harris to run with him.
Harris was the first African
– American to serve on
Nashville’s City Council
since the early 1880s,
according to Don Doyle.
Again, like the Memphis
machine, Mayor Hilary
Howse extended services
to the black community,
providing a park, a hospital,
a library and schools for the
African – American community. The Howse machine
incorporated many of the
poorer citizens and when
someone was in need, the
machine responded with
coal to keep homes warm.
When families were hungry,
the Howse machine delivered food. Those voters
remembered Hilary Howse
at election time and supported the mayor and his
favored candidates.
The poll tax was designed
to keep the illiterate, the
poor and working class
citizens from voting in
elections. The “better” elements and businessmen
felt that elections should
be the private preserve of
their own class. The poll tax
would provide a more intelligent class of voter.
The urban machines run
by E. H. Crump and Hilary
Howse destroyed that
notion by collecting large
campaign chests and part
of that money was used to
pay the poll taxes of loyal,
albeit poor, voters. Those
same loyal followers were
rewarded with favors and
jobs.
Naturally, the business
elite found Hilary Howse
not only common, but also
a genuine threat to what
they perceived to be “good
government”. In 1913 they
struck back, proposing a
commission form of government, which was supposed
to remove “politics” from
local government. Much to
their dismay, Hilary Howse
won a third term as mayor
that same year.
The business leaders
tried another avenue to
drive Howse out of office,
pouncing on a financial
scandal brought about by
grafters inside the mayor’s
administration. Business
leaders were also becoming increasingly alarmed
by Nashville’s burgeoning
debt. To their collective
horror, Mayor Howse proposed to increase that debt
when he proposed a massive bond issue in 1915.
The businessmen demanded Nashville’s books be
audited by an independent
auditor, a notion the mayor
resisted. Finally, having no
choice, Howse agreed to
allow an auditor to go over
the city’s books after the
businessmen had agreed
to pay all the costs of the
audit.
As the auditor boarded a train headed toward
Nashville, Mayor Howse
reluctantly confessed
some of the accounting records and ledgers
were inexplicably missing.
Some said Howse had sent
the records to the bottom
of the Cumberland River;
others claimed the possibly incriminating record
books had been incinerated. Whatever their eventual fate, they were most
certainly missing.
Infuriated, businessmen demanded Howse be
removed from office. The
mayor adamantly insisted
he was completely innocent
of any wrongdoing. Still,
the pressure and outcry by
citizens caused Howse to
Photo courtesy of the Tennessee State Library & Archives, from the author’s personal collection.
Mayor Hilary Howse of Nashville.
surrender his office by the
end of July of 1915.
Howse caused a sensation when he appeared at
the judicial hearing for the
ouster suit and demanded
to be put on the witness
stand. Howse freely admitted he had purchased liquor
in supposedly dry Nashville,
which positively shocked
prosecutors. The admission should have been
damaging, but it took the
wind out of the sails of his
opponents.
Fully in control of the city
government, the business
leaders reigned supreme
until 1923. Even with politics supposedly removed
from Nashville government,
there was bitter factionalism and little real leadership. Voters grew restive
and nobody was more
aware of that fact than
Hilary Howse.
Howse’s absence from
the mayor’s office was well
spent; he found the time to
marry Jennie May Wheeler.
For the rest of his life,
Howse was prone to say,
“The best thing I ever did
in my life was when I got
married.”
Hilary Howse also took
the time to reinvent himself politically.
Renouncing his drinking
and carousing, Howse presented himself as a sober,
serious leader fully capable
of running the local government. His reputation was
further burnished by the
fact a grand jury looking
into the case of the missing ledgers had exonerated
him. He also campaigned
as, of all things, a reformer,
much to the fury of business
leaders and the Chamber of
Commerce.
In spite of determined
opposition from business
leaders and the Chamber
of Commerce, Hilary Howse
made a triumphant return
as mayor in 1923. Howse
would remake his machine
and it would become stronger than ever. Howse would
remain as mayor until he
died in office.
Howse’s political resurrection was aided by strong
support from many newly
enfranchised women voters
who liked the story of the
former mayor’s redemption,
as well as his devotion to his
wife. Women flocked to the
polls in droves to cast their
ballots for Hilary Howse in
1923.
Once again installed as
mayor, Howse returned to
his program of bigger government and expanding
social services for the working class and the poor. And
despite his claims of having
reformed his own ways,
Nashville was a booming place for businesses,
legal and illegal. Gambling
establishments operated
without interference from
local law enforcement and
bootlegging abounded.
The average voter cared
less about the mayor’s
questionable personal and
political morality than his
progressive program of
building hospitals, clearing
out slums, and improving
health care for citizens.
The tottering instability
of local government during
the reign of the Chamber of
Commerce rule in Nashville
all but evaporated when
Hilary Howse returned to
office. There was no lack
of leadership and Nashville
grew rapidly during the first
several years of Howse’s
administration. Nashville
grew in part due to Howse
annexing some neighborhoods into the city; other,
more wealthy suburbs he
avoided for obvious political
reasons. Hilary Howse did
not propose to add more
Chamber of Commerce
adherents to the voter
rolls.
Mayor Howse allied himself with the Crump machine
in some statewide races.
When Governor Austin
Peay distributed state
money in the rural counties, with the urban counties bearing the brunt of the
taxation, Howse objected
loudly. Howse and Crump
supported the gubernatorial
candidacy of State Treasurer
Hill McAlister against
Governor Peay in 1926.
McAlister fared well and
ran strong in Tennessee’s
more urban areas, but
Peay won heavy majorities
in rural Tennessee, barely
surviving the challenge.
Peay died the next year and
was succeeded by Henry
H. Horton, Speaker of the
State Senate.
Horton continued many
of Peay’s policies, in spite
of being himself a rural
Tennessean. The power
in the Horton administration was Luke Lea, former
U. S. senator and publisher
and owner of the Nashville
Tennessean. Howse and
Crump once again joined
hands to support McAlister
in 1928 when they unsuccessfully tried to dislodge
Horton when he sought a
term in his own right. Once
again, the primary election was very close and
McAlister won huge majorities in Davidson and Shelby
Counties.
Unable to elect their
man to the governorship,
they grudgingly made an
uneasy truce with the
Horton administration following the 1928 election.
Neither Mayor Howse nor
E. H. Crump supported a
candidate to oppose Henry
Horton in 1930, but the
governor was politically and
personally destroyed with
the failure of Caldwell and
Company.
Caldwell and Company
was the largest bank in the
South and held almost $7
million in deposits from the
State of Tennessee. Rogers
Caldwell was a personal
friend and business partner of Colonel Luke Lea.
Caldwell and Company was
considered “too big to fail”
and when it closed its doors
just after the 1930 general election, the impact was
devastating and instantaneous. It caused other
banks in Tennessee to fail,
frightened depositors who
hurried to withdraw their
own savings and further
imperiled the stability of
many more banks.
The urban machines
roared back to life; Crump
and Mayor Howse called
for and supported the
impeachment of Governor
Horton. The governor was
beset with troubles on all
sides and only through the
most brutal use of his office
and powers was Henry
Horton to narrowly escape
being impeached. Horton
could have run for another term in 1932, but chose
not to, realizing he could not
be nominated again. Luke
Lea’s publishing empire
came crumbling down and
he eventually found himself
confined to a North Carolina
penitentiary.
The Great Depression did
not diminish the popularity of Mayor Hilary Howse.
Howse avidly sought federal help for Nashville
and Tennessee’s senior
U. S. senator, Kenneth D.
McKellar, delivered results
for Tennessee. During
the first eighteen months
of the New Deal, some
$300,000,000 poured
into Tennessee. Howse
continued his expansion of
Nashville. It should come
as no surprise Mayor Howse
was a strong supporter of
Senator McKellar.
Shortly before his death,
Howse said in an interview,
“There’s nothing in the world
in politics except to serve
the people. The people will
deal with you exactly as you
deal with them. If you are
honest and straight and
clean and truthful with the
people, they’ll be honest
and straight and clean and
truthful with you.”
Mayor Howse admitted
he was well off financially,
but was quick to point to his
furniture business in downtown Nashville.
“No man can live in politics except to lose money
by doing it,” Howse opined.
“I’ve made a lot of money
since I’ve been here, but
I couldn’t have done what
I’ve done unless I’d been in
business.”
The machine headed by
Hilary Howse in Davidson
County was formidable.
Howse only lost one mayoral election in his long career
and occupied the office for
an astonishing twenty-one
years. Unlike the Crump
machine in Memphis, the
Howse machine did not
control every aspect of
Davidson County’s own politics, but it quite nearly did.
Hilary Howse began ailing
before the New Year arrived
in 1938. Seventy-one years
old, Mayor Howse was taken
to the hospital complaining about an aching stomach. His illness was publicly
referred to as an “intestinal disorder,” but Howse
soon developed pneumonia. He died around noon
on January 2, 1938.
The whiff of scandal
and corruption was never
far from Hilary Howse, but
he remained highly popular with the people of
Nashville.
Like the Crump machine
in Memphis, the machine
so carefully built by Hilary
Howse did not long survive
him.
The Knoxville Focus
PAGE B4
No notice on ethics meeting cancellation
By Mike Steely
[email protected]
Suppose a county group
was scheduled to meet,
people showed up, but the
group’s members didn’t?
That’s what happened
Tuesday morning at 8:30 at
the City-County Building.
The quarterly meeting
of the Knox County Ethics
Committee was on the
county’s website, on the
CTV schedule, and on the
electronic sign inside the
building. But when the time
came for the meeting, with
four citizens present to
speak to the members, no
members or county officials
showed up.
Some of the citizens
wanted to speak about the
new rules involving how
an ethical violation complaint is processed. The
rule change makes it a bit
harder to have a complaint
heard publically by the
Ethics members. A complaint that comes to the
county involving unethical
behavior of an official or
county employee now goes
to the Law Department for
review. If the complaint is
judged to have some merit
it goes then to the Ethics
Committee.
O nc e
t he
Et hic s
Committee hears the issue
in a public hearing a ruling
can be made but that goes
back to the Law Department
for consideration.
David Buuck, Chief
Deputy Law Director, told
The Focus that the committee meeting was cancelled
because there was nothing
on the agenda. He apologized for not informing The
Focus of the cancellation
and said there have been
no ethical complaints filed
or considered during the
past three months.
Michael Sullivan and
his attorney, Van. R. Irion,
were at the empty assembly room for the meeting
apparently to address the
new complaint procedures.
Sullivan has sued an animal
control officer and the Knox
County Sheriff’s Office in
federal court and Sullivan
is charged with animal cruelty in local court.
Sullivan said he may
address the County
C o mmi s s i o n’s
Wo r k
Session this evening on the
issue. The new procedure
says that any complaint
filed that also involves litigation in court cannot be
heard until the court case
is resolved.
He also said that the
Fraud Hotline has “kind
of displaced” the Ethics
Committee’s role.
In the Sullivan case
Buuck said the county was
“hamstrung” and couldn’t
respond when only hearing
“one side of the story.”
Commissioner Mike
Brown, a non-voting member
of the Ethics Committee, is
leaving office and the new
commission will be naming
a commissioner to replace
him. Other members of the
Ethics Committee include
people appointed by the
Sheriff, the County Mayor,
a Commission appointee,
a liaison from the Sheriff’s
Department, and a mayor’s
liaison member.
The committee members currently are Barbara
Chandler, Raj Patel, B.
DeWitt Burleson, Mae
Killebrew-Mosley, Bob
Barker, Gina Oster, Roy
Kruse, Garrett Swartwood
and Jonathan Cooper. Nonvoting members include
Capt. James Carson and
Dean Rice.
All of the committee
members serve overlapping terms and none of the
terms expire this year. The
next expiration of terms is
in October of 2017.
It’s No. 76 for The Knisleys!
They moved
into the thoufrom
U ni o n
sands; and many
County
to
live across the
Knox County
country far from
in 1912 and
East Tennessee.
joined Fairview
It is a wellBaptist Church
known tradition
in C orr y ton,
for the entire
Tennessee. The
Knisley family to
Knisley family
worship togethBy Ralphine Major
began a long
er at Fairview
[email protected]
com
association
Baptist Church
with the church and com- during their annual family
munity. Since that time, reunion, which has been
there have been children, held the second weekend
grandchildren, or great- in August for 76 years!
grandchildren who have Though the original Knisley
continuously attended siblings have passed on,
Fairview Baptist. Today, the younger generations
the Knisley family numbers continue the reunions that
emphasize family, faith,
food, and fun! The familiar fish fries have been
modernized, according
to Carroll Bales. “But we
still have the iron kettles
that were used for over 50
years,” Carroll said.
Last year marked a
milestone with the Knisley
Family’s 75th reunion at
the Corryton Senior Center
where over 200 families
were represented! Deloris
Bales shared that the service at Fairview was truly
special with over four
pews filled with the Knisley
Family. Victory in Jesus, a
beloved hymn and favorite
of many family members
was sung in their honor.
This year the tradition continued with a gathering for
Reunion No. 76!!
What a wonderful way to
celebrate another year of
life---getting together on a
beautiful summer evening
with family, remembering those family members
who have passed on, and
attending church together on a Sunday morning.
Those original family members would be so proud of
the legacy they have left.
Family reunions — they are
truly the American way of
life! (To be continued.)
August 15, 2016
My Cats
Traditionally, historians
tend to think ancient Egypt
was the site of cat domestication, owing to the clear depictions of house cats in
Egyptian paintings about 3600 years ago. However, in
2004, a grave excavated in Cyprus, contained the skeletons, laid close together, of both a human and a cat,
estimated to be 9500 years old. Cats are revered by the
Muslims. According to myth in many cultures, cats have
multiple lives, mostly nine lives. The myth is attributed
to the natural suppleness and swiftness cats exhibit to
escape life-threatening situations.
And that’s certainly true of my cats. I do not let them
roam around outside, which they dearly love to do, so that
when I open a door, their swiftness is astronomical, like a
flash of light. But it doesn’t happen often and when it does,
I can tempt them inside with “cat treats.”
When I first got them about three years ago I thought
they were females. But I found out later they are one of
each and brother and sister. Their personalities are as
different as night and day. Miss Kitty is lovable, cuddly,
and sits by my side wherever I sit. When I get up to go into
another room, she goes right along with me. Mister Cat is
very independent, not caring where I’m at or what I’m up
to, as long as he’s fed. Once in a great while he will jump
on my lap and let me caress his cheeks and under his chin
for a few minutes like he’s doing me a big favor, not the
other way around.
It is said that cats sleep seventeen hours a day. Well,
it’s no wonder--all they do is eat, play and sleep. The seven
hours they’re awake, they are busy grooming their lovely
coats of fur. It is estimated that there are seventy-three
breeds of cats in the world. I can only surmise how full
Noah’s Ark must have been if there were seventy-three
breeds of males and females. Then again, seventy-three
breeds probably were not known in his time.
