Workshop Descriptions

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Workshop Descriptions
Bring Your ASL to Life! Intro to Depiction and Personification
This workshop provides interactive lecture and group activities equipping participants to:
Identify instances of, or opportunities to use personification; construct target language (ASL)
utterances of personification; understand the implications of incorporating personification into
her/his own ASL work. Entirely in ASL only; no English interpretation will be provided.
Target Audience: Professionals who work with American Sign Language and wish to examine
and mindfully incorporate use of personification into their own ASL work.
CEUs: 0.4 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
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Recall at least five main points from the presenter’s interactive lectures.
Recognize at least three examples of personification in everyday work environments.
Distinguish ASL depiction from ASL personification.
Identify five steps that can be used to transfer personification from English to ASL.
Construct three examples of ASL personification using the identified five steps.
Describe at least three effects of ASL personification.
Team Interpreting: Making Each Other Look Good
Team interpreting is the utilization of two or more interpreters who support each other to meet
the needs of a particular communication situation. This workshop analyzes the roles,
responsibilities, and various duties of both interpreters involved in a teaming situation.
Target Audience: students of interpreting and professional interpreters
CEUs: 0.2 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. List the 5 different types of feeds used in team interpreting.
2. Discuss the personal and professional benefits of team interpreting.
3. Identify their personal preferences for receiving feeds.
Special Issues on Visual Analytics and Visual Semantics
Language teachers / persons must also bring together ingredients. Since ASL is a visual
language, naturally those ingredients will be visual. Are there secret ingredients for success?
Our visual ingredients include: Facial Expressions, Gestures, Mouthings, Classifiers, Surrogates,
ASL structures (Depicting---­‐Nouns & Verbs), Body Shift, Space, Vocabulary, Fingerspelling
and The five C’s of Foreign Language Education (Communication, Cultures, Connections,
Comparisons and Communities). Video shows language in use helps students with Contextual
clues based on facial expressions, gestures and provides fascinating Cultural information about
places, things and people where the languages we teach are signed
Target Audience: from provisional to professional / Beginner to Advanced
CEUs: 0.25 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. Review the effect of limited exposure to language and the impact it has on development of a
first or native language
2. Discuss matching/meeting the individual communication needs of students
3. Practice and explore combining “ingredients” for increasing visual access to classroom
interpretations
Breaking form with Targeted Translation
This workshop is designed to help novice interpreters begin to identify structures in an
English source message that signal the use of ASL structures such as role shifting, listing and
use of space. The presenter will review these targeted ASL structures and lead participants
through a series of exercises to help them incorporate these structures into their
interpretation.
Target Audience: Advanced interpreting students
CEUs: 0.25 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives
1. Explain the targeted structures in ASL: role shifting, listing and use of space
2. Identify activities they can do to reduce interference from English in their interpretations
3. Identify structures in English that signal when the interpreter should use the ASL
structures role shift, listing and use of space
Introduction to Video Remote Interpreting
During this workshop we will compare
and contrast the differences & similarities between VRS,
VRI and Face to Face Community interpreting. We will look at how technology impacts VRI
work and service provision and experience a VRI demonstration. Through group discussion, we
will explore the contexts in which VRI is an appropriate means of service provision; and
discover how demand-control schema can be applied to VRI work.
Target Audience: Interpreting Students and working interpreters interested in VRI work.
CEUs: 0.15 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have little/no knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. Identify the differences in service provision between video remote interpreting (VRI),
video relay interpreting (VRS) and Face to Face (community) interpreting.
2. Explain how technology impacts VRI service provision.
3. List at least three demands and controls in VRI work
Equal Access: Making Sound Choices
This workshop will familiarize the participants with the parameters of a sign, and the process of
choosing signs which have the best visual effect when interpreting songs or poems in order to
make music and rhyming more meaningful for a deaf audience. Working in small groups, the
participants will choose a song and apply their newly acquired knowledge. Given some time to
work together, they will then present it for the whole group.
