Home and Honey House Inspections Vy Goddard September 18, 2014

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Home and Honey House Inspections
Vy Goddard
September 18, 2014
About Me:
 Bachelors in biology and masters in food microbiology from VT
 Worked at the VA State Lab in Richmond
 Now, working as a Food Safety Specialist with VA Dept. of Agriculture
 Spotsylvania, Fredericksburg, Stafford, Louisa, Orange and Caroline
 Keep bees and chickens
 Keep a home garden
 Experiment with making beehive products
Types of Firms VDACS Inspects
 Retail Food Industry
 Supermarkets
 Convenience Stores & Grocery Stores
 Bakery Shops
 Meat Markets
 Seafood Markets
 Ethnic Markets
 Specialty Stores
 Drug Stores
 Farmers Markets
Types of Firms VDACS Inspects
 Processed Foods Industry
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Home Operations
Seafood
Baked goods
Beverages
Candy
Bottled Water
Spices
Ethnic Foods
Ice
Sandwiches
Fruit and Vegetable Processors (produce, sprouts, etc.)
Alcoholic Beverages (i.e. wineries, breweries)
Other Food Processors (everything but dairy & meat products)
Types of Firms VDACS Inspects
 Food Warehouses
 Multiple Foods Facilities
 Cold & Frozen Storage Facilities
 Beverage Facilities
 Food Salvage Facilities
 Other Facilities
 Restaurants and food service institutions are inspected by the
Virginia Department of Health
Food Manufacturing
Adopted from the FDA Code of Federal Regulations (21CFR)
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Part 100, General.
Part 101, Food labeling.
Part 102, Common or usual name for non-standardized foods.
Part 104, Nutritional quality guidelines for foods.
Part 105, Foods for special dietary use.
Part 109, Unavoidable contaminants in food for human consumption and food packaging material.
Part 110, Current good manufacturing practice in manufacturing, packing or holding human food.
Part 111, Current good manufacturing practice for dietary supplements.
Part 113, Thermally processed low-acid foods packaged in hermetically sealed containers.
Part 114, Acidified foods.
Part 120, Juice HACCP
Part 123, Seafood HACCP
Part 129, Processing and bottling of bottled drinking water.
Part 133, Cheeses and related cheese products.
Exemptions
 Honey producers
 Home food manufacturers (food type
dependent)
 Poultry processors
 Egg producers
Exempt Guidelines
 The exemption states that these types of operations do not have to have
an inspection by VDACS prior to operating
 They are also exempt from inspection fee
 However,
 Processors must still follow the Virginia Food Laws and related
regulations
 VDACS can inspect if there is a reason to (i.e. consumer complaint,
foodborne illness outbreak, etc)
Exempt Private Home Honey Processors
VA Food Law § 3.2-5130 (5)
 Private homes that process and prepare honey produced by his own hives
 Resident must sell less than 250 gallons of honey annually
 Labeling requirements:
 Name, telephone number, and address of the processor, name of the product,
net weight
 Product must be labeled “PROCESSED AND PREPARED WITHOUT STATE
INSPECTION. WARNING: Do not Feed Honey to Infants Under One Year
Old.”
 Residents do NOT need to certify in writing annually (new with the 2013
Food Laws)
 No restrictions regarding where the products can be sold and who they may be
sold to
Exempt Private Home Food Processors
VA Food Law § 3.2-5130 (3)
 Private homes where the resident processes and prepares candies, jams, and jellies not considered to
be low-acid or acidified low-acid food products, dried fruits, dry herbs, dry seasonings, dry
mixtures, coated and uncoated nuts, vinegars and flavored vinegars, popcorn, popcorn balls,
cotton candy, dried pasta, dry baking mixes, roasted coffee, dried tea, cereals, trail mixes,
granola, and baked goods that do not require time or temperature control after preparation if such
products are
 sold to an individual for their own consumption and not for resale
 sold at the private home or at farmers markets
 not offered for sale to be used in or offered for consumption in retail food establishments
 not offered for sale over the Internet or in interstate commerce
 affixed with a label displaying the name, physical address, and telephone number of the person
preparing the food product, the date the food product was processed, ingredient statement, and net
weight AND
 labeled “NOT FOR RESALE- PROCESSED AND PREPARED WITHOUT STATE INSPECTION”
Special Exemption for Poultry
 Anyone who slaughters and processes less than 1,000 poultry in a calendar
year is exempt from the Poultry Products Inspection Act (PPIA)
 These poultry must have been raised on his/her own farm and sold within
Virginia
 Up to 20,000 birds may be slaughtered/processed annually with periodic
inspection
 Contact the Office of Meat and Poultry (804-786-4569) to get an
application
Special Exemption for Eggs
 Producers selling a total of 150 dozen eggs or less per week produced by