Cats are very intelligent. My cats know the meaning of
the word, “no” but “yes” is incomprehensible to them. They
can’t shake hands with their paws, or rollover, or do many
tricks that dogs do. However, if one has a lot of patience
and perseverance they can be taught some things.
I taught my cats not to come in my bedroom at night (If
I did, they would keep me awake all night). I keep the bedroom door closed. Miss Kitty, however, will try to sneak
into the room whenever she can. When they do manage
to sneak in, it’s cat treat time again. I buy cat toys for them
which they will play with for a few days, then they’ll ignore
them and want new toys again.
I love my cats although I could do without the cat hair.
They help keep my blood pressure down!
Thought for the day: “If one is going to live amicably with
a cat, and if both parties are going to get the best out of the
partnership, a good deal of patience and a certain amount
of discipline is necessary on both sides.” Philip Brown,
from “The Cat That Came In From The Cold”
Send comments to: [email protected] Thank you.
August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
PAGE C1
August 15, 2016
Football season kicks off with Jamboree
By Ken Lay
Area high school football
teams have had two long hot
weeks of preseason camp in
2016.
The hot weather stuck
around Thursday night but
camps officially came to an
end Thursday night as eight
area teams played the first
night of the Knoxville Orthopedic Clinic Kick-Off Classic at
Hardin Valley Academy.
The sultry night certainly didn’t dampen the spirits of local fans as the four
one-quarter games were
played before a near-capacity crowd.
“It’s been a long camp,”
Hardin Valley coach Wes Jones
said. “This was great for a lot
of our kids because this was
their first time to play in that
Friday night atmosphere.”
Austin-East head coach Jeff
Phillips agreed despite seeing
his squad manage just eight
yards of total offense in a 0-0
tie against Gibbs (which had
just 55 yards in 12 minutes).
“Any time you get a chance
to put on the game jerseys
and walk through the halls;
that’s a good thing,” said Phillips who will begin his fourth
season as coach at his alma
mater when the Roadrunners
open their 2016 campaign
at home Friday night against
Scott. “It’s good to get out
here and play in a game.
“It’s been a long summer for
all of us.”
In other games: Central 7,
Hardin Valley 7: Jones had to
like what he saw from the host
Hawks Thursday night.
HVA, which went 5-6 last
season, darted to an early
lead against the Bobcats
when Gavin Greens threw an
11-yard touchdown pass to
Thomas Clay.
For Jones and Greene, it
was more than just a mere
short scoring strike. Greene
didn’t get to play in the jamboree last season. He suffered a
season-ending broken leg in
a scrimmage just days before
the 2015 event.
“It’s great to have him
back,” Jones said of Greene.
“He’s the one person that I
wanted to go out on the field
and give a hug [after the
touchdown] because he got
Cont. on page 2
Austin-East
wide receiver
Kevin Andrews
(13) battles for
the ball with
Gibbs High’s
Bryson Lane
in Thursday’s
action at the
KOC KickOff Classic at
Hardin Valley
Academy. The
Roadrunners
and Eagles both
open the season
this week and
each squad made
the playoffs in
2015. Photo by
Dan Andrews.
Tennessee school for the deaf 2016
With player numbers up,
Vikings eye Mason-Dixon title
By Steve Williams
An increase of 10 players on its 2016 squad is the
best preseason news for
Tennessee School for the
Deaf’s football program.
“We have 18 players on
our roster now,” said TSD
head coach Barry Swafford through interpreter and assistant coach
Jordan Cooper following last
Wednesday’s third practice
day. “That’s good.”
Now with a roster size
that can easily work for the
8-man game, TSD has set
its sights on winning another Mason-Dixon Conference
championship.
“We have four upperclassmen, including three
seniors,” added Swafford,
who is beginning his fourth
season as head coach.
“More than half of our players are freshmen and 8th
graders.”
The Vikings will start practice in full pads today (Aug.
15). They play their first
game Saturday, Aug. 27,
at Georgia School for the
Deaf.
Last season, due to a lack
of players, TSD had to forfeit two games in 8-man
football and finished with a
1-2 record, while it had a 2-2
record in 6-man football.
Six players return from
last year’s squad, with junior
Marcus Jones heading the
list. The 5-10, 160-pounder
will play his first season at
quarterback and free safety
or linebacker on defense.
“He’s our franchise player
right now,” said Swafford.
“His footwork is wonderful
and his hips are awesome.
“He’s a complete player.
He can lead the offense and
read the defense.”
Other returnees are
senior center and noseman Clarance Cunningham,
senior guard and defensive
back Cornelius Johnson,
sophomore tight end and
linebacker Matthew Neely,
sophomore running back/
wide receiver and cornerback DeSean Freeman and
sophomore tight end/running back and linebacker
Jacob Johnson.
“I also have a few prospects I think can help us a
lot,” said Swafford.
Tristen Davidson is a
freshman lineman with good
size (5-10, 190) and a good
frame. Lorenzo Currie is a
swift eighth grade running
back.
“He’s very fast,” said
Swafford. “We look forward
to having him the next five
years.”
The Vikings made a good
first impression on their
King’s Academy
Returns Starters
and Experience
By David Klein
PHOTO BY STEVE WILLIAMS
Barry Swafford prepares to throw a pass against the TSD
defense during practice last week. Swafford was a senior
quarterback for the Vikings in the fall of 1970.
coach.
“I found them to be very
motivated and willing to
learn,” recalled Swafford.
“They cooperate with each
other and don’t complain.
They’re very coachable.
“I know we have very little
experience. They need a lot
of learning time. Each time
we play we’ll get better. I
know we will.
“They have a lot of athletic skills, but they’re just very
raw. They need polishing.
“TSD always has been
well known for speed, and
that will carry us through this
season.”
The Vikings won MasonDixon Conference titles in
2011, 2012 and 2014. They
captured the national deaf
championship for 8-man
teams under former coach
Dick Henley in 2011 and
were national deaf runnersup under Swafford’s direction in 2014.
Swafford expects Mississippi School for the Deaf to
be his team’s chief challenger for this season’s MasonDixon title. Mississippi will
be TSD’s homecoming game
opponent this season on
Oct. 1.
The Vikings are scheduled
to play their first home game
at Chambers Field against
South Carolina School for
the Deaf on Sept. 22.
Ethan Swafford, former
TSD quarterback (Class of
2013), has been assisting
his dad as a volunteer coach
and will continue in that role
until he returns to Gallaudet
University in about three
weeks for his senior year.
The King’s Academy Lions
are coming off their first
football playoff berth from
2015. The Division 2, Class
A team returns eight starters on offense and five on
defense. “It’s a great problem to have,” Head Coach
Matt Lowe said.
One key to the returning
offensive starters, Lowe
said, is returning four offensive linemen. Justin Adkins,
Cody Blazer, Cole Lusby,
Shawn Hamilton all return
on the line. “That’s a huge
asset,” Lowe said.
“Most of us know what
to do,” Adkins said of the
offensive line.
Jake Weekly and Isaiah
Jeffers return at wide
receiver. In addition, junior
quarterback Brandon Burgess returns. He has started every game of his career.
“He’s grown a little bit,”
Lowe said. “We’re expecting big things out of him. He
has the potential and ability
to have a big year.”
Since training camp and
fall practice began, the
Lions’ players have named
four captains. Players
selected senior defensive
back and wide receiver Jeffers, Adkins, Burgess, and
junior linebacker and tight
King’s
academy
2016
end Jonathan Atchley as
captains. “The players are
the ones who decide that
stuff more than anything
else,” Lowe said.
Jeffers has great playmaking ability and has
started on both sides of
the ball since his freshman year. “He can play any
position,” Lowe said. “He’s
going to be counted on very
heavily. Offensively, he’s a
guy that needs five to 10
touches a game. Defensively, he’s a difference maker.
For our team to have a lot of
success, he needs to have
a big year for us.”
King’s Academy runs
a spread offense. “We
do a lot of three receiver
sets, sometimes we run
four receiver sets,” Lowe
explained. “We try to be
as balanced as possible
throwing and running.”
“Coach believes in running the ball to win, passing
to score,” Jeffers added.
Senior running back
Philip Sellers is also back
and set the single season
Continued on page 2
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The Knoxville Focus
PAGE C2
Next footstep for Josh Kerr is a
season-opening challenge
By Steve Williams
Josh Kerr and Clinton
High’s football coaching staff
have had the entire off-season to get ready for Thursday night’s game against
visiting Oak Ridge and Tee
Higgins, one of the nation’s
top rated wide receivers. It’s
a scenario that’s right down
Kerr’s alley, too.
“One piece of advice that
my dad told me that I always
remember and try to use is
don’t let them outwork you,”
said Josh via e-mail. “(The
opponent) might be better
in other areas, but they will
not outwork us.”
That priority produced
winning results through the
years for Larry Kerr, Josh’s
father. At the top of his
list of accomplishments is
coaching Halls to the Class
AAA state championship
in 1986. The upcoming
season marks the 30-year
anniversary of that title.
“There are so many things
looking back that I take
away from watching him,
playing for him and working for him,” added Josh.
“He’s been a great role
model for me growing up
and also to work hard to try
to become.”
Larry Kerr became one
of the winningest coaches
in the area over the years,
starting out at Lake City
High (1975 to 1980), and
then going to Halls (1981
to 1992) before returning
to Anderson County, which
consolidated Lake City and
Norris high schools, where
he coached the longest
(1993 to 2008).
That’s a total of 33 seasons and close to 250 wins,
noted Josh Kerr.
“Another thing my dad
was great at was understanding his players and
how to motivate them,”
pointed out Josh. “He had a
knack for getting the most
out of his players and developing great relationships
with them.
“He was hard on them,
demanding, but they knew
he cared about them. That’s
one of the most important
lessons he taught me in
becoming a coach.”
As he follows in his father’s
footsteps, Kerr is early in
his career. He’s entering his
sixth season as head coach
at Clinton. Prior to that, he
directed the White County
High program in Sparta for
two seasons.
Josh was a youngster
during the 1986 season
when Halls beat Germantown 17-15 in the finals. At
that time, Class AAA was
one of only three classifications in Tennessee and the
state’s largest.
That same year AustinEast brought home the
Class AA state crown after
defeating Brentwood Academy 28-20.
Kerr was an offensive lineman for his dad at Anderson
County. He went to Georgia
to start his collegiate career
and later transferred to
ETSU.
Clinton
high 2016
Kerr was 3-17 in his two
years at White County. His
record at Clinton is 17-35.
The Dragons qualified for
the playoffs out of Region
3-5A last season.
HEADLINERS: Week 1
attractions involving local
teams on Friday night will
include Karns at Bearden,
The King’s Academy at Seymour, Greeneville at Anderson County, Halls at Carter,
Campbell County at Gibbs,
Jefferson County at Grace
Christian Academy, Maryville
at Heritage, Hardin Valley at
West, Powell at Farragut and
Alcoa at Webb School.
A Saturday doubleheader
at Burke-Toney Stadium in
Morristown pits Catholic vs.
Morristown West and Fulton
vs. Morristown East.
HVA has higher gridiron expectations in 2016
By Ken Lay
Hardin Valley Academy
will soon begin its eighth
season playing varsity football and in their brief history, the Hawks have written
quite a story.
Under Coach Wes Jones,
Knox County’s newest
public high school football
team won its first-ever varsity game. And after suffering nine consecutive
games in 2008, the Hawks
have made the playoffs
five times over the next six
years. HVA also played in a
bowl game in 2013.
Hardin Valley, which went
5-6 in 2015, has won some
big games. One win, however, continues to elude the
Hawks.
They’ve never won a playoff game.
“That continues to be a
goal and expectation for
us,” Jones said. “I think we
were a little disappointed
last year.
“I’ve told the kids that
they just can’t be happy
just to get there [to the playoffs].”
Jones, the only coach
in HVA’s short football history, is looking for more in
2016.
“It’s been a long camp,”
he said after his Hawks
played Central to a 7-7 tie
at Thursday night’s Knoxville Orthopaedic Kick-Off
Classic Thursday night.
“We’ve raised the expectations and we’ve really
worked these kids hard.
“It was different this year.
We’ve really put pressure
on our kids and I’ve ridden
them hard. Most of them in
[the locker room] probably
can’t stand me right now,
because I’ve been so hard
on them.”
Hardin Valley battled its
share of adversity in 2015.
And it all started about two
weeks before the Hawks
played their first game
when quarterback Gavin
Greene broke his leg in a
scrimmage just days before
his team’s season opener.
The Hawks were ravaged by
injuries but still managed
to win five games against a
difficult Region 1-6A schedule
“[Class] 6A football is 6A
football.” Jones said. “If you
ask [coach] Eddie Courtney
at Farragut about the difference in 6A and 5A football,
where he’s at now, he’ll tell
you there’s a difference.
“In 5A, you’ll have at least
one game where you play a
team that you’re more physical than. In 6A, every team
you play is just as physical
as you are or anybody else
is.”
Camp has been a bit
tough on the Hawks in
2016.
“We’re a little nicked up
and banged up right now,
but I think we’ll have everybody ready to go,” Jones
said. “I’m hoping that we
can get those guys cleared
[to practice] early in the
week so we can get some
work in with those guys.”
Greene, now a senior,
is back and he’s slated to
start Friday night when the
Hawks travel to West High
for the season opener for
both schools Friday night.
He threw a touchdown
pass against Central Thursday night in a 7-7 tie.
He looks to lead a potent
and speedy attack full of
fast skill players.
“One of our strengths is
team speed and I think we
have the fastest team that
we’ve had at Hardin Valley,”
Jones said. “We also have
some good running backs.
These may be the best running backs that we’ve had
and, you know, that we’ve
had some good ones.”
One area of concern for
Jones and the Hawks is
depth. This is especially the
case on the offensive and
defensive fronts.
“Depth is an area of
hardin
valley 2016
concern for us this year at
Hardin Valley because we
play 6A football,” Jones
said. “We have to continue
to build depth. We especially have to continue to build
depth on the offensive line.
We have a lot of those kids
playing both ways.”
Key players for the
Hawks include: Greene,
Braden Cloyd (senior, quarterback/defensive back);
Thomas Clay (senior, wide
receiver/defensive back);
Aaron Dykes (junior, running back/defensive back);
Rook Landers (senior, wide
receiver/linebacker); Tim
Frizzell (senior, running
back/linebacker); Andrew
Foster (senior, kicker);
Colton Burns (senior, running back/linebacker); Seth
Leary (junior, running back/
defensive back); Ellis Chapman (senior, offensive lineman/defensive lineman);
Andrew Merritt (senior,
offensive lineman/defensive lineman) Elijah Jones
(senior, offensive lineman/
defensive lineman) and Jeremiah Russell (senior, running back/linebacker).