Target Audience: interpreting/signing students and/or professionals in the field; must have some
working sign vocabulary
CEUs: 0.2 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. List and define the parameters of a sign and generate examples for each.
2. Develop an appreciation for the complexity of translating/interpreting lyrics and making music
or “Hearing” poetry more accessible to deaf people.
3. Develop a working knowledge of the process to make music/sounds visually appealing to a
deaf audience.
How To Interpret for a MLS or Semi-lingual Deaf Client
Participants will be able to identify Minimum Language Skill (MLS) or Semi-lingual Deaf client.
Various approaches and interpretation strategies would be presented. Educational ASL / English
Bilingual interventions would be presented. A video of MLS Deaf client will be shown.
Presenter will also discuss his research findings and recommendations. Activities working with a
MLS Deaf client would be provided (upon approval from Deaf clients). Strategies working with
a CDI would be discussed.
Target Audience: Advanced interpreter students to current interpreters.
CEUs: 0.25 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have intensive knowledge of this topic prior to
attending the seminar.
Educational Objectives
1. Identify a Deaf client with MLS / Semi-lingual skills.
2. Identify several interpretation and ASL / English Bilingual strategies to communicate with a
MLS / semi lingual Deaf client.
3. Identify interpretation strategies used to work with a CDI.
Increasing Visualization: Using film theory to enhance constructed action and constructed
dialogue in ASL
This workshop will employ Hollywood hits to make connections with a linguistic analysis of
ASL depictive verbs (classifiers), body shifting and use of perspective in ASL. We will discuss
how the use of classifiers, 3D space, surrogates, and facial expressions tell stories in ASL with
film-like techniques such as close up shots, panning shots, and zooms. This course will then use
spatial mapping and visualization to tie all of the features together. Participants will be able to
test their use of both visual language in engaging, hands-on activities and discuss how deeper
understanding of visual language rules can be applied to ASL storytelling or English to ASL
interpreting.
Target Audience: Signer
CEUs: 0.3 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have little to no knowledge of this topic prior to
attending the seminar.
Educational Objectives
1. Participants will complete a pre-assessment of their knowledge of cinematography and ASL
depictive verbs.
2. Open with discuss about basics of storytelling:
Will have group discuss, write list for two questions
a.) What are the characteristics of a good story?
b.) What are the skills of telling stories?
3. Simple survey of film theory- Define and show examples of cinematography techniques.
4. Overview of ASL depictive verbs/classifiers. Brief look at linguistic analysis techniques.
5. Activity and discussion
- Participants will draw parallels between the two visual languages.
- Participants will demonstrate understanding of visual language concepts through 2-3
hands on activities that will utilize the concepts discussed.
-Participants will discuss how deeper understanding of visual language rules can be
applied to ASL storytelling or English to ASL interpreting.
Preparing for the NIC Performance Test
This workshop will provide both lecture and hands on practice to prepare candidates for the RIDNAD NIC performance test. This workshop will go over the format of the test as outlined in the
RID NIC Handbook. The ten tasks that the RID-NAD NIC test examines will be discussed.
Participants will then go through hands on practice of a mock NIC test. Participants will follow
the breakdown of exam activity and the activity times so that they can get a feel for how long
each segment of the test will last. Both the ethical and interpreting portions will be practiced.
After the hands on portion is complete, a group discussion of the mock exam will take place
along with question and answer time.
Target Audience: Seniors in ITPs or graduates of an ITP
CEUs: 0.3 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have intensive knowledge of this topic prior to
attending the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. Understand the tasks they will be rated on during the RID-NAD NIC test
2. Formulate responses to the ethical questions on the RID-NAD NIC test
3. Become familiar with the process of the RID-NAD NIC test as evident through the mock NIC
test provided
Ethics for Interpreters
This 3 hour workshop examines the theoretical foundation from which decisions are made, how
those foundations are shaped by a variety of cultural influences. Ethical premises are discussed
as well as tenets of professionalism and how those broad concepts relate to interpreting.