their own hens or eggs purchased from other producers not to exceed 60
dozen per week are exempt from the Virginia Egg Law
 All eggs must be of edible quality and clean
 Held at 45 degrees F or less at all times
 Labeled with: safe handling instructions, name and address of packer,
grade or “ungraded”, name of product
Inspected Home and Honey
House Operations
 Honey producers that do not meet the
exemption or wish to be inspected for
other reasons
 Home food manufactures that do not
meet the exemption because type of food
produced or want to sell retail and
wholesale
To Be Under Inspection
 Interested parties should call the Regional Office associated with
their area or the Richmond Office
 They are sent a Information Request Sheet for a Food Processing
Operation
 “Home Op Packet” for starting a food business
 Even if the business is not a home-operation they may need to follow some of
the same steps
Starting a Food Manufacturing Operation
 Home op packet
 Review of facility (diagram of kitchen or processing area)
 Flow diagram of receipt, processing, and storage of products
Ingredient suppliers and sources
 Includes storage areas for ingredients and finished products
 Cook temperatures and times
 Transport conditions (cleanliness and temperature)
 Label review
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 Pets in the home and separation from food processing and storage areas
 Zoning approval for the location as a food processing operation
 Safe water source
Reviewing the Packet
 After the operator has completed the packet, they mail two (2)
copies in to the pertinent Regional Office
 The Regional Manager in that office reviews the packet
 Once approved:
 Pre-opening consultation with regional inspector
sampling
 $40/year fee
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 Some processors may need to meet requirements as outlined in
the CFRs (acidified foods, LACF, HACCP plans, etc)
Where Can Products Produced in an
Inspected Home Kitchen be Sold?
 VDACS allows these products to be sold ANYWHERE!!!!
 From the home (if zoning permits)
 Delivery to the customer’s home (if zoning permits)
 Over the internet
 To other retail establishments
 To other wholesale establishments
 Farmers Markets
 Restaurants
Products that May Not Be Produced in the
Private Home Kitchen
 Bottled Water – regulations require a separate bottling area
 Low Acid Canned Foods – operator would need to have a commercial retort installed
The Five (5) Foodborne Illness Risk Factors
The CDC has identified the top five risk factors that most often are
responsible for foodborne illness outbreaks as:
1. Food from Unsafe Sources
2. Inadequate Cooking
3. Improper Holding/Time-Temp abuse
4. Contaminated Equipment
5. Poor Personal Hygiene
Commonly Missed During an Inspection
 Proper hair restraints (hair nets, beard guards, caps, etc.)
 No hand & wrist jewelry, no dangling earrings
 Probe thermometer (ranging from 0 – 200 F)
 Sanitizing solution (bleach is perfectly fine) and appropriate test strips
to test the concentration of the sanitizing solution
Sanitizer
 Approved sanitizer must be provided for sanitizing
food contact surfaces
 Sanitizers must be used at appropriate strengths as
specified by manufacturer
 Soak clean, rinsed items in sanitizing solution for at
least 15 seconds and then AIR DRY
 An approved test kit to measure sanitizer
concentrations must be available and used
Sanitizer and Test Strips
Labels:
 Name of the product
 Net weight statement (contact the Department of Weights and Measures
for more info 804-786-2476)
 Name, address, and phone number of the manufacturer or distributor
 Ingredient listing
 Date food was processed
Personal Hygiene
 Practice good personal hygiene
 Clean outer garments, effective hair restraints, no smoking, eating,
or drinking
 Do not handle food while you are sick
Timely Handwashing
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Before beginning work
After the restroom
After blowing or touching nose
After handling raw meats and eggs
After eating, drinking and smoking
After any other potential hand soiling
activity (clearing dishes from tables,
mopping floors, etc.)
Exempt Private Home Honey Processors
VA Food Law § 3.2-5130 (5)
 Private homes that process and prepare honey produced by his own hives
 Resident must sell less than 250 gallons of honey annually
 Labeling requirements:
 Name, telephone number, and address of the processor, name of the product,
net weight
 Product must be labeled “PROCESSED AND PREPARED WITHOUT STATE
INSPECTION. WARNING: Do not Feed Honey to Infants Under One Year
Old.”
 Residents do NOT need to certify in writing annually (new with the 2013
Food Laws)
 No restrictions regarding where the products can be sold and who they may be
sold to
Contact Information
VDACS General Website www.vdacs.virginia.gov
Richmond Central Office (804) 786-3520
Vy Goddard
[email protected]
(804) 366-7330

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