Football season kicks off with Jamboree
Cont. from page 1
hit on that touchdown and
that was the first time that
he’s really been stuck since
he got hurt last year.
“He got bumped a little
before that, but that was
the first time he really got
stuck because we’ve literally not let him get hit.”
Contact with Greene was
off limits during preseason
workouts after he had a
long road back.
He’s the projected starter when the Hawks travel
to Marble City to play West
High Friday night at Bill
Wilson Field.
Also for the Hawks, senior
running back Tim Frizzell
rushed for 30 yards on two
carries. Frizzell, who also
plays linebacker for Hardin
Valley, missed the final
three games last season
after he sustained a concussion.
Central pulled even late
when freshman backup
quarterback Eli Sharp
threw a scoring strike to
Louis McNair.
The Bobcats, who won
nine games last season,
open next week at SouthDoyle. The Cherokees
endured a winless 2015
campaign after making a
deep playoff run in 2014.
Carter 7, The King’s Academy 7: Hornets quarterback Dakota Fawver threw
a two-yard touchdown toss
to Caleb Wolfe to give his
squad the lead midway
through the frame.
The Lions answered late
when their field general,
Brandon Burgess, lofted
a 70-yard scoring strike to
Thomas Coleman.
Carter will host Halls
Friday night while TKA will
travel to face in-county foe
Seymour. The Eagles went
7-4 and made the playoffs
under Coach Jerry Cooper.
Anderson County 14, Powell
14: the Mavericks and panthers both featured potent
aerial attacks in Thursday night’s opener. ACHS
sophomore Stanton Martin
threw a pair of touchdown
passes. He connected with
Ryan Moog from 23 yards
out.
Martin was 6-for-9 with
90 yards and he later
connected with Thashad
Thrasher on a 24-yard scoring strike for the Mavs, who
host Greeneville this week.
ACHS went 3-7 and missed
the playoffs last year
Powell quar terback
Shawn Shrieve also threw
two touchdown passes
for the Panthers (1-9 in
2015), including a 9-yard
toss to Nick Moore as time
expired.
Shrieve also threw a
58-yard scoring strike to
Brandon Smith.
The Panthers open their
2016 season against Farragut at Bill Clabo Field on
Friday. The Admirals routed
Powell 49-6 en route to
going 10-2 and winning the
Region 3-5A Championship
last season.
The Kick-Off Classic continued with five games at
West High Friday night.
Results were not available
at press time.
August 15, 2016
Talented veterans
look to make
impact for Central
By Ken Lay
Bryson Rosser isn’t quite
sure what the 2016 season
has in store for his Central
High School Bobcats football team.
“I just want my guys to
become more consistent,”
said Rosser, who will begin
his third season with the
Bobcats when they take the
field Friday night at SouthDoyle in the first of two consecutive road games to
open the campaign. “We
have solid leadership from
our seniors. I don’t know
where we’ll finish.
“But we want to send
them off the best way we
can. They’ve worked really
hard and they deserve
that.”
After playing the Cherokees (who went 0-10 in
2015) the Bobcats face
another tough road tilt
when they travel to Jacksboro to tangle with onetime District 3-AAA rival
Campbell County.
Central (which went 9-3
in 2015) finally comes
home to Dan Y. Boring Stadium on Sept. 2. They will,
however, face a tough test
against defending Class 4A
State Champion Catholic.
The Irish will definitely be
looking for revenge since
Central won last year’s
showdown at Blaine Stadium.
Rosser speaks highly of
his senior class in Fountain
City but he adds that the
Bobcats are strong and talented across the board.
“Our seniors played
under another regime
before I got here,” he said.
“But they respect me and
they believe in me and what
we’re doing.
“We have a good group of
juniors and we have some
good sophomores and
some good freshmen.”
Central will look for strong
play from both the offensive
and defensive lines.
“Our strength will be our
play on the line of scrimmage,” Rosser said. “We’ve
Central
high 2016
got a lot of people returning
up front, and we’re bigger
up front than we’ve been,”
Rosser said.
Senior Isaac Buell will
be the anchor up front as
he returns for his senior
season.
Key returners include:
Trey Mitchell (a senior quarterback who had 15 touchdown tosses in 2015); Buell
(who will play both offense
and defense); Jadarius
Sackie (senior, running
back/linebacker); Rondrow
Peebles (senior, running
back/linebacker); Jarod
Richardson (senior, wide
receiver/linebacker) and
Xavier Washington (sophomore, wide receiver/defensive back).
Teakok Stanley, a senior,
will also provide depth at
the running back position.
Sophomore Ja’Kobi Troutman and junior Alex Hinton
will look to emerge as a
pair of top players up front
in 2016.
Central won a playoff
game in 2015 and has had
some tough times. Last
year’s win total was the
most since 2005 (when the
Bobcats went 11-2). Last
season also represented
just the school’s third winning season in 10 years.
Rosser has established a
firm foundation as he looks
to return a one-time powerhouse program to its glory
days.
But things won’t be
easy as the Bobcats play
in Region 2-4A, a league
that features Fulton, which
is now a football dynasty,
and Catholic, which has
recaptured its past glory
under Coach Steve Matthews, who is a one-time
NFL player.
Carter and Anderson
County also boast two of
the state’s most competitive Class 4A programs.
King’s Academy Returns
Starters and Experience
Cont. from page 1
King’s Academy record
for rushing yards last year
with over 1100 yards.
“For a small guy, he’s a
very strong guy. Has a
lot of natural ability and
speed,” Lowe said.
Many of the Lions’ players play both offense and
defense. Jeffers said he
likes playing defense
more than offense. For
him, defense is “flying
around, making that play,
giving the ball back to the
offense.”
Alongside Jef fers,
defensive starters returning include defensive lineman Kyler Collins, Lusby
at middle linebacker,
Hamilton at defensive
end, and Sellers in the
secondary.
“Defensively, we’re a 44 team (four linemen and
four linebackers),” Lowe
said. “You’re always going
to have certain packages.
You’re essentially putting
eight people in the box.
You’re committed to stopping the run.”
After two scrimmages,
Lowe said the defensive
front is doing a great job in
defending the run. “We’ve
got to be good at stopping
the run and running the
ball,” he emphasized.
The Mountain Lions
play in Division 2A East/
Middle No. 1. There are
four other teams in their
district which are Webb,
Friendship Christian
School, Donelson Christian Academy and Mount
Juliet Christian. Four of
five make the playoffs.
“Last year we went
5-5,” Lowe said. “It was
a lot of excitement. You
want to see how many
weeks you can add on to
your season.”
Jeffers said, “With all
the experience and returning starters we have, it will
definitely help us. Now we
know what it’s like to be in
the playoffs.”
Adkins said last year
was a little overwhelming
because it was the first
time the Lions visited the
playoffs.
However, this year,
Adkins said, “I feel like
with all the experience we
gained last year and with
all the coaches helping us
out during the practices I
feel like we have a very
good chance this year.”
The King’s Academy
opens its season August
19 at Seymour.
August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
PAGE C3
Gillum believes his quarterback can be ‘one of the best’
By Steve Williams
Don’t call him Stanton
Football, but Anderson
County High quarterback
Stanton Martin is the “real
deal,” says head coach
Davey Gillum.
“I think he’s a Johnny Manziel without all the negatives
on the field. Stanton’s not
going to run backwards 30
yards to make a play. He’s
not going to put our offense
in bad positions.
“But I think he has the
potential to be one of the
best to play around here.”
Martin, a 5-9, 175-pound
sophomore, missed most
of his freshman campaign
because of injury. He stood
out with a pair of touchdown
passes against Powell in last
week’s jamboree. The lights
come on for real this Friday
night.
“He’s cerebral, has a great
arm and he’s accurate,” said
Gillum. “He can run too but
we can’t take the chance of
him getting beat up. When
he does run, he runs smart
and knows how to protect
himself.”
The schedule ahead for
Anderson County is again
daunting, but Gillum believes
if his Mavericks get through
it they should be good
enough to have a “puncher’s
chance” in the playoffs.
Last year AC didn’t get
to throw any haymakers.
After a midseason win over
county rival Clinton, the
Mavs lost their last four
games, finished 3-7 and
failed to qualify for postseason play for the first time in
nine years.
“We’ve got to be a mentally tougher team than we
have been and not fold if
things don’t go our way,” said
Gillum, a two-time all-state
running back for AC in the
mid-1990s and the school’s
head coach since 2009.
Anderson County returns
11 players who were starters at one time or another
in 2015.
“We have a ton of skill
players,” said Gillum, “and
12 wide receivers that can
all play. Our linemen have
potential.
“As for the defense, we’ll
be playing kids both ways.
But the back end covers well
and the front four can get to
the football.
“We have to be dynamic
and explosive on offense
and we’ve got to create turnovers on defense,” summed
up Gillum.
In addition to Martin, AC
has all-star candidates in
sophomore DE-TE Ryan
Moog, junior OL Thomas
Roberts (6-3, 285), sophomore DL-OL Trey Noe (6-1,
235), junior RB Mason Phillips, senior WR Thyshad
Thrasher and junior CB
Dalton Wilson.
Top returnees also are
Thrasher at cornerback,
senior WR Everett Dews and
sophomore WR Michael Carroll.
Lady Bulldogs have some
extra motivation in 2016
By Ken Lay
Many members of the
Bearden High School girls
soccer team were on hand
in May when the boys
claimed the Class AAA State
Championship in Murfreesboro and coach Ryan Radcliffe (who coaches both
teams) is hoping that the
Lady Bulldogs will enter the
2016 campaign with a little
extra motivation.
“A lot of the girls were
there at the state tournament,” said Radcliffe, who
opens his third season at
his alma mater and has won
a state title as both a player
and coach at Bearden.
“They saw all of the excitement at those games and
I think that will serve as
a little extra motivational
factor for the girls.
“The girls saw our [boys’]
state championship shirts
at school and they know
that’s there’s another
soccer team here.”
The Lady Bulldogs, who
went 15-3-2 in 2015 and
won the District 4-AAA regular-season championship
(but failed to reach the
Region 2-AAA Tournament
when they were eliminated
by Maryville in the district
tournament semifinals),
have won state titles in the
past but it’s been a while
since Bearden won it all.
The Lady Bulldogs last
hoisted a championship
plaque in 2007.
But Radcliffe said that he
has a formula for success
and he watched last spring
as his boys side executed
that formula.
“With the boys, we talked
about winning your district
first and we talked about
winning the region,” Radcliffe said. “Then, you have
to win that sub-state elimination game and then you
get to state and you enjoy
it.
“We’ve talked about that
with the girls and the first
thing you have to do is win
your district first. And our
district is extremely competitive, especially with
the girls. It doesn’t matter
if you’re the No. 1, No. 2,
No. 3 or No. 4 seed. You
can win the [district] tournament.”
Bearden and Farragut
were both eliminated in
the district semis and both
lost their final matches at
home.
Hardin Valley Academy
(No. 3) made it to the state
tournament for the second
consecutive season last
year.
Bearden made it to the
state sectionals in 2014
and they upset Maryville
in the district semis only to
see the Lady Rebels return
the favor last season.
Bearden may have lost
Casey Riemer to graduation
but the Bulldogs have some
young talent and some veteran players.
Key returners include:
Taylor Frizen (a senior
forward and three-year
starter); Clarity Voy (a senior
who is one of the area’s top
defenders); Ashtyn Glover
(junior, midfielder) and
Emily Carlevato (sophomore, defender).
Radcliffe admits that
Bearden will be young
and small but he said that
Frizen, who is one of the
county’s top athletes, has
emerged as a leader and
that Voy’s toughness will be
handy in the team’s crucial
district games.
“Taylor is just a freak of
an athlete. She’s one of the
best athletes that I’ve ever
had or been around,” Radcliffe said. “Clarity will give
us that force that we’ll need
against teams like Hardin
Valley and Maryville.”
The Lady Bulldogs will
open their season at home
against Maryville Tuesday
night at Bruce Allender
Field. Kickoff is slated for
7 p.m. in this key early-season league tilt.
Tee Higgins picks
Clemson over Vols
By Alex Norman
s Most college football
/coaches love to talk about
ethe importance of recruitring their home state, the
,whole “put up a wall around
nthe borders” thing…
- Tennessee head coach
tButch Jones has made
frecruiting the Volunteer
state a priority since he
tarrived in Knoxville in
sDecember of 2012. Getuting players like Nashville’s
yDerek Barnett, Hendersonoville’s Jalen Hurd, Gallatin’s
Josh Malone and Knoxlville’s Todd Kelly Jr. were
-huge gets from a program
lthat needed players of that
ecaliber desperately.
n But it’s getting tougher to
keep the 4 and 5 star guys
rfrom looking elsewhere.
g Tee Higgins, the top prostpect in the Class of 2017
ein Tennessee, is a 5-star
recruit from nearby Oak
,Ridge High School. He was
eat one time a Vols commit,
ebut he de-committed and
hback in July told Clemson
shad he would be a Tiger.
I “The family feel they gave
yme just made you feel like
family,” said Higgins. “I
yreally liked that so that is
twhy I chose Clemson.”
And while the perception
might be that Higgins would
be stressed out about the
decision to leave East Tennessee for a small town in
South Carolina, it doesn’t
sound like Higgins was too
worried about making this
call regarding his future.
“A lot of Vol fans wanted
me to commit to Tennessee
but I felt no pressure,” said
Higgins. “Because it is my
decision. It is just me and
my Mom so…”
Higgins, who also considered Ole Miss, Ohio State
and Florida State, won the
Mr. Football Award in Class
5A for Backs last season.
He caught 52 passes for
941 yards and 18 touchdowns in 2015.
He is currently listed as
the 4th best wide receiver
and the 20th best overall
player in the nation.
“As a wide receiver he
has all the tools. He really
doesn’t have a weakness,”
said Oak Ridge head coach
Joe Gaddis. “He can run
fast, he can jump, he has
great hands… he’s a good
blocker, he’s a great route
runner… honestly he can
score anytime he touches
the ball. He doesn’t have
a downside. That’s what
makes him special. I think
he can be a special one at
the next level and the level
after that. He’s that good
and we are fortunate to
have him right here with us
right now.”
Players like Barnett and
Hurd were wooed to Tennessee in part with the
understanding that early
playing time was a strong
possibility, and they each
saw significant action as
true freshmen. But now
that Jones has built depth
on the roster, it isn’t as easy
to use that as a recruiting
tool. The price of recruiting success is that one of
those advantages you had
is now gone.
Tee Higgins knew that
getting on the field at the
next level will take effort
at any of the top programs
he was looking at, and he
sounds ready for the challenge.
“Every freshman is going
to have to go in and have
to work,” said Higgins. “You
don’t have a position automatically. I have a good
work ethic so it isn’t like I’m
going in and have a starting
position so I’m gonna have
to work for it.”
One other note concerning Higgins. He’s not only
a standout at football, but
he is one of the top high
school basketball players
in the state as well. However, once he gets to college,
all of his athletic pursuits
will be centered on football. And that should do
nothing but help him going
forward.
“It’s gonna improve my
game a lot because with
me playing basketball I
didn’t have much time to
get in the weight room and
get big, so that’s gonna
improve a lot,” said Higgins.
“The only weakness he
has as a high school football player is that he is
in football, then basketball, and then spring football. He misses the weight
room,” said Gaddis. “The
one month he is in the
weight room he works hard,
but he will transform from a
young man to a really well
developed man here in a
couple of years. He will
get in weight room training
table and he will go from
190 pounds to 220 pounds
and all muscle and he’ll get
faster and be a different
guy.”
When the Mavericks run
the football, look for Phillips
to carry the load. He can be
a workhorse. Last season at
Clinton, Phillips rushed 43
times for 292 yards and five
touchdowns to lead a dramatic comeback win.
Key defensive linemen
include Roberts, senior Doug
Stooksbury (5-10, 245) and
senior K.C. Harber (5-10,
215).
Sophomore linebacker
Marquise Gallahar also is
being counted on and Gillum
said senior Caleb Bethel is
a “big weapon” as a kicker
and punter.
Others expected to contribute significantly this fall
include senior WR Riley
Sexton, versatile junior Chris
Anderson
County
2016
Powell and sophomore offensive lineman Blake Chapman (6-0, 220).
Also joining the team
last week was Max Wahl, a
junior WR-DB who is a foreign exchange student from
Austria.
Anderson County will face
a tough test right off the bat
when it hosts Region 1-4A
champion Greeneville. The
Mavs’ rugged four-game
start also has road trips
to Heritage and Oak Ridge
sandwiched around a home
game against Fulton.
Lady Spartans will
continue to chase
elusive state berth
By Ken Lay
Webb School of Knoxville’s girls soccer team will
begin its 2016 season today (Aug. 15) and the Lady
Spartans will open with a tough match out of the
gate when they invade the Farragut Soccer Stadium
to tangle with the Lady Admirals.
Kickoff is slated for 7 p.m.
Webb won 16 games last season and came up just
short of making the Division II-A State Tournament
last season for the second year in a row. The Lady
Spartans have been successful in recent years but
they haven’t made it to the state tournament.
“We were 16-3-1 last year and that was the best
record that we’ve ever had,” Webb coach Sonny Trotter said. “Getting to state is always our goal and we’re
sure going to give it a try this year.
“We’ve made the final eight each of the last two
years so we’ve been really close. I think we were a
little closer last year than we were the year before.”
The Lady Spartans will have to replace some players who graduated following the 2015 season but
they do have some battle-tested veterans.
Top returners, according to Trotter, include: Lexi
Reeves (senior, forward); Maya Reeves (senior,
defender); Avery Catlett (sophomore, midfielder);
Darby Bauman (a junior forward who led the Lady
Spartans in scoring last season); Ellie Mamantov
(senior, defender); Abby Bailey (senior, midfielder);
Lauren Kentfield (senior, defender); Madalyn Mead
(sophomore, goalkeeper); Reagan Taylor (sophomore,
midfielder); Virginia Sances (sophomore, midfielder)
and Kaitlin Ladha (junior, midfielder).
That talented crop of savvy players will be joined by
newcomers and incoming freshmen Sarah Satterfield
in the midfield and Julianna Everting on defense.
Trotter said that he expects Webb to score goals
thanks to some experience forwards and midfielders.
The Lady Spartans, however, must play well together in order to make a deep postseason run according
to their third-year head coach.
“We lost some people,” Trotter said. “But I think we
will be a pretty good goal scoring team and we’ll have
a decent center midfield.
“Our strengths will be our ability to score and our
ability in the center midfield. We will have to learn
how to play well together. We’ll have to work well and
continue to learn to play well together.”
The Knoxville Focus
PAGE C4
August 15, 2016
PREP FOOTBALLfocus
Class A, R1
CONF.
GAME
MyVLT
TV GAME
WEEK 1
WEEK 2
WEEK 3
WEEK 4
WEEK 5
WEEK 6
WEEK 7
WEEK 8
WEEK 9
WEEK
WEEK
Aug. 18-20
Aug. 25-27
Sept. 1-3
Sept. 8-10
Sept. 15-17
Sept. 22-24
Sept. 29-Oct .1
Oct. 6-8
Oct. 13-15
Oct. 20-22
Oct. 27-29
vs.
Mississippi
vs.
Carolinas
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
vs.
EzellHarding
vs.
Oakdale
OPEN
vs.
Georgia
vs.
Grace
Baptist
vs.
Sale
Creek
vs.
Alcoa
OPEN
vs.
Mt. Juliet
Christian
vs.
CAK
vs.
Seymour
vs
Boyd
Buchanon
vs.
Friendship
Christian
vs.
Oneida
DCA
vs.
Scott
vs.
Halls
vs.
Tellico
Plains
vs.
Fulton
vs.
Wartburg
vs.
Jefferson
County
vs.
CAK
vs.
Oliver
Springs
vs.
Campbell
County
vs.
Livingston
Academy
vs.
Grace
Christian
vs.
Scott
vs.
Webb
vs.
William
Blount
vs.
King’s
Academy
11
vs.
Carolinas
(ENCSD)
OPEN
vs.
Cloudland
vs.
Davidson
Academy
vs.
Hancock
County
vs.
King’s
Academy
vs.
Friendship
Christian
vs.
Grace
Christian
vs.
DCA
vs.
BGA
OPEN
vs.
Oak Ridge
vs.
King’s
Academy
OPEN
vs.
Lancaster
Christian
vs.
Concord
Christian
vs.
Mt Juliet
Christian
vs.
Lenoir
City
vs.
Knoxville
Webb
OPEN
vs.
Oliver
Springs
vs.
Union
County
vs.
Rockwood
Sweetwater
vs.
vs.
Grace
Christian
vs.
Rockwood
vs.
Knoxville
Webb
OPEN
vs.
Wartburg
Sweetwater
vs.
Tellico
Plains
vs.
AustinEast
vs.
Knoxville
Webb
vs.
Kingston
vs.
DCA
vs.
Loudon
vs.
Clinton
vs.
McMinn
Central
OPEN
vs.
Alcoa
vs.
Loudon
vs.
Maryville
vs.
Scott
vs.
Heritage
vs.
McMinn
Central
OPEN
vs.
Kingston
vs.
Red Bank
vs.
CAK
vs.
Pigeon
Forge
vs.
Sullivan
South
OPEN
vs.
Sullivan
Central
vs.
Sullivan
East
vs.
Cherokee
vs.
Scott
vs.
Grainger
vs.
Volunteer
vs.
Greeneville
vs.
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Fulton
vs.
Oak
Ridge
vs.
Union
County
vs.
Clinton
vs.
Knoxville
Catholic
OPEN
vs.
Knoxville
Central
vs.
Morristown
East
vs.
Carter
vs.
Halls
vs.
Jefferson
County
vs.
Union
County
vs.
West
vs.
Central
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
Fulton
OPEN
vs.
Knoxville
Catholic
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Anderson
County
vs.
Morristown
West
vs.
CPA
vs.
Central
vs.
Notre
Dame
vs.
Fulton
vs.
Belfry
vs.
Anderson
County
OPEN
vs.
Carter
vs.
Cloudland
vs.
Union
County
vs.
South
Doyle
vs.
Campbell
County
vs.
Knoxville
Catholic
OPEN
vs.
Carter
Morristown
vs.
vs.
Union
County
vs.
Anderson
County
vs.
Powell
vs.
Fulton
vs.
vs.
Maryville
vs.
Anderson
County
vs.
AustinEast
vs.
Catholic
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Carter
OPEN
vs.
Union
County
vs.
West
vs.
Central
vs.
Campbell
County
vs.
Farragut
vs.
Powell
vs.
Karns
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Fulton
vs.
Halls
OPEN
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
Carter
vs.
West
vs.
Carter
vs.
AustinEast
vs.
West
vs.
Union
County
vs.
SouthDoyle
OPEN
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Central
vs.
Powell
vs.
Karns
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Farragut
vs.
Bearden
vs.
Gibbs
OPEN
vs.
West
vs.
Hardin
Valley
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Karns
vs.
Halls
vs.
Central
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
Central
vs.
Karns
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Hardin
Valley
vs.
Halls
vs.
Carter
vs.
West
OPEN
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Farragut
vs.
Powell
vs.
HVA
vs.
Sevier
County
vs.
Halls
vs.
Carter
vs.
Powell
OPEN
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
Farragut
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Fulton
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Farragut
Chattanooga
WEBB
vs.
Unaka
vs.
South
Carolina
10
vs.
South
Carolina
OPEN
TSD
Concord
HOME
GAMES
IN GOLD
Class A, R2
KING’S ACAD
vs.
Class A, R2
AUSTIN-EAST
Class AA, R2
GCA
vs.
Class AA, R2
CAK
Class AAA, R2
ALCOA
Class AAA, R2
SEYMOUR
Class 4A, R1
Greeneville
ANDERSON
COUNTY
Class 4A, R2
CARTER
Class 4A, R2
CATHOLIC
Class 4A, R2
CENTRAL
(@
Vanderbilt)
West
vs.
Halls
Class 4A, R2
Morristown
FULTON
East
Class 4A, R2
GIBBS
Class 5A, R2
HALLS
Class 5A, R2
POWELL
Class 5A, R2
SOUTH DOYLE
Class 5A, R2
WEST
Class 5A, R2
CLINTON
vs.
Oak
Ridge
Morristown
vs.
Karns
vs.
Rhea
County
vs.
Campbell
County
vs.
Anderson
County
vs.
Lenoir
City
vs.
CAK
OPEN
vs.
Powell
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Oak Ridge
vs.
Bearden
vs.
Karns
OPEN
vs.
Campbell
vs.
West
vs.
Lenoir
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
Clinton
vs.
Bearden
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
Clinton
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Farragut
OPEN
vs.
Oak
Ridge
vs.
Powell
vs.
Campbell
County
vs.
Halls
vs.
Lenoir
City
vs.
Maryville
vs.
Anderson
County
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
William
Blount
vs.
Gibbs
vs.
Alcoa
vs.
Powell
vs.
West
vs.
Clinton
vs.
Halls
vs.
Karns
vs.
Powell
vs.
Hardin
Valley
vs.
Farragut
vs.
William
Blount
vs.
Maryville
vs.
Bradley
Central
OPEN
vs.
DobynsBennett
vs.
Science
Hill
vs.
Jefferson
County
vs.
West
OPEN
vs.
Bearden
vs.
SouthDoyle
vs.
DobynsBennett
vs.
Powell
vs.
Science
Hill
vs.
Jefferson
County
vs.
Bradley
Central
vs.
William
Blount
vs.
Maryville
vs.
Jefferson
County
vs.
Science
Hill
vs.
Maryville
vs.
Hardin
Valley
vs.
Bradley
Central
vs.
DobynsBennett
OPEN
vs.
William
Blount
vs.
Bradley
Central
vs.
Hardin
Valley
East
Class 5A, R3
FARRAGUT
County
City
Class 5A, R3
KARNS
Class 5A, R3
HERITAGE
OPEN
Class 5A, R2
BEARDEN
Class 6A, R1
HARDIN VALLEY
Class 6A, R1
W. BLOUNT
vs.
Lenior
City
vs.
Alcoa
vs.
DobynsBennett
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Bearden
vs.
Heritage
vs.
Fulton
vs.
Jefferson
County
vs.
Alcoa
vs.
Science
Hill
OPEN
Class 6A, R1
MARYVILLE
Class 6A, R1
vs.
Bearden
August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
PAGE D1
August 15, 2016
Probiotics
For thousands or millions of years - depending on your interpretation
of science and scripture mankind has had a symbiotic relationship with bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract or “gut.” In fact,
a depletion or eradication
of bacteria with antibiotics
often causes disease. An
example is “antibiotic colitis” which results from an
overgrowth of an organism
called clostridium difficile.
This bacterium is normally held in check because it
must compete with billions
of other bacteria in the gut,
at least until these bacteria
are depleted by antibiotics
and the resistant clostridia species proliferates and
releases toxins which produce diarrhea and colitis
(inflamed colon).
In a medical career
spanning four decades
I’ve attended a lot of medical conferences and lectures. However, the most
memorable and entertaining medical lecture was
gien by a self-described
“flatologist.” This gastroenterologist’s specialty and
area of research was colonic gas. Imagine a career
spent collecting and analyzing gaseous emissions
of the colon.
I don’t mean to be crass,
but we all produce flatus,
or as I was taught in grammar school, we all fart. And
we’ve heard of people who
are able to ignite the gas
expelled from their lower
regions. Methane is the
principal component of
natural gas which heats our
homes and cooks our food
more efficiently than electricity. Cows produce lots
of methane from the vegetable matter they eat. The
methane is then expelled in
due course and is a major
greenhouse gas. Some of
us also expel flammable
methane.
I learned from the erudite
professor that about 15% of
humans produce methane
which can be used by those
so “gifted” at fraternity parties, though with the risk of
fire and explosion! In fact,
one reason colon preps are
ordered by your doctor is to
prevent explosions which
have occurred when electrocautery used to remove
polyps ignites methane
which remains without adequate purging. In humans
methane is produced when
certain strains of bacteria
act on vegetable matter.
It turns out that if you are
among the 15% that possess the methane producing bacteria, your gut was
colonized with that strain
when you were a newborn
infant and you received the
colonizing strain from your
mother - God love her!
The “Gas Expert” further
enlightened me with his
research demonstrating
that humans on an average pass gas seven to fifteen times per twenty four
hours. Women dispute this
research, but men use it
as a defense when “indiscretions” occur. The flatologist’s lecture concluded with a historical piece
de resistance. It seems a
“gifted” performer in the
late 1800s at the Folies
Bergere in Paris was able
to control his expelled gas
sufficiently to play the Marseillaise, the French National Anthem! I have not been
able to corroborate this factoid, but a friend of mine
maintains you should never
spoil a good story with
facts.
We usually get along
with the bacteria in our
gut unless we become
KCHD seeking parental feedback on its
in-school influenza vaccination program
The Knox County Health Department
(KCHD) is asking parents for feedback
on how best to proceed with its inschool flu vaccination program. The
organization has decided, based on
new evidence, to offer the injectable flu
vaccine or flu shot instead of the nasal
spray vaccine (FluMist). To gather feedback, KCHD is asking parents to complete a short, online survey available at
knoxcounty.org/health by Friday, Aug.
19. The organization will use the feedback to design this year’s program.
“To keep vaccination rates high, we
know we need to make getting the flu
vaccination as easy as possible. For
many parents, simply sending their child
to school with a consent form is much
more convenient than taking time off
work and scheduling an appointment,”
said KCHD Clinical Services Director
Dr. Kelly Cooper. “Changing the vaccine
from a nasal spray to a shot, however,
changes the game a bit. Many parents
may want to be present for a shot, for
example. So we’re exploring offering
clinics before school, after school or
on the weekends, but we want to make
those decisions by partnering with parents.”
FluMist is an intranasal influenza vaccine that was approved by the Food and
Drug Administration for use in children
as young as 2. Previous data showed
that the nasal spray and the injectable
vaccine were equally effective. However, in June 2016, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP),
a group of medical and public health
experts on the use of vaccines who
advise the Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention (CDC), made a recommendation not to use the intranasal
or nasal spray flu vaccine during the
2016-2017 flu season due to a decline
in effectiveness over time.
“It is important to remember this is
Continued on page 3
“poisoned” with tainted or
spoiled food. Thirty years
later, I still remember the
oyster that didn’t quite
taste right and led to a
night of misery as I struggled to decide which way
to address the toilet. Scientists know that we carry billions of bacteria in our guts,
but now they are asking
why we are so designed or
have evolved to require foreign organisms in our colon
for health. A recent article
in the NEJM (New England Journal of Medicine)
alluding to a relationship
between gut bacteria and
heart attacks caught my
eye and raised the issue
of symbiosis and “probiotics.”
In addition to antibiotics, the gut’s bacterial
ecology can be modified
through dietary components known as PREbiotics which promote growth
and metabolism of beneficial bacteria. You can also
affect the fecal ecology by
adding bacteria to the gut
with agents known as PRObiotics. Lastly, as strange
as it sounds, researchers
have even isolated bacteria
from the feces of others,
and transplanted these
into the colon of patients
suffering from colitis to
help restore a more balanced fecal flora and treat
disease not responding to
standard treatments!
The science of certain
dietary elements known
as prebiotics is described
in the June 23rd New England Journal of Medicine.
These nutrients (carnitine,
choline and phosphatidylcholine) are processed by
gut bacteria to produce
TMA (trimethylamine). TMA
has been shown to produce cholesterol rich cells
in the walls of blood vessels which accumulate as
plaque which can rupture.
Oxidized TMA also makes
platelets “sticky” and promotes clotting in a ruptured
cholesterol plaque causing
a heart attack. While these
associations are intriguing,
we are not ready to jump on
this bandwagon and alter
our diets!
Probiotics are “microorganisms [having] beneficial properties for the
host,” and are increasingly being used as medicinal
agents. Science has been
able to demonstrate beneficial effects of probiotics
in some conditions, most
notably inflammatory bowel
diseases like ulcerative
colitis and Crohn’s Disease.
There is less good data to
support the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and a host of other
gastrointestinal conditions.
There has even been experimental models showing
benefits of probiotics and
immune system recognition
of cancer cells. The problem is that probiotics are
diverse in formulation and
as dietary supplements
they are not regulated by
the FDA. People often ask
me about yogurt to reconstitute normal bowel flora.
Unfortunately, the bacteria
in yogurt often don’t survive the acidic stomach
and are not therapeutically useful.
Too often we take health
for granted. The longer I
live the more impressed I
am with the majesty, intricacy and the mystery of
Creation. The materialist
holds that if he can’t experience something (see,
touch, understand or measure) it doesn’t exist in his
world view. In my experience that is hubris (arrogant pride) and foolishness. The Apostle Paul, no
shoddy philosopher, spoke
to our imperfect understanding and vision in I Corinthians 13:12.
How interesting that
western science is increasingly embracing the concept that health is a balance (yin and yang?). We
are learning that there is
also balance in the gut
involving bacteria, the protective lining of the intestinal tract and the underlying
immune system’s destruction or tolerance of foreign
agents (bacteria).
Yes, we are “fearfully and
wonderfully made,” sang
the Psalmist 3000 years
ago. It is still true today.
You may email Dr. Ferguson
at [email protected]
Meet Hobo the Wonder Dog
Join Hobo the
and celebrate
Wonder Dog
the Park with
Saturday August
the Hike 100
20, in The Great
Challenge.
Smoky MounHikers who
tain National
complete the
Park. Hobo conchallenge will
tinues celebratbe awarded a
ing and promotcommemoraBy Howard Baker,
ing the National
tive Hike 100
RN BSN
Park Service’s
pin and be reccentennial year
ognized during
with a short hike with Park a special ceremony with
Superintendent Cassius Superintendent Cash on
Cash. The Great Smoky December 6th. This is a
Mountain National Park great opportunity for everyhas limited trails available one to get out and enjoy
for hiking with Hobo and the Great Smoky Mountain
his four-legged friends. National Park along a trail
Join Hobo the Wonder that will inspire you and
Dog and join in the fun by encourage you to enjoy
taking a hike with Superin- more of our national treatendent Cash.
sures.
The Smoky Mountain
Hobo the Wonder Dog
National Park has chal- will hike with Superintenlenged others to get out dent Cash on August 20th
and learn how he and his
four-legged friends can
enjoy more of the Great
Smoky Mountain National
Park. Please remember,
there are only two trails in
the Great Smoky Mountain
National Park available for
you and your dog to enjoy
together. In the coming
weeks we will write about
how to enjoy the Smoky
Mountains with Fido with
a list of do’s and don’ts.
For more information on
the Hike 100 Challenge
and to download a free
Hike 100 log sheet please
visit www.nps.gov/grsm. If
you are interested in joining Hobo on this adventure
please comment on Hobo’s
Facebook page Hobo the
Wonder Dog.
Life is better with a dog!
Woof!
WINDSOR
GARDENS
ASSISTED LIVING
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    
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
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•   
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Conveniently located at Exit 108 (Merchants Rd.) off I-75
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merican Family Dentistry provides
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Knoxville, Tn. 37934
(865) 622-5494 (865) 622-5494
The Knoxville Focus
PAGE D2
August 15, 2016
Legal & public notices
Foreclosure
notices
NOTICE OF
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms and
conditions of a Deed of Trust dated December
2, 2002, executed by BONNIE K. PARKER,
MICHAEL R. PARKER, conveying certain real
property therein described to ARNOLD M. WEISS,
as Trustee, as same appears of record in the
Register’s Office of Knox County, Tennessee
recorded December 10, 2002, at Instrument
Number 200212100051009;
and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said
Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned
to U.S. Bank National Association as Trustee for
NRZ Pass-Through Trust II who is now the owner
of said debt;
and WHEREAS, the undersigned,Rubin Lublin
TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute
Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the
Register’s Office of Knox County, Tennessee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given
that the entire indebtedness has been declared
due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin
Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly
appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and
authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute
Trustee will, on September 8, 2016 at 10:00
AM at the City/County Lobby of the Knox County
Courthouse, located in Knoxville, Tennessee,
proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY,
the following described property situated in Knox
County, Tennessee, to wit:
SITUATED IN DISTRICT NO. SIX (6) OF
KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, WITHOUT
THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE, BEING KNOWN AND
DESIGNATED AS LOT 108, MONTGOMERY
COVE SUBDIVISION, UNIT 1, AS SHOWN ON
THE FINAL PLAT FOR UNIT 1, MONTGOMERY
COVE SUBDIVISION, OF RECORD IN PLAT
CABINET O, SLIDE 228-C, REGISTER`S OFFICE,
KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, TO WHICH MAP
SPECIFIC REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE FOR A
MORE PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION. TOGETHER
WITH AND SUBJECT TO THE RIGHTS AND
OBLIGATIONS IN THE AMENITIES AREA AND
OTHER COMMON AREAS AS A MEMBER IN THE
MONTGOMERY COVE OWNERS` ASSOCIATION,
INC. AS SET OUT IN DEED BOOK 2220, PAGE
646, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE FOR KNOX
COUNTY, TENNESSEE. THIS CONVEYANCE
IS MADE SUBJECT TO ALL APPLICABLE
EASEMENTS, RESTRICTIONS AND BUILDING
SET BACK LINES.
Parcel ID: 162LA041
PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of
the property is believed to be 12417 MARSHALL
GROVE LANE, KNOXVILLE, TN 37922. In the
event of any discrepancy between this street
address and the legal description of the property,
the legal description shall control.
CURRENT OWNER(S): BONNIE K. PARKER,
MICHAEL R. PARKER
OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: Chase
Manhattan Bank USA, N.A., Department of
Justice (TN), Internal Revenue Service (TN),
Montgomery Cove Homeowners Association,
Regions Bank The sale of the above-described
property shall be subject to all matters shown on
any recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive
covenants, easements or set-back lines that may
be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances
as well as any priority created by a fixture filing;
and to any matter that an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose. This property is
being sold with the express reservation that it is
subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute
Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day, time, and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement at the
time and place for the sale set forth above. All right
and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise,
homestead, and dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is,
where is, without representations or warranties of
any kind, including fitness for a particular use or
purpose. In addition this sale shall be subject to
the right of redemption by the UNITED STATES
OF AMERICA, pursuant to 26 U.S.C. 7425(d)(1)
by reason of the following tax lien(s) of record in:
Instrument Number 201301110045843. Notice of
the sale has been given to the UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA in accordance with 26 U.S.C. 7425(b).
THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A
DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute
Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500
Memphis, TN 38103
www.rubinlublin.com/property-listings.php
Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846
Ad #102215: 2016-08-15 201608-22, 2016-08-29
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
Default having been made in the payment of
the debts and obligations secured to be paid by
Deed of Trust (“Deed of Trust”) dated November
30, 2012, and recorded as Instrument No.
201212040035953 in the Register’s Office for
Knox County, Harry H. Mabry Sr and wife Inez
O. Mabry, (“Grantor”) conveyed in trust to David
A. Underwood, as Trustee for Knoxville Teachers
Federal Credit Union, a certain tract of land
located in Knox County, Tennessee, and the owner
of the debt secured, Knoxville Teachers Federal
Credit Union, having requested the undersigned
to advertise and sell the property described in
and conveyed by said Deed of Trust, all of said
indebtedness having matured by default in the
payment of a part thereof, at the option of the
owner, this is give notice that the undersigned will,
on September 16, 2016 at 10:00 a.m., at the
City-County Building, outside the large assembly
room, Knox County, Tennessee proceed to sell at
public outcry to the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described property, to wit:
Situate in District 6 of Knox County,
Tennessee, and being part of Lot 25-R, Revised
Property of C. H. Butcher, Jr., as shown by the
map recorded in Map Book 83-S, pages 32 and
33, in the Register’s Office for Knox County,
Tennessee, and being more particularly bounded
and described as follows: Beginning at an old iron
rod in the South line of Copper Valley Road, a joint
permanent easement, distant easterly 1,275.15
feet from the point of intersection with Highway
33; thence with the South line of Copper Valley
Road North 67 degrees 21 minutes
East 227.33 feet to an old iron rod, corner to
Lot 24; thence with the line of Lot 24 South 22
degrees 39 minutes East 969.05 feet to an old
iron rod in the line of property of M. Jorgenson
(1930/1228); thence with said line South 68
degrees 03 minutes West 227.35 feet to an old
iron rod; thence North 22 degrees 39 minutes West
966.27 feet to the beginning, containing 5.0475
acres, as surveyed by Michael E. Luethke, R. L. S.
#842, Luethke Surveying Company, 6538 Vintage
Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37921, on September
29, 2003, Drawing Number 03120; being the
same property conveyed to Delmer Lee Henderson
and wife, Yong Suk Henderson on July 20, 1989,
by the deed recorded in Deed Book 1998, page
1120, in the Register’s Office for Knox County,
Tennessee; together with all appurtenant right,
title and interest in the joint permanent easement
for access and utility and drainage purposes
shown on the map aforesaid subject, however,
to the rights of others therein,; subject to the
Restrictions in Deed Book 1767, page 645, and to
the 5’ and 10’ drainage and utility easements and
the easement for construction of a water tank and
access to tank on the rear 100 feet of the property
as shown on the recorded map and the survey.
BEING THE SAME PROPERTY conveyed to
Henry H. Mabry, Sr., single by Quitclaim Deed form
Inez O. Royston, formerly Inez O. Mabry, single,
dated April 9, 2015, as recorded as Instrument
No. 201504230057448 in the Register’s Office
for Knox County, Tennessee.
This conveyance is made subject to applicable
restrictions, building setback lines, all existing
easements, and to all conditions as shown on the
recorded map.
The proceeds of the sale will be applied in
accordance with the terms and provisions of the
above-named Deed of Trust. Said sale is being
made upon the request of Knoxville Teachers
Federal Credit Union, the owner and holder of the
indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, due
to the failure of the makers to comply with all
provisions of the Deed of Trusts.
Other parties interested as defined by
Tennessee statutes and to whom the agent for
the Trustee has given notice of the sale include
the following: Knox County, Tennessee, City of
Knoxville.
The sale of the above-described property
shall be subject to all matters shown on any
recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; and restrictive
covenants, easements or set-back lines that may
be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances
as well as any priority created by a fixture filing;
and to any matter that an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose. This property is
being sold with the express reservation that it is
subject to confirmation by the lender and/or agent
for the Trustee. Should the highest bidder fail to
comply with the terms of the bid at the public
sale, then the agent for the Trustee shall have the
option of accepting the second highest bid, or the
next highest bid with which the buyer is able to
comply.
This sale may be rescinded at any time. The
right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day, time, and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement at the time
and place for the sale set forth above. All right
and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise,
homestead, and dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as agent for Trustee, and subject to the approval
of the Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where
is, without representation or warranties of any
kind, including fitness for a particular purpose.