Through lecture and hands-on, goal oriented activities we will examine theories of morality and
influences on morality that come from background, culture and ethnicity. Ethical premises will
be discussed along with the tenets of professionalism and how those broad concepts relate to
interpreting. Critical thinking models will be introduced to the participants to utilize during selfanalysis exercises. Participants will learn to differentiate between morality and ethics and apply
the theoretical knowledge to interpreting specific situations.
Target Audience: General Audience
CEUs : 0.3 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1) Identify influences on ethics that come from background, culture and ethnicity.
2) Differentiate between morality and ethics
3) Apply the theoretical knowledge to specific interpreting situations utilizing a critical thinking
modesl.
Interpreting Music in ASL
Target Audience: ASL students, interpreters seeking to be more expressive and idiomatic
in there signing/interpreting of songs.
CEUs: 0.3 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. Demonstrate various techniques used in glossing and interpreting songs.
2. Demonstrate the incorporation of classifiers, mouthing morphemes, acting, gestures, and
visual vernacular into songs.
3. Present song components as a team project to demonstrate several key processes involved in
the skill.
Interpreting Tool: ASL Classifier Signs
Do you feel that you are stuck by just signing for every word? Do you desire to be able to use a
visual layout by using classifier sign to express spatial relations of objects? You will learn and
use the tools, which may help you to understand the concept of eight different categories of
classifiers. They are designated handshapes to represent nouns and verbs. The purpose is to
provide additional information about them, which are location, kind of action, size, shape and
manner.
Target Audience: Interpreters and students
CEUs: 0.2 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have intensive knowledge of this topic prior to
attending the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1) List and define eight categories of classifier.
2) Explain what eight categories are and demonstrate how participants can use.
3) Participants will have the activity, which include practicing one sentence for each category in
ASL
The Ergonomics of Signing, and Other Tips to Prevent Overuse Syndrome
This workshop will present current research into the science of Ergonomics, and Overuse
Syndrome (a.k.a. Repetitive Motion Injury) with first-hand experience and tips for how to
prevent injury to one’s hands, shoulders, back, etc. The presenter will model signer-cises and
other exercises for the participants to practice.
Target Audience: those engaged in activities which cause pain in, or want to prevent injuries to,
their arms, hands, shoulders, back, neck, etc., specifically for sign language interpreters or
signers.
Content Knowledge: Participants should have little to no knowledge of this topic prior to
attending the seminar.
CEUs: 0.2 PS
Educational Objectives:
1. Define Ergonomics.
2. Define Overuse Syndrome and give 3 examples.
3. List and explain 3 ergonomic changes made to producing signs or ways in which interpreters
can improve movement to decrease injury.
4. Develop skills to prevent or minimize damaging one’s body when interpreting.
ASL Role Shifting
Target Audience: Interpreting students; ASL students (focus will be on role shifting in the
English-ASL translation process.
CEUs: 0.2 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. Distinguish between narrator and characters
2. Identify narrator and character(s) using indexing, body shifts, eye gaze, facial expression and
other non-manual behaviors
3. Relay characters’ affect
4. Accurately and consistently use space with characters
PA Interpreter Laws: What you should know
With sign language interpreter students graduating from colleges and universities, it is critical for
the interpreters to understand what Act 57 is and how to register with the Office for the Deaf and
Hard of Hearing. This presentation will summarize Act 57 and how ODHH can assist the
interpreters through the process of being state-registered in Pennsylvania. ODHH will speak
about other resources that could assist you to such as the resource directory and the library
collection at Hiram G. Andrews Center.
Target Audience: Sign Language interpreters, Interpreting students, ASL users, etc.
CEUs: 0.1 PS
Content Knowledge: Participants should have some knowledge of this topic prior to attending
the seminar.
Educational Objectives:
1. Briefly state what Act 57 is and how to properly follow procedure to become state-registered.
Also define the other PA Interpreter laws in effect.
2. Understand what ODHH is and how they can assist interpreters.
3. List several vital resources that can assist you to enhance your abilities as an interpreter after
you graduate.

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