Landlord Presentation - Michigan`s Campaign to End Homelessness

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First found Jul 4, 2016

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Landlord Presentation
(insert date of presentation)
1
Introductions
• Name, company/organization, supportive
housing experience
• Parking lot for items that require follow-up
• Technical assistance sessions available
2
Campaign to End Homelessness in
Michigan
• Michigan began the Campaign in 2006
• Every square inch of Michigan is covered
by a ten-year plan to end homelessness
• There is an over-arching statewide plan
• Michigan Departments of Human
Services, Community Health, Corrections,
Education and MSHDA all collaborate
regularly to end homelessness
3
Campaign to End Homelessness in
Michigan
• A partnership between state agencies,
nonprofit organizations, funders, local
elected officials, business, landlords, and
philanthropy to work together to end
homelessness in Michigan within the next
10 years.
4
The State of Homelessness in Michigan
2009 Annual Summary
100,001
Homeless in Michigan
5
Campaign to End Homelessness in
Michigan
• The Campaign To End Homelessness
web site –
www.thecampaigntoendhomeless.com
• Divided the state into 8 Regions
• Homeless Management Information
System (HMIS)
6
Campaign to End Homelessness in
Michigan
• Used HOME and state money to fund
Tenant Based Rental Assistance –
providing over 2,200 units to serve:
-Chronically Homeless
-Homeless Youth/Aging of Foster Care
-Family Homelessness
-Survivors of Domestic Violence
7
Campaign to End Homelessness in
Michigan
• Target HUD Project Based Vouchers to
supportive housing developments
• Tax Credit Qualified Allocation Plan –
requires construction of units for the
homeless.
• Supportive Housing (covered in more
detail in later slides)
8
MSHDA – Programs
• SSI/SSDI Outreach Access &
Recovery (SOAR) - SOAR Across
Michigan – assists with SSI
• Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)
• Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing (HPRP)
9
Homeless Assistance Recovery
Program
• Prioritizes MSHDA’s Housing Choice
Vouchers (HUD Section 8) for the
homeless
• Currently 7,300+ vouchers utilized by
previously homeless clients
• Vouchers become available through
attrition
• Clients work with a lead agency and their
local service provider
10
What is Supportive Housing?
A cost-effective combination of
permanent, affordable housing with
services that helps people live more
stable, productive lives.
11
Features of
Permanent Supportive Housing
• Permanent Rental Housing
– Each resident holds lease on his/her own unit
– Resident can stay as long as he/she pays rent and
complies with terms of lease (no arbitrary or artificial
time limits imposed)
• Affordable
– Tenants usually pay no more than 30% of income
for rent
12
Features of
Permanent Supportive Housing
• Flexible Services
– Participation in a “program” is not a condition of
residency
– Services are designed project by project for the target
population and the housing setting
– Services are flexible and responsive to individual
needs
• Collaborative Property Management
– Tenants, property managers and service providers
jointly resolve issues in order to foster tenant stability
• Cost Effective
– Costs no more, and often much less, than the cost of
homelessness or institutional care and produces better
13
outcomes
Who is Supportive Housing for?
Single adults, families and unaccompanied youth who have
often experienced:
– Long-term poverty coupled with persistent health
problems, including mental illness, substance abuse,
HIV/AIDS
– Histories of trauma, abuse and violence
– Repeated engagements with institutional settings
and crisis care services
– Long histories of homelessness
14
Who is Supportive Housing For?
People who:
• BUT FOR HOUSING cannot access and make effective
use of treatment and supportive services in the
community;
and
• BUT FOR SUPPORTIVE SERVICES cannot access and
maintain stable housing in the community.
15
What is the “Support” in Supportive
Housing?
• A flexible array of voluntary services that
may include:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Health and mental health services
Alcohol and substance use services
Independent living skills
Money management / representative payee
Vocational counseling and job placement
Child care
Community-building activities
Budgeting and financial management training
16
Formalizing Supportive Housing Partnerships
• Landlords must develop partnership with local
supportive service provider
• Local service provider must:
– Be able to refer eligible individuals/families based on
targeted populations
– Closely work with property manager
– Provide supportive services to tenants to maintain
housing
• Sponsor/Owner, Property Management Company,
and Local Service Provider must jointly complete a
Memorandum of Understanding.
17
Roles and Responsibilities
Owner
Property
Management
Supportive
Services
18
Roles and Responsibilities
Complex Partnerships
• Owner
 Private owner protects bottom line
 Nonprofit owner has “double bottom line”
 Property Manager
 “Bad Cop”
 Not the same as other affordable housing
 Needs a good working with relationship with Service
Provider
 Service Provider
 “Good Cop”
 Needs a good working relationship with Property
Manager
19
Benefits of Supportive Housing
Partnerships
• Individuals and Families who would benefit from SH are
already renters
• SH gives landlords more tools to resolve tenant problems and
avoid lease violations
• SH Partnerships enable landlords to serve a broader
population than they otherwise might
• SH increases tenant stability – reducing turnover
• Less turnover means less vacancy loss, and fewer repairs
• Collaborative problem solving means less property
management staff time in the long run
• Participation in community plan to end homelessness can
form partnerships in new areas
20
Local Supportive Housing
Opportunities
• MSHDA Housing Locator:www.MichiganHousingLocator.com
– Let others know you’re available
• Alphabet Soup of Rental Assistance Programs
– TBRA, HARP, HPRP, SHP, S + C, etc.
– Someone else will find an available program and keep track of the rules
• Contact the Lead Agency
– Your one-stop source for tenants and assistance
21
How to Get Started
• Contact the Lead Agency
• Develop and Sign an MOU
• Inspect and Qualify Your Apartment
• Sign Lease With Tenant
• Sign Agreement with Rental Assistance Program
22
The Problem Solving Process
• Contact the Lead Agency or Tenant’s Service Provider
• Work Out An Acceptable Agreement to Avoid or Resolve a
Lease Violation
• Access Additional Community Resources
– Lead Agency
– Other service providers
– IST
23
Community Comments
• Questions?
• Comments?
• Need a Technical Assistance Session?
24

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