Notice provided for the foreclosure sale
of 9120 Copper Valley Road, Knoxville,
Tennessee 37938 by:
Jedidiah C. McKeehan
Tarpy, Cox, Fleishman & Leveille, PLLC
Agent for Trustee
1111 Northshore Dr, Ste N-290
Knoxville, TN 37919
865 588-1096
NOTICE OF
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms and
conditions of a Deed of Trust dated June 23,
2010, executed by ROBERT JEARL CRUMLEY
and JR, Karen L Crumley, conveying certain real
property therein described to FIDELITY NATIONAL
TITLE, as Trustee, as same appears of record in
the Register’s Office of Knox County, Tennessee
recorded July 1, 2010, at Instrument Number
201007010000053;
and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said
Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to
Embrace Home Loans, Inc who is now the owner
of said debt;
and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Rubin Lublin
TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute
Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the
Register’s Office of Knox County, Tennessee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given
that the entire indebtedness has been declared
due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin
Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly
appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and
authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute
Trustee will, on September 1, 2016 at 10:00
AM at the North Side Entrance of the City County
Building, 400 Main Street, Knoxville, TN 37902,
proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY,
the following described property situated in Knox
County, Tennessee, to wit:
LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS
SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF KNOX, STATE
OF TENNESSEE IN DEED INSTRUMENT
2008071804454 AND IS DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: SITUATE IN THE SIXTH (6TH) CIVIL
DISTRICT OF KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, AND
BEING ALL OF LOT 16R-1 OF THE RESUBDIVISION
OF LOT 16 IN W.D. JONES THIRD SUBDIVISION
OF RECORD IN MAP BOOK 14, PAGE 36 AND
AS SHOWN BY SURVEY OF EDDIE R. GARRETT
DATED APRIL 13, 1990, AND BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN IN THE
NORTH LINE OF MYNATT ROAD DISTANT 612.02
FEET IN A NORTHWESTERLY DIRECTION FROM
THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF MYNATT ROAD
WITH RIFLE RANGE ROAD, SAID POINT ALSO
BEING DISTANT 35 FEET FROM THE CENTER
LINE OF MYNATT ROAD; THENCE FROM SAID
BEGINNING POINT AND RUNNING WITH THE
NEW NORTH LINE OF MYNATT ROAD, NORTH
29 DEG. 44 MIN. 32 SEC. WEST, 100 FEET TO
AN IRON PIN; THENCE WITH LOT 17, NORTH 56
DEG. 50 MIN, EAST, 109.62 FEET TO AN IRON
PIN CORNER TO PROPERTY OF GARY L. HUNLEY,
ET UX. OF RECORD IN DEED BOOK 2012, PAGE
152 IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE FOR KNOX
COUNTY, TENNESSEE; THENCE WITH THE SAID
GARY L. HUNLEY PROPERTY, SOUTH 30 DEG. 38
MIN. 24 SEC. EAST, 87.91 FEET TO AN IRON PIN
IN THE NORTHWEST LINE OF A TWELVE FOOT
JOINT PERMANENT EASEMENT; THENCE WITH
SAID JOINT PERMANENT EASEMENT, SOUTH
56 DEG. 50 MIN. WEST, 111 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING. THERE IS ALSO CONVEYED
HEREWITH AN EASEMENT TWELVE FEET IN
WIDTH ADJOINING THE SOUTHEASTERN LINE
OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED TRACT, SAID JOINT
PERMANENT EASEMENT WAS ESTABLISHED
IN DEED BOOK 864, PAGE 285 AND IS FOR
INGRESS AND EGRESS TO AND FROM MYNATT
ROAD AND THE INSTALLATION OF NECESSARY
UTILITIES. SUBJECT TO AN EXISTING SANITARY
SEWER- LINE CONVEYED TO KNOX COUNTY
WHICH IS LOCATED WITHIN THE TWELVE FOOT
JOINT PERMANENT EASEMENT HEREINABOVE
REFERRED TO.
Parcel ID: 048O-A-037.00
PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of
the property is believed to be 2252 MYNATT
RD, KNOXVILLE, TN 37918. In the event of
any discrepancy between this street address and
the legal description of the property, the legal
description shall control.
CURRENT OWNER(S): ROBERT JEARL
CRUMLEY and JR, Karen L Crumley
OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: The sale of
the above-described property shall be subject to all
matters shown on any recorded plat; any unpaid
taxes; any restrictive covenants, easements or
set-back lines that may be applicable; any prior
liens or encumbrances as well as any priority
created by a fixture filing; and to any matter that
an accurate survey of the premises might disclose.
This property is being sold with the express
reservation that it is subject to confirmation by
the lender or Substitute Trustee. This sale may
be rescinded at any time. The right is reserved to
adjourn the day of the sale to another day, time,
and place certain without further publication,
upon announcement at the time and place for
the sale set forth above. All right and equity of
redemption, statutory or otherwise, homestead,
and dower are expressly waived in said Deed of
Trust, and the title is believed to be good, but the
undersigned will sell and convey only as Substitute
Trustee. The Property is sold as is, where is,
without representations or warranties of any kind,
including fitness for a particular use or purpose.
THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT
A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute
Trustee 119 S. Main Street, Suite 500
Memphis, TN 38103
www.rubinlublin.com/property-listings.php
Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846
Ad #101152: 2016-08-01
2016-08-08, 2016-08-15
NOTICE OF
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms and
conditions of a Deed of Trust dated August 25,
2005, executed by WILLIAM EDWARD HOOPER,
JANELLE TURNER, conveying certain real property
therein described to EMMETT JAMES HOUSE
OR BILL R. MCLAUGHLIN, as Trustee, as same
appears of record in the Register’s Office of Knox
County, Tennessee recorded August 29, 2005, at
Instrument Number 200508290019042;
and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said
Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned to
REGIONS BANK D/B/A REGIONS MORTGAGE who
is now the owner of said debt;
and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Rubin Lublin
TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute
Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the
Register’s Office of Knox County, Tennessee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given
that the entire indebtedness has been declared
due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin
Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly
appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and
authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute
Trustee will, on September 8, 2016 at 10:00
AM at the City/County Lobby of the Knox County
Courthouse, located in Knoxville, Tennessee,
proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY,
the following described property situated in Knox
County, Tennessee, to wit:
SITUATED IN THE SEVENTH (7TH) CIVIL
DISTRICT OF KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, AND
WITHIN THE THIRTY- EIGHTH (38TH) WARD OF
THE CITY OF KNOXVILLE, BEING ALL OF LOT NO.
4 IN BLACK OAK CREST REVISED SUBDIVISION,
AS SHOWN BY MAP OF RECORD IN MAP BOOK
16, PAGE 139, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE FOR
KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, TO WHICH MAP
SPECIFIC REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE, AND
ACCORDING TO THE SURVEY OF G. T. TROTTER,
JR. SURVEYOR, DATED AUGUST 31, 1976. SAID
PROPERTY BEARS THE STREET ADDRESS OF
5722 SANFORD ROAD, KNOXVILLE, TN 37912.
THE ABOVE DESCRIPTION IS THE SAME AS THE
PREVIOUS DEED OF RECORD, NO BOUNDARY
SURVEY HAVING BEEN MADE AT THE TIME OF
THIS CONVEYANCE.
Parcel ID: 068DC004
PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of
the property is believed to be 5722 SANFORD
RD, KNOXVILLE, TN 37912. In the event of
any discrepancy between this street address and
the legal description of the property, the legal
description shall control.
CURRENT OWNER(S): WILLIAM EDWARD
HOOPER, JANELLE TURNER
OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: CAPITAL
ONE BANK, Tennessee Housing Development
Agency The sale of the above-described property
shall be subject to all matters shown on any
recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive
covenants, easements or set-back lines that may
be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances
as well as any priority created by a fixture filing;
and to any matter that an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose. This property is
being sold with the express reservation that it is
subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute
Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day, time, and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement at the
time and place for the sale set forth above. All right
and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise,
homestead, and dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is,
where is, without representations or warranties
of any kind, including fitness for a particular use
or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO
COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED
WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute Trustee
119 S. Main Street, Suite 500
Memphis, TN 38103
www.rubinlublin.com/property-listings.php
Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846
Ad #101407: 2016-08-08 201608-15, 2016-08-22
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE’S SALE
Sale at public auction will be on September
26, 2016 on or about 10:00AM local time, at the
North door, Knox County Courthouse, Knoxville,
Tennessee, conducted by the Substitute Trustee
as identified and set forth herein below, pursuant
to Deed of Trust executed by MICHAEL DOANE
AND JENNIFER DOANE, to DOC MOR TITLE,
Trustee, on October 3, 2011, as Instrument No.
201110200021450 in the real property records
of Knox County Register’s Office, Tennessee.
Owner of Debt: Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC
The following real estate located in Knox
County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call
bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and
encumbrances of record:
SITUATED IN DISTRICT NUMBER TWO (2)
OF KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE,. AND WITHIN
THE 16TH WARD OF THE CITY OF KNOXVILLE,
TENNESSEE, AND BEING KNOWN AND
DESIGNATED AS ALL OF LOT 285, FAIRMONT
PARK ADDITION, AS SHOWN ON THE MAP
OF THE SAME OF RECORD IN MAP BOOK 8,
PAGE 82, REGISTER`S OFFICE FOR KNOX
COUNTY, TENNESSEE, SAID PROPERTY BEING
BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED AS SHOWN ON
MAP AFORESAID ADDITION, TO WHICH MAP
REFERENCE IS MADE FOR A MORE PARTICULAR
DESCRIPTION; ACCORDING TO THE SURVEY OF
TROTTER AND MCCLELLAN, SURVEYOR, DATED
JULY 17, 1989.
BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO
MORANDMAX PROPERTIES, INC. BY QUIT CLAIM
DEED FROM SCOTT LUMPKIN, UNMARRIED
AND AVERY MORGAN, UNMARRIED, AS JOINT
TENANTS, DATED 2-19-09, RECORDED 2-2009, INSTRUMENT NO. 200902200051895, IN
THE REGISTER`S OFFICE OF KNOX COUNTY,
TENNESSEE.
BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED
TO SCOTT LUMPKIN AND AVERY MORGAN,
AS JOINT TENANTS, BY CASH DEED FROM
ALPHONSO JACKSON, SECRETARY OF HOUSING
AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT DATED APRIL
16, 2007 AND RECORDED INSTRUMENT NO.
200704230086497, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE
FOR KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE.
THIS PROPERTY IS NOT A MARITAL
RESIDENCE OF SCOTT LUMPKIN AND AVERY
MORGAN AND AS SUCH IS NOT SUBJECT TO
ANY HOMESTEAD, DOWER OR OTHER MARITAL
INTEREST AS CONTEMPLATED BY T.C.A 260-2307, OR OTHER SIMILAR STATUTE.
THIS CONVEYANCE IS MADE SUBJECT TO
ALL APPLICABLE EASEMENTS, RESTRICTIONS
AND BUILDING SET BACK LINES.
Tax ID: 069MD-018
Current Owner(s) of Property: MICHAEL
DOANE AND JENNIFER DOANE
The street address of the above described
property is believed to be 1924 SEYMOUR AVE.,
KNOXVILLE, TN 37917, but such address is not
part of the legal description of the property sold
herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the
legal description referenced herein shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO OCCUPANT(S) RIGHTS
IN POSSESSION.
THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN
THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY,
TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER
PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE
TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH
ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE.
IF THE SALE IS SET ASIDE FOR ANY REASON,
THE PURCHASER AT THE SALE SHALL BE
ENTITLED ONLY TO A RETURN OF THE DEPOSIT
PAID. THE PURCHASER SHALL HAVE NO
FURTHER RECOURSE AGAINST THE GRANTOR,
THE GRANTEE, OR THE TRUSTEE.
OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: None
THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT
AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A.
35-5-117 have been met.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and
otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee.
If the U.S. Department of Treasury/IRS, the
State of Tennessee Department of Revenue, or
the State of Tennessee Department of Labor or
Workforce Development are listed as Interested
Parties in the advertisement, then the Notice of
this foreclosure is being given to them and the
Sale will be subject to the applicable governmental
entities’ right to redeem the property as required
by 26 U.S.C. 7425 and T.C.A. §67-1-1433.
This property is being sold with the express
reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation
by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded
at any time. If the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to
a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
MWZM File No. 15-000564-670
JASON S. MANGRUM, JOHN R. ROAN, or
JERRY A. BRIDENBAUGH, Substitute Trustee(s)
Premier Building, Suite 404
5217 Maryland Way
Brentwood, Tennessee 37027
PHONE: (615) 238-3630
EMAIL: [email protected]
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE’S SALE
Sale at public auction will be on September
1, 2016 on or about 10:00AM local time,
at the North door, Knox County Courthouse,
Knoxville, Tennessee, conducted by the Substitute
Trustee as identified and set forth herein below,
pursuant to Deed of Trust executed by DENISE W.
HOWELL AND EDWARD R. HOWELL JR, to ROB
V. BUDHWA, Trustee, on November 30, 2005,
as Instrument No. 200512150052530 in the
real property records of Knox County Register’s
Office, Tennessee and re-filed as Instrument No.
200812180038271 in the real property records
of Knox County Register’s Office, Tennessee.
Owner of Debt: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE OF THE
FIELDSTONE MORTGAGE INVESTMENT TRUST,
SERIES 2006-1
The following real estate located in Knox
County, Tennessee, will be sold to the highest call
bidder subject to all unpaid taxes, prior liens and
encumbrances of record:
SITUATED IN DISTRICT NO. 8 OF KNOX
COUNTY, TENNESSEE AND WITHOUT THE
CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF KNOXVILLE,
TENNESSEE, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED
AS ALL OF LOT 2, BLOCK “E”, SPRINGPLACE
SUBDIVISION, UNIT 6, AS SHOWN BY MAP OF
THE SAME OF RECORD IN MAP BOOK 52-S,
PAGE 9, IN THE REGISTER`S OFFICE, OF KNOX
COUNTY, TENNESSEE, TO WHICH MAP SPECIFIC
REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE FOR A MORE
PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION AS SHOWN BY
SURVEY OF HUBERT BODENHEIMER, SURVEYOR,
TENNESSEE LICENCE NO. 1003, OF ACUFF AND
COLLIGNON & ASSOCIATES, 311 LYNNWOOD
DRIVE, KNOXVILLE, TN 37918, DATED APRIL
27, 1993.
Tax ID: 0600B01800
Current Owner(s) of Property: DENISE W.
HOWELL AND EDWARD R. HOWELL JR
The street address of the above described
property is believed to be 1715 PARKRIDGE
ROAD, KNOXVILLE, TN 37924, but such address
is not part of the legal description of the property
sold herein and in the event of any discrepancy, the
legal description referenced herein shall control.
SALE IS SUBJECT TO OCCUPANT(S) RIGHTS
IN POSSESSION.
THE RIGHT IS RESERVED TO ADJOURN
THE DAY OF THE SALE TO ANOTHER DAY,
TIME AND PLACE CERTAIN WITHOUT FURTHER
PUBLICATION, UPON ANNOUNCEMENT AT THE
TIME AND PLACE FOR THE SALE SET FORTH
ABOVE. THE TRUSTEE/SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE
RESERVES THE RIGHT TO RESCIND THE SALE.
IF THE SALE IS SET ASIDE FOR ANY REASON,
THE PURCHASER AT THE SALE SHALL BE
ENTITLED ONLY TO A RETURN OF THE DEPOSIT
PAID. THE PURCHASER SHALL HAVE NO
FURTHER RECOURSE AGAINST THE GRANTOR,
THE GRANTEE, OR THE TRUSTEE.
OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: MERS AND
INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE - UNITED STATES
TREASURY AND HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES
INC. - JUNIOR DOT AND CITIZENS BANK JUNIOR DOT AND MIDLAND FUNDING LLC AS
SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO GE CAPITAL
RETAIL BANK/JCPENNY AND ANESTHESIA
MEDICAL ALLIANCE OF E. TN AND TENNESSEE
DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE
THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT
AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE
USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
If applicable, the notice requirements of T.C.A.
35-5-117 have been met.
All right of equity of redemption, statutory and
otherwise, and homestead are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee.
This sale is also subject to the right of
redemption by the INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE/
DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY, pursuant to 26
U.S.C. 7425 by reason of the following tax lien(s)
of record in the original amount of $20,427.76 as
Instrument No. 201412300035376$9,504.09
as Instrument No. 201412300035377 in the
real property records of Knox County Register’s
Office, Tennessee.
If the U.S. Department of Treasury/IRS, the
State of Tennessee Department of Revenue, or
the State of Tennessee Department of Labor or
Workforce Development are listed as Interested
Parties in the advertisement, then the Notice of
this foreclosure is being given to them and the
Sale will be subject to the applicable governmental
entities’ right to redeem the property as required
by 26 U.S.C. 7425 and T.C.A. §67-1-1433.
This property is being sold with the express
reservation that the sale is subject to confirmation
by the lender or trustee. This sale may be rescinded
at any time. If the sale is set aside for any reason,
the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to
a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
MWZM File No. 16-001347-670
JASON S. MANGRUM, JOHN R. ROAN, or
JERRY A. BRIDENBAUGH, Substitute Trustee(s)
Premier Building, Suite 404
5217 Maryland Way
Brentwood, Tennessee 37027
PHONE: (615) 238-3630
EMAIL: [email protected]
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE
SALE
STATE OF TENNESSEE, KNOX COUNTY
WHEREAS, Betty Lynn York executed a Deed
of Trust to National City Mortgage a division of
National City Bank, Lender and John O. Rhea,
Trustee(s), which was dated March 28, 2008 and
recorded on March 31, 2008 in Instrument No.
200803310072744, Knox County, Tennessee
Register of Deeds.
WHEREAS, default having been made in the
payment of the debt(s) and obligation(s) thereby
secured by the said Deed of Trust and the
current holder of said Deed of Trust, PNC Bank,
National Association, (the “Holder”), appointed the
undersigned, Brock & Scott, PLLC, as Substitute
Trustee, by an instrument duly recorded in the
Office of the Register of Deeds of Knox County,
Tennessee, with all the rights, powers and
privileges of the original Trustee named in said
Deed of Trust; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that
the entire indebtedness has been declared due and
payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the
Holder, and that as agent for the undersigned,
Brock & Scott, PLLC, Substitute Trustee, by
virtue of the power and authority vested in it,
will on September 1, 2016, at 10:00AM at the
usual and customary location at the Knox County
Courthouse, Knoxville, Tennessee, proceed to sell
at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described property situated in
Knox County, Tennessee, to wit:
SITUATED in District No. Five of Knox County,
Tennessee, and within the 43rd Ward of the City
of Knoxville, being all of Lot No. 21 in Block F of
Mascarene Hills, Unit 7, a subdivision to Knox
County, Tennessee, as shown by map of record
in Map Book 71-S, page 41, Plat Cabinet E, Slide
381-D, in the Register’s Office for Knox County,
Tennessee, to which map specific reference is
hereby made for a more particular description
of said lot, and as shown by survey of Stanley
E. Hinds, Surveyor, dated May 28, 1986, No.
8605197.
BEING the same property conveyed to Betty
Lynn York, single, from Christopher Brandon York
and wife, Robin York, by Warranty Deed dated
March 28, 2008 recorded as Instrument Number
200803310072743, in the Register’s Office for
Knox County, Tennessee.
The above description is the same as the
previous deed of record, no boundary survey
having been made at the time of this conveyance.
THIS CONVEYANCE IS MADE SUBJECT
TO ANY AND ALL RESTRICTIONS, SETBACK
LINES AND EASEMENTS OF RECORD IN THE
REGISTER’S OFFICE FOR KNOX COUNTY,
TENNESSEE.
Parcel ID Number: 093IK-008
Address/Description: 4116 Mascarene Road,
Knoxville, TN 37921.
Current Owner(s): Christopher Brandon York.
Other Interested Party(ies): N/A
The sale of the property described above shall
be subject to all matters shown on any recorded
plat; any and all liens against said property for
unpaid property taxes; any restrictive covenants,
easements or set-back lines that may be
applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well
as any priority created by a fixture filing; a deed of
trust; and any matter than an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose; and
All right and equity of redemption, statutory
or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly
waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is
believed to be good, but the undersigned will
sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The
right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day, time, and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement at the
time and place for the sale set forth above.
This office is attempting to collect a debt.
Any information obtained will be used for that
purpose.
Brock & Scott, PLLC, Substitute Trustee
c/o Tennessee Foreclosure Department
6 Cadillac Drive, Suite 140
Brentwood, TN 37027
PH: 615-550-7697 FX: 615-550-8484
File No.: 15-20785 FC02
NOTICE OF
SUBSTITUTE
TRUSTEE’S SALE
WHEREAS, default has occurred in the
performance of the covenants, terms and
conditions of a Deed of Trust dated June 2,
2010, executed by CRISTY G. MCDANIEL, GREG
MCDANIEL, conveying certain real property therein
described to ANDREW C. RAMBO, as Trustee, as
same appears of record in the Register’s Office of
Knox County, Tennessee recorded June 9, 2010,
at Instrument Number 201006090076913;
and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of said
Deed of Trust was last transferred and assigned
to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, d/b/a
Christiana Trust, not individually but as trustee for
Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust who is now
the owner of said debt;
and WHEREAS, the undersigned, Rubin Lublin
TN, PLLC, having been appointed as Substitute
Trustee by instrument to be filed for record in the
Register’s Office of Knox County, Tennessee.
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given
that the entire indebtedness has been declared
due and payable, and that the undersigned, Rubin
Lublin TN, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee or his duly
appointed agent, by virtue of the power, duty and
authority vested and imposed upon said Substitute
Trustee will, on September 8, 2016 at 10:00
AM at the City/County Lobby of the Knox County
Courthouse, located in Knoxville, Tennessee,
proceed to sell at public outcry to the highest
and best bidder for cash or certified funds ONLY,
the following described property situated in Knox
County, Tennessee, to wit:
THE LAND HEREINAFTER REFERRED TO IS
SITUATED IN THE CITY OF POWELL, COUNTY
OF KNOX, STATE OF TN, AND IS DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: SITUATED IN DISTRICT NO. SIX (6)
OF KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, AND WITHOUT
THE CORPORATE LIMITS OF THE CITY OF
KNOXVILLE, BEING ALL OF LOT 1, BLOCK F, UNIT
3, WASHINGTON HEIGHTS ESTATES, AS SHOWN
ON THE MAP OF SAME OF RECORD IN MAP
BOOK 41-S, PAGE 32, REGISTER`S OFFICE FOR
KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE, AND BEING MORE
FULLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT
AN IRON PIN IN THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF
MACMONT CIRCLE, AT THE COMMON CORNER
BETWEEN LOTS 1 AND 2, THENCE ALONG
THE LINE OF LOT 2, NORTH 58 DEG. 04 MIN.
EAST 200 FEET TO AN IRON PIN IN THE LINE
OF PROPERTY NOW OR FORMERLY OWNED BY
BELL; THENCE ALONG SAID LINE SOUTH 31
DEG. 56 MIN. EAST 120 FEET TO AN IRON PIN
IN THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF A FUTURE
ROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID LINE, SOUTH 58
DEG. 04 MIN. WEST 200 FEET TO AN IRON PIN
IN THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF MACMONT
CIRCLE; THENCE ALONG SAID LINE, NORTH 31
DEG. 56 MIN. WEST 120 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING; EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT
PORTION LYING OUTSIDE THE CURVE AT THE
POINT OF INTERSECTION OF MACMONT CIRCLE
AND SAID FUTURE ROAD, ALL ACCORDING
TO THE SURVEY OF BATSON AND HIMES,
ENGINEERS, KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE, DATED
APRIL 13, 1967, AND REVISED SEPTEMBER
11, 1967. THIS PROPERTY IS SUBJECT TO
ALL APPLICABLE CONDITIONS, COVENANTS,
RESERVATIONS, EASEMENTS, CHARGES, LIENS,
LEASES, PERMISSIVE USE AGREEMENTS AND
RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD IN BOOK OR PLAT
IN THE AFORESAID COUNTY REGISTER OF
DEEDS` OFFICE. SUBJECT TO GOVERNMENTAL
ZONING AND SUBDIVISION ORDINANCES
AND REGULATIONS IN EFFECT THEREON.
SUBJECT TO ALL APPLICABLE EASEMENTS,
RESTRICTIONS, BUILDING LINES, CONDITIONS
AND MATTERS OF RECORD.
Parcel ID: 0066FA-013
PROPERTY ADDRESS: The street address of
the property is believed to be 4821 MACMONT
CIRCLE, POWELL, TN 37849. In the event of
any discrepancy between this street address and
the legal description of the property, the legal
description shall control.
CURRENT OWNER(S): CRISTY G. MCDANIEL,
GREG MCDANIEL
OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES: HALLSDALE
POWELL UTILITY DISTRICT, SECRETARY
OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT,
SPRINGLEAF FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.
The sale of the above-described property
shall be subject to all matters shown on any
recorded plat; any unpaid taxes; any restrictive
covenants, easements or set-back lines that may
be applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances
as well as any priority created by a fixture filing;
and to any matter that an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose. This property is
being sold with the express reservation that it is
subject to confirmation by the lender or Substitute
Trustee. This sale may be rescinded at any time.
The right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day, time, and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement at the
time and place for the sale set forth above. All right
and equity of redemption, statutory or otherwise,
homestead, and dower are expressly waived in
said Deed of Trust, and the title is believed to be
good, but the undersigned will sell and convey only
as Substitute Trustee. The Property is sold as is,
where is, without representations or warranties
of any kind, including fitness for a particular use
or purpose. THIS LAW FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO
COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED
WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.
Rubin Lublin TN, PLLC, Substitute Trustee
119 S. Main Street, Suite
500 Memphis, TN 38103
www.rubinlublin.com/property-listings.php
Tel: (877) 813-0992 Fax: (404) 601-5846
Ad #101182: 2016-08-08 201608-15, 2016-08-22
NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
STATE OF TENNESSEE, KNOX COUNTY
WHEREAS, Brian Keith Gibson And Hattie B.
Gibson executed a Deed of Trust to CitiFinancial
Services, Inc., Lender and B. Darnell, Trustee(s),
which was dated August 21, 2008 and
recorded on August 25, 2008 in Instrument No.
200808250013407, Knox County, Tennessee
Register of Deeds.
WHEREAS, default having been made in the
payment of the debt(s) and obligation(s) thereby
secured by the said Deed of Trust and the current
holder of said Deed of Trust, CitiFinancial Servicing
LLC, (the “Holder”), appointed the undersigned,
Brock & Scott, PLLC, as Substitute Trustee, by
an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the
Register of Deeds of Knox County, Tennessee,
with all the rights, powers and privileges of the
original Trustee named in said Deed of Trust; and
NOW, THEREFORE, notice is hereby given that
the entire indebtedness has been declared due and
payable as provided in said Deed of Trust by the
Holder, and that as agent for the undersigned,
Brock & Scott, PLLC, Substitute Trustee, by
virtue of the power and authority vested in it,
will on August 30, 2016, at 10:00AM at the
usual and customary location at the Knox County
Courthouse, Knoxville, Tennessee, proceed to sell
at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for
cash, the following described property situated in
Knox County, Tennessee, to wit:
SITUATED IN DISTRICT NO 12 OF KNOX
COUNTY, TENNESSEE, BEING ALL OF LOTS NO
1 AND 2 IN BLOCK O DESIGNATED ON THE MAP
OF GLENWOOD PARK ADDITION TO THE CITY
OF KNOXVILLE, TO WHICH REFERENCE IS MADE
FOR A MORE PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION. TAX
ID: 093 JC-030
BEING THE SAME FEE SIMPLE PROPERTY
CONVEYED BY QUIT CLAIM DEED FROM
GARLAND GIBSON TO BRIAN KEITH GIBSON,
DATED 3/4/2003 RECORDED ON 3/4/2003
IN INSTRUMENT NO 200303040077750, IN
KNOX COUNTY RECORDS, STATE OF TN. ALSO
CONVEYED WITH PROPERTY IS A 2001 CLAY
M.H. VIN N01027481TNAB
Parcel ID Number: 093JC030
Address/Description: 2610 Parkwood Road,
Knoxville, TN 37912.
Current Owner(s): Brian Keith Gibson.
Other Interested Party(ies): N/A
The sale of the property described above shall
be subject to all matters shown on any recorded
plat; any and all liens against said property for
unpaid property taxes; any restrictive covenants,
easements or set-back lines that may be
applicable; any prior liens or encumbrances as well
as any priority created by a fixture filing; a deed of
trust; and any matter than an accurate survey of
the premises might disclose; and
All right and equity of redemption, statutory
or otherwise, homestead, and dower are expressly
waived in said Deed of Trust, and the title is
believed to be good, but the undersigned will
sell and convey only as Substitute Trustee. The
right is reserved to adjourn the day of the sale
to another day, time, and place certain without
further publication, upon announcement at the
time and place for the sale set forth above.
This office is attempting to collect a debt.
Any information obtained will be used for that
purpose.
Brock & Scott, PLLC, Substitute Trustee
c/o Tennessee Foreclosure Department
6 Cadillac Drive, Suite 140
Brentwood, TN 37027
PH: 615-550-7697 FX: 615-550-8484
File No.: 16-09534 FC01
Reserve
your legal or
public notice
by emailing
legals@
knoxfocus.
com or calling
(865) 6869970.
August 15, 2016
www.knoxfocus.com
What are you worshiping?
When we
you kidding? I
think of idols,
don’t worship
we picture
any idol nor do I
statues from
know someone
ancient cultures
who worships
and religions.
an idol.”
We often
God said, “So
By Mark
think of natural
do not corrupt
Brackney,
objects like
yourselves by
Minister of the
trees or rocks, or
making an idol
Arlington Church
something carved of Christ
in any form—
to represent
whether of
the object that
a man or a
is being worshiped. If
woman, an animal on
I were to ask if you
the ground, a bird in
practiced idolatry today,
the sky, a small animal
you likely would say, “Are
that scurries along the
ground, or a fish in the
deepest sea. And when
you look up into the sky
and see the sun, moon,
and stars—all the forces
of heaven—don’t be
seduced into worshiping
them” (Deut. 4:16-19).
God speaks these
words through Moses
when the children of
Israel are about to enter
into the Promised Land.
They would be tempted
with worshiping the idols
of the Canaanites, much
like they were tempted
to worship the various
idols of Egypt when
they were enslaved.
Idolatry is a major
issue in the Bible. In
fact, more than fifty
laws in the first five
books are aimed at this
issue. In all of Judaism,
it was one of only four
sins in which the death
penalty was attached.
When we read this
passage today, these
things seem silly to us
because they have no
bearing on the world
we live in. Or do they?
An idol is anything
that battles for a
place of control in our
lives. Idolatry is taking
anything and making it
more important than it
should be. A.B. Simpson
said, “As long as you
want anything very much,
especially more than you
want God, it is an idol.”
What if idols take forms
that are so ordinary that
we don’t recognize them
as gods at all? What
if we do our “kneeling”
and our “bowing” with
our checkbooks,
our calendars, or
our social media?
What is it that you
need to make you
happy? Many people
think it is a relationship.
For others it is having
the right car or living in
the right neighborhood.
It could be an
impressive job or title.
It might be a certain
amount of money in
the bank. This thing
you wish and desire is
likely taking the place
of God in your life.
Are you possibly
placing too much value
on something that is
not that important?
Are we worshipping
something besides God?
Is there anything
worth more than having
a growing passion
for our loving God?
No, there is not.
God said, “You shall
have no other gods
before me. You shall
not make for yourself
an image in the form
of anything in heaven
above or on the earth
beneath or in the waters
below. You shall not bow
down to them or worship
them” (Exodus 20:3-5).
God wants to be first in
our lives, above all else.
So if there is something
in your life that is pushing
God out, remove it.
Once idols are torn
down, you are ready for
God to come into your
life and you will develop
a strong passion for
Him. Fill your hungry
soul up with God in
worship (Psalm 107:9).
PAGE D3
KCHD seeking
parental
feedback on
its in-school
influenza
vaccination
program
Cont. from page 1
only a recommendation
regarding the nasal spray
vaccine; the injectable flu
vaccine or flu shot continues to demonstrate effectiveness in preventing flu,”
added Dr. Cooper. “Our
decision to offer only the flu
shot is based on this new
evidence because we want
to offer the most effective
option.”
For more than 10 years,
KCHD has partnered with
Knox County elementary
and middle schools, private schools, Head Starts,
and child care facilities to
offer flu vaccination to eligible children in the school
setting. On average, KCHD
has vaccinated approximately 45 percent of Knox
County’s school-aged children each year. This program is a national model
for community flu prevention. Importantly, evidence
supports vaccinating children as a way to protect
the entire community from
influenza.
auto, Home,
commercial and
life Insurance
WHERE OUR CUSTOMERS
ARE THE SUPERSTAR!
Glenn Jacobs
owner/agent
6918 neal chase Way
Knoxville, Tn 37918
(865) 622-4576
Legal & public notices
COURT
NOTICES
NON-RESIDENT
NOTICE
TO: UNKNOWN FATHER,
IN RE: AVA MARIE THORNTON
NO. 192031-3
IN THE CHANCERY COURT FOR
KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE
In this Cause, it appearing from the Complaint
filed, which is sworn to, that the Defendant,
UNKNOWN FATHER, a non-resident of the State
of Tennessee, or whose whereabouts cannot be
ascertained upon diligent search and inquiry, so
that the ordinary process of law cannot be served
upon UNKNOWN FATHER.
It is Ordered that said Defendant, UNKNOWN
FATHER, file an Answer with the Clerk and Master
of the Chancery Court in Knoxville, Tennessee
and with Joseph Della-Rodolfa, an attorney
whose address is 120 Suburban Road, Ste. 203,
Knoxville, TN 37923 within thirty (30) days of the
last date of publication or a judgment by default
will be taken against you and the cause will be set
for hearing Ex-Parte as to you before Chancellor
Michael Moyers at the Knox County Chancery
Court, Division III, 400 Main Street, Knoxville,
Tennessee 37902. This notice will be published
in The Knoxville Focus newspaper for four (4)
consecutive weeks.
This 26th day of July, 2016.
/s/HOWARD G. HOGAN
Clerk and Master
To be published: 8/01/2016, 8/8/2016,
8/15/2016 and 8/22/2016
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Estate of
KIMBERLY RENEE GRUBB
Docket Number 77927-1
Notice is hereby given that on the 2nd day of
August, 2016, letters testamentary in respect of
the Estate of KIMBERLY RENEE GRUBB, who died
May 8, 2016, were issued the undersigned by the
Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court of Knox
County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and nonresident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against his or her estate are required to file the
same with the Clerk and Master of the above
named court on or before the earlier of the dates
prescribed in (1) or (2) otherwise their claims will
be forever barred.
(1) (A) Four (4) months from the date of the
first publication of this notice if the creditor
received an actual copy of this notice to creditors
at least sixty (60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of this first publication;
or (B) Sixty (60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice to creditors
if the creditor received the copy of the notice less
than sixty (60) days prior to the date that is four
(4) months from the date of first publication as
described in (1) (A); or
(2) Twelve (12) months from the decedent’s
date of death
This the 2nd day of August, 2016
Estate of KIMBERLY RENEE GRUBB
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE(S)
MIKEL GLENN GRUBB, Administrator
4288 Steamboat Rd
Lexington, KY 40514
AMANDA M. BUSBY
Attorney at Law
PO Box 2588
Knoxville, TN 37901-2588
PUBLISH: 8/15/2016 and 8/22/2016
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Estate of
MARK ALLEN McKINNEY
Docket Number 77502-2
Notice is hereby given that on the 4th day of
August, 2016, letters testamentary in respect of
the Estate of MARK ALLEN McKINNEY, who died
Feb 10, 2016, were issued the undersigned by the
Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court of Knox
County, Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-
resident, having claims, matured or unmatured,
against his or her estate are required to file the
same with the Clerk and Master of the above
named court on or before the earlier of the dates
prescribed in (1) or (2) otherwise their claims will
be forever barred.
(1) (A) Four (4) months from the date of the
first publication of this notice if the creditor
received an actual copy of this notice to creditors
at least sixty (60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of this first publication;
or (B) Sixty (60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice to creditors
if the creditor received the copy of the notice less
than sixty (60) days prior to the date that is four
(4) months from the date of first publication as
described in (1) (A); or
(2) Twelve (12) months from the decedent’s
date of death
This the 4th day of August, 2016
Estate of MARK ALLEN McKINNEY
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE(S)
MATTHEW McKINNEY, Co-Administrator
915 Goodbar Court
Nashville, TN 37217
JESSICA L. McKINNEY, Co-Administrator
904 Enclave Circle
Nashville, TN 37211
PUBLISH: 8/15/2016 and 8/22/2016
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Estate of
GERALD OSTRO McPHETRIDGE
Docket Number 77955-2
Notice is hereby given that on the 3rd day of
August, 2016, letters testamentary in respect of
the Estate of GERALD OSTRO McPHETRIDGE,
who died Dec 1, 2015, were issued the undersigned
by the Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court of
Knox County, Tennessee. All persons, resident
and non-resident, having claims, matured or
unmatured, against his or her estate are required
to file the same with the Clerk and Master of the
above named court on or before the earlier of the
dates prescribed in (1) or (2) otherwise their claims
will be forever barred.
(1) (A) Four (4) months from the date of the
first publication of this notice if the creditor
received an actual copy of this notice to creditors
at least sixty (60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of this first publication;
or (B) Sixty (60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice to creditors
if the creditor received the copy of the notice less
than sixty (60) days prior to the date that is four
(4) months from the date of first publication as
described in (1) (A); or
(2) Twelve (12) months from the decedent’s
date of death
This the 3rd day of August, 2016
Estate of GERALD OSTRO McPHETRIDGE
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE(S)
BRENDA R. McPHETRIDGE, Executrix
4322 OHara Drive
Knoxville, TN 37918
WENDELL K. HALL
Attorney at Law
7045 Maynardville Pike
Knoxville, TN 37918
PUBLISH: 8/15/2016 and 8/22/2016
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Estate of
BRUCE E. WEBB, JR.
Docket Number 77949-2
Notice is hereby given that on the 2nd day of
August, 2016, letters testamentary in respect of
the Estate of BRUCE E. WEBB, JR., who died May
4, 2016, were issued the undersigned by the Clerk
and Master of the Chancery Court of Knox County,
Tennessee. All persons, resident and non-resident,
having claims, matured or unmatured, against his
or her estate are required to file the same with the
Clerk and Master of the above named court on or
before the earlier of the dates prescribed in (1) or
(2) otherwise their claims will be forever barred.
(1) (A) Four (4) months from the date of the
first publication of this notice if the creditor
received an actual copy of this notice to creditors
at least sixty (60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of this first publication;
or (B) Sixty (60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice to creditors
if the creditor received the copy of the notice less
than sixty (60) days prior to the date that is four
(4) months from the date of first publication as
described in (1) (A); or
(2) Twelve (12) months from the decedent’s
date of death
This the 2nd day of August, 2016
Estate of BRUCE E. WEBB, JR.
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE(S)
NANCY DESHANE WEBB, Executrix
7869 Scenic Oaks Road
Knoxville, TN 37938
SHARON FRANKENBERG
Attorney at Law
PO Box 31585
Knoxville, TN 37930
PUBLISH: 8/15/2016 and 8/22/2016
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
Estate of
THELMA JUANITA WOLFE
Docket Number 77971-3
Notice is hereby given that on the 9th day of
August, 2016, letters testamentary in respect of
the Estate of THELMA JUANITA WOLFE, who
died Jun 26, 2016, were issued the undersigned
by the Clerk and Master of the Chancery Court
of Knox County, Tennessee. All persons, resident
and non-resident, having claims, matured or
unmatured, against his or her estate are required
to file the same with the Clerk and Master of the
above named court on or before the earlier of the
dates prescribed in (1) or (2) otherwise their claims
will be forever barred.
(1) (A) Four (4) months from the date of the
first publication of this notice if the creditor
received an actual copy of this notice to creditors
at least sixty (60) days before the date that is four
(4) months from the date of this first publication;
or (B) Sixty (60) days from the date the creditor
received an actual copy of the notice to creditors
if the creditor received the copy of the notice less
than sixty (60) days prior to the date that is four
(4) months from the date of first publication as
described in (1) (A); or
(2) Twelve (12) months from the decedent’s
date of death
This the 9th day of August, 2016
Estate of THELMA JUANITA WOLFE
PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE(S)
WILLIAM C. WOLFE, III, Executor
724 Martha Lane
Knoxville, TN 37912
SCOTT B. HAHN
Attorney at Law
5344 N. Broadway, Ste. 101
Knoxville, TN 37918
PUBLISH: 8/15/2016 and 8/22/2016
Misc.
Notices
Legal Section 94
Knox County will receive bids for the following
items & services:
Bid 2429, Powell Middle School Sidewalks,
due 08-31-16;
RFP 2431, Cultural Competency Training, due
08-31-16;
Bid 2432, Presort Mailing Services, due 0830-16
For additional information call 865-215-5777,
stop by the Purchasing Division, 1000 North
Central St., Suite 100, Knoxville, TN 37917,
or visit our website: www.knoxcounty.org/
purchasing. To bid on Knox County surplus items,
go to www.govdeals.com.
NOTICE OF AUCTION
The owner and/or lien holders of the following
vehicles are hereby notified of their rights to pay
all charges and reclaim said vehicles being held at
Clinton Hwy Service Center,5929 Clinton Hwy,
Knoxville, TN 37912. Failure to reclaim these
vehicles will be deemed a waiver of all rights, title
and consent to dispose of said vehicle at Public
Auction on August 18, 2016 9am.
2002 Toyota Camry 4 dr. black
4t1bf32k34u081898.
The Knoxville Focus
PAGE D4
August 15, 2016
service Directory
alterations
Caregiving
JOANNE’s ALTERATIONS
PANTS HEMMING $5,
SPECIALIZING IN JEANS CALL
JOANNE 579-2254
CAREGIVER: IN YOUR HOME;
HOURLY: 24-HR SPECIAL RATE.
EXCELLENT REFERENCES, 20
YRS EXP. PHONE: 312-5817
Caregiving
carpet
cleaning
I AM A CNA AVAILABLE TO
WORK WITH ELDERLY.
382-4443
Ceramic TIle
Installation
CHILD CARE
Electrician
classifieds
2 CEMETERY PLOTS HIGHLAND
SOUTH GARDEN CROSS,
$2200/EA 865-719-2143 OR
865-250-5047
real estate
for rent
fOUNTAIN CITY N. KNOXVILLE
1 & 2 BDRM APARTMENTS,
FROM $450.+ www.
knoxapartments.net
CALL TENANT’S CHOICesm
(865) 637-9118
storage
Handyman and Son
Painting, drywall,
plumbing, Pressure
washing, gutter cleaning,
carpentry, flooring. Your
helping hand around the
house. (865) 242-6699 Bob
or (865) 219-1704
home
improvement
Swim Lessons
Swim Lessons: Youth &
painting
PAINTING: Interior and
Exterior. All types repair.
Free estimates. Call
James Barnes, 454-3633
Adult Swim Classes. New
Classes begin each month.
Call the Jump Start
Program at Associated
Therapeutics for more
information. 687-4537
tree services
fencing
FENCING AND REPAIR: YOU
BUY IT, WE INSTALL IT.
604-6911
Cemetery
plots
metal work
CERAMIC TILE INSTALLATION:
FLOORS, WALLS, REPAIRS. 37
YEARS EXPERIENCE. JOHN:
938-3328
$28/ROOM;
3 ROOMS MINIMUM.
CALL EDD, (865) 705-8501
real estate
for rent
handymen
flooring
junk removal
LESTER’S
JUNK-AWAY
Garage, Carport, Basement
Cleaning & hauling junk away.
Call for free estimate
865-360-3457 (ask for Ernie)
florist
POWELL FLORIST AND
GIFTS 865-947-6105
POWELLFLORISTKNOXVILLE.
NET
gutter
work
gUTTER CLEANING,
INSTALLATION OF 5 INCH AND
REPAIR OF FASCIA BOARD
936-5907
lawn care
CEDAR RiDGE LAWN &
LANDSCAPE OWNER/
OPERATOR SEAN RAKES
776-8838 CEDARRIDGELAWN@
YAHOO.COM
Total Lawn
Complete Landscaping
Mowing * Maintenance
Irrigation
865- 661-3316
plumbing
Big Dawg Plumbing
Drain Cleaning, Sewer
Septic Water etc
363-9877
pressure
washing
WASH GREEN, BLACK AND
DIRT AWAY FROM VINYL
SIDING, GUTTERS, WALKWAYS
AND DRIVEWAYS. CALL EDD,
(865)705-8501
water
proofing